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National news outlets are covering the frontline efforts of Tulanians to combat COVID-19 with research, innovation and a commitment to community. Scroll down to read more.

October 2020

Herd Immunity? Or ‘Mass Murder’?
New York Times

John M. Barry is a professor at the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine and the author of “The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History.”
 
Louisiana’s struggle against Covid-19
The Ecologist

The hazardous levels of air pollution found in the area may be partially to blame for its high concentration of Covid-19 deaths, which are among the highest in the nation, a recent study from the Tulane Environmental Law Clinic suggests.

Is COVID being spread through the workplace?
Radio.com

Thomas LaVeist, Dean of Tulane University talked about the matter: “To maintain safety for every worker, we need to think about stairwells, elevators, lunchrooms, and every place where a person might be,” LaVeist states.

Why the coronavirus is killing more men than women
Washington Post

“If you look at the data across the world, there are as many men as women that are infected. It’s just the severity of disease that is stronger in most populations in men,” Franck Mauvais-Jarvis, a Tulane University physician who studies gender differences in such diseases as diabetes.

Pandemic forcing exodus of women from workforce
CommonWealth Magazine

One study by Tulane University researchers found that two years after the hurricane, women’s participation in the workforce was down 6.6 percent, compared to 3.8 percent for men.

Home Remedies Not to Try for COVID-19
US News & World Report

A few small studies on viruses other than the coronavirus purport that doing saline nose rinses decreases the amount of measureable virus, says Dr. Joseph Bocchini Jr., director of Willis-Knighton Children's Health Services in Shreveport, Louisiana, and a member of the pediatric faculty at Tulane University in New Orleans.

Does the federal health information privacy law protect President Trump?
Salon

"There's a pretty strong tradition of these things being obscured," said John Barry, an adjunct faculty member at the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine.
 
Racism turned their neighborhood into 'Cancer Alley.’ Now they’re dying from COVID-19.
USA Today

"These are communities that for decades have been breathing air that harms their lungs. And it's pretty clear that people who have damaged lungs are more susceptible to COVID-19." - Kimberly Terrell, researcher at the Tulane Environmental Law Clinic

Does the Federal Health Information Privacy Law Protect President Trump?
Physician's Weekly

“There’s a pretty strong tradition of these things being obscured,” said John Barry, an adjunct faculty member at the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine.

The coronavirus is airborne -- what that means for you
CNET

Tulane University, for instance, reported that COVID-19 can remain in the air for up to 16 hours.

The Job Season Without In-Person Interviews
Chronicle of Higher Education

Brian T. Edwards is dean of the School of Liberal Arts at Tulane University, where he is also a professor of English.

‘Completely Inadequate’: Epidemiologists Question Abrupt End To WH Contact Tracing
Talking Points Memo

Susan Hassig, an epidemiologist at Tulane University, described the process to TPM as “completely inadequate.”

History tells us what a virus can do to a president
Washington Post

John M. Barry is the author of The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History and is a professor at the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine.
 
Rise in coronavirus hospitalizations threatens ICU bed capacity in hot-spot states
Washington Examiner

"When you start seeing rises, you need to respond quickly," said Susan Hassig, an epidemiology professor at Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine.
 
Of presidents and health, history replete with secrecy, lies
AP News

“The Wilson administration, for a very different reason, completely downplayed the pandemic,” said John Barry, an adjunct professor in public health at Tulane University whose book “The Great Influenza” chronicles the 1918-19 pandemic that sickened Wilson and killed 675,000 Americans.

Here’s Why It’s Unlikely That Trump Infected Biden
Talking Points Memo

Dr. Susan Hassig, an epidemiologist at Tulane University, also classified the risk to Biden from the debate as “very low.”

Trump experiencing mild Covid symptoms: Why the first week matters
NBC News

Dr. Josh Denson, a pulmonary medicine and critical care physician at the Tulane Medical Center in New Orleans, said it's rare for a person to become very sick within the first few days of infection.
 
What Happens If COVID-19 Diagnosis Means Trump Can’t Discharge the Duties of the Presidency
Law and Crime

After the news broke, attorney, Tulane Law professor and impeachment expert Ross Garber noted that the Presidential Succession Act means Pelosi is third in line. However, he also said “that may not be constitutional.”

Coronavirus caused spike in Google search for this symptom
Fox News

“Our analyses from shortly after the pandemic declaration are the tip of the iceberg,” said lead study author Michael Hoerger, an assistant professor of psychology in the Tulane School of Science and Engineering, in a statement.

Ask the College Guy: Should you include the pandemic in your college essay?
Concord Monitor

Jeff Schiffman, Director of Admission at Tulane University writes in his blog, “if you are going to use this section, it’s important to remind yourself that, quite literally, every single senior on planet earth has been impacted by COVID in some way.

September 2020

Black Health Matters: Wealth Is Health
Healthline

In the case of COVID-19, new research from Tulane University shows that BMI is a risk factor in Black patients when it comes to admission to intensive care units (ICUs).

Forbes’ Guide To College Admissions During The Pandemic
Forbes

Tulane, for example, tracks students’ visits to its online tours. This year, for the first time, Tulane applicants can interview remotely.

Use of 'China virus' led to spike in anti-Asian bias: study
The Hill

The study, from professors at the Universities of California — Berkeley and San Francisco — as well as the Tulane School of Medicine, found that years of incidents of violence and bias against Asian Americans trending downward was reversed earlier this year after top U.S. officials used the term to describe the COVID-19 outbreak.
 
The Surprising Symptom Everyone's Googling in the Pandemic, Study Says
Best Life

To understand the changes in mental health in the U.S. during this time, researchers from Tulane University, Loyola University New Orleans, and Central Michigan University used Google search trends to get a snapshot of how things have changed in the 40 days following the World Health Organization's pandemic declaration on March 11, 2020.

Anxiety symptoms increased during the pandemic, Google Trends show
Medical News Today

As Dr. Michael Hoerger, Assistant Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry at Tulane University Cancer Center, New Orleans, and his co-authors note: “Although by no means a ‘window into the soul,’ people’s search terms reflect relatively uncensored desires for information and thus lack many of the biases of traditional self-report surveys.”

Google searches related to anxiety, panic attacks spike during pandemic
The Hill

The study from researchers at Tulane University, Loyola University New Orleans and Central Michigan University found a spike in Google search trends related to anxiety and techniques used to manage its symptoms, such as yoga.

Google shows huge panic attack rise during COVID-19
World Economic Forum

Instead, the data may provide insight into what might be a foreboding of a much larger problem, says Michael Hoerger, an assistant professor of psychology in the Tulane University School of Science and Engineering, and coauthor of the study in the journal Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy.

Doomscrolling Isn't Helping Our Well Being Warn Experts
Forbes

"During the pandemic, many people are interacting with the world in 'real time' less often," said Dr. Catherine McKinley, associate professor in the School of Social Work at Tulane University.
 
Loneliness and Six Components of Well-Being and Self-Care
Psychology Today

Tonya Cross Hansel: Loneliness is the feeling one gets when they lack social connection. Most often this occurs due to a limited number of people to connect with; however, this can also be due to the quality of connections and a general sense of not belonging.
 
Shut Out of Schools Due to Pandemic, Many Education Researchers Say Their Work Is ‘In Shambles’
The 74 Million

Ongoing long-term studies “are now kind of in shambles,” said Douglas Harris, director of the National Center for Research on Education Access and Choice at Tulane University.

Epidemiologists uncertain whether long-feared autumn second wave of COVID-19 will materialize
Washington Examiner

"I suspect travel will increase for Thanksgiving," said Susan Hassig, an epidemiology professor at Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine.

People Struggling With Addiction Are Turning To Telehealth During The Pandemic — For Better And For Worse
In The Know

As Dr. Patrick Bordnick, dean of the Tulane University School of Social Work, notes, many people lack access to reliable WiFi or a working cell phone or laptop, rendering them unable to attend Zoom meetings or FaceTime their therapists.
 
‘Disastrous’: Why It’s So Damaging For Trump Admin To Doctor The CDC’s COVID Reports
Talking Points Memo

Dr. Susan Hassig, an epidemiologist at Tulane University, described the CDC reports to TPM as “accumulating information from all over the country, and collecting and answering questions that might not be answerable at the local level.”
 
Experts Say Trump Downplaying Risks Of The Coronavirus Was Not Justified
NPR

JOHN BARRY: Winston Churchill is famous for his "Blood, Sweat And Tears" (ph) speech, and that is a classic of what leadership is.

A shortage of test monkeys slows down coronavirus vaccine research
New York Daily News

“Their immune systems and immune responses are very similar to what you see in humans, and they can give you a very good idea of safety and efficacy in vaccines,” Jay Rappaport, director and chief academic officer of Tulane’s National Primate Research Center, told USA Today.
 
Should I Feel Guilty for Wanting to Travel Right Now?
Conde Nast Traveler

“[Travel] is not a question of safe, but a question of your own individual risk tolerance,” says [Susan] Hassig. “Nothing is perfectly safe. That's just a given.”
 
Wearing a Mask May Reduce How Sick You Get from COVID-19
Healthline

According to Robert F. Garry, Jr., PhD, professor of microbiology and immunology, at Tulane University School of Medicine, a mask provides a physical barrier to catch those droplets.

America is facing a monkey shortage as demand skyrockets for COVID-19 research, experts say
USA Today

“There is a shortage,” said Dr. Skip Bohm, associate director and chief veterinary medical officer of the Tulane National Primate Research Center.

Why COVID-19 Is More Deadly in People With Obesity—Even If They're Young
Pulitzer Center

A recent study from Tulane University of 287 hospitalized COVID-19 patients found that metabolic syndrome itself substantially increased the risks of ICU admission, ventilation, and death.

Metabolic Syndrome Linked to Worse Outcomes in COVID-19
Endocrinology Advisor

John Xie, M.D., from the Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans, and colleagues collected data from 287 patients (85.4 percent non-Hispanic Black) with COVID-19 hospitalized at two hospitals from March 30 to April 5, 2020.
 
Creative school plans could counter inequities exposed by COVID-19
Science News

“There were gaps before. Now they’re wider,” says education economist Douglas Harris of Tulane University in New Orleans.
 
Why COVID-19 is more deadly in people with obesity—even if they're young
Science Magazine

A recent study from Tulane University of 287 hospitalized COVID-19 patients found that metabolic syndrome itself substantially increased the risks of ICU admission, ventilation, and death.

Risk ranking of everyday activities for COVID-19, according to an infectious-disease expert
Business Insider

Dr. Susan Hassig, an epidemiologist at Tulane University, shares how to think about managing the risk of everyday activities

BMI identified as independent risk factor for COVID-19 ICU admission for African Americans
Healio

“The COVID-19 epidemic in the United States tracks along well-documented and historical health disparities, with early data suggesting disproportionate morbidity and mortality within the African American community,” Christine M. Bojanowski, MD, assistant professor and co-director of the adult cystic fibrosis program at Tulane University School of Medicine, and colleagues wrote.

Obesity boosts risks in COVID-19 from diagnosis to death
MD Edge

Pulmonologist Joshua L. Denson, MD, MS, of Tulane University, New Orleans, praised the review in an interview, but noted that some of the included studies have wide confidence intervals.

August 2020

America Is Running Low on a Crucial Resource for COVID-19 Vaccines
The Atlantic

For example, monkey and human immune systems are so similar that vaccine studies can use the same tests to measure antibodies in both. “Literally the same test,” says Skip Bohm, the associate director of the Tulane National Primate Research Center.
 
Cluster of high BP, diabetes and obesity linked to 4-fold greater mortality risk from Covid-19
Physician's Weekly

The findings suggest that metabolic syndrome is a “composite predictor of Covid-19 lethal outcome,” wrote researcher Joshua Denson, MD, of Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, and colleagues.
 
Metabolic Syndrome Linked to Worse Outcomes in COVID-19
Renal and Urology News

John Xie, MD, from the Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans, and colleagues collected data from 287 patients (85.4% non-Hispanic Black) with COVID-19 hospitalized at 2 hospitals from March 30 to April 5, 2020.

The 'nightmare' winter: What happens when Covid-19 and flu strike together?
Advisory Board

On one hand, Thomas LaVeist, dean of the school of public health and tropical medicine at Tulane University, said measures put in place to "help reduce the spread of [the coronavirus] are the same measures that would help reduce the spread of influenza."

Metabolic Syndrome Linked to Worse Outcomes in COVID-19
Drugs.com

John Xie, M.D., from the Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans, and colleagues collected data from 287 patients (85.4 percent non-Hispanic Black) with COVID-19 hospitalized at two hospitals from March 30 to April 5, 2020. The authors sought to examine the association of hypertension, obesity, and diabetes, individually and clustered as MetS, with COVID-19 outcomes.

Colleges Prepare to Weather Hurricanes and Fires
Inside Higher Ed

Michael Fitts, president of Tulane, said that disaster readiness and COVID-19 precautions go hand in hand. “Everything we do on campus has to take into account COVID-19,” he said. “For example, we built 13 new classrooms where students can be socially distanced and distanced from faculty, and all those classrooms are capable of withstanding a Category 3 hurricane.”
 
Telehealth etiquette advice for physicians
Medical Economics

Dr. Baum is Professor of Clinical Urology at Tulane Medical School in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Hospitalized coronavirus patients who are obese, have diabetes and high blood pressure are THREE TIMES more likely to die, study finds
Daily Mail

'Together, obesity, diabetes and pre-diabetes, high blood pressure and abnormal cholesterol levels are all predictive of higher incidents of death in these patients,' said lead author Dr Joshua Denson, assistant professor of medicine and pulmonary and critical care medicine physician at Tulane University School of Medicine.

U.S. Coronavirus Cases Declining in Part Due to Mask Mandates and Bar Closures, Experts Say
People

Susan Hassig, an epidemiologist at Tulane University, has also pointed towards the July 13 closure of bars and restaurants as a turning point for Louisiana. “That’s when we started seeing cases plateau,” Hassig said.

4 Ways to Enhance Human Interaction in Socially-Distanced Learning
Ed Surge

A recent study by researchers at Tulane University found that it took two school years for returning students to recover the learning lost to Hurricane Katrina.

COVID-19: There Is Only One Priority
Forbes

An excellent article in The New York Times, “A Warning for the United States From the Author of ‘The Great Influenza’” by John M. Barry, professor of public health at Tulane University and author of several books on historic pandemics, sets out the priorities for the future, and above all highlights the false dichotomy between bringing the pandemic under control and protecting the economy.

Study to explore risks and benefits of breastfeeding during COVID-19
News-Medical

Supported by a $200,000 collaborative grant awarded through the National Science Foundation Rapid Response Research funding mechanism, Meehan's research team at WSU and researchers at the University of Idaho, University of Washington, and Tulane University are working together on their new nationwide study on COVID-19 and infant feeding.

It’s Simple. Contain the Virus. The Economy Will Come Back.
New York Times

Mr. [John M.] Barry is the author of “The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History.”

NYC COVID-19 Deaths During Peak Rivaled 1918 Flu Fatalities
Healthline

And it should be noted that New York City had a relatively benign experience during the 1918 pandemic, added John Barry, MPH, an author, historian, and professor at Tulane University in New Orleans.

What Should We Still Be Cleaning And Disinfecting To Prevent COVID-19?
Huff Post

While other precautions are more crucial to preventing COVID-19, David Mushatt, chief of adult infectious diseases at the Tulane School of Medicine, encouraged the public to continue disinfecting high-touch surfaces in addition to following all the other CDC guidelines.

After the Pandemic, Medical Schools Will Never Be the Same. That Could Be a Good Thing.
Mother Jones

“At the end of the day,” says Dr. Kevin Krane, vice dean for academic affairs at Tulane University School of Medicine, “the MD is not an online degree.”

Louisiana may have passed the worst of its second COVID-19 surge
Washington Examiner

"I would like to hope that Louisiana [is past the peak], but I don’t feel completely comfortable saying that," said Susan Hassig, an epidemiology professor at Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine.
 
The Contact Tracers Caring for America, Even if the Country Doesn't Care
Inverse

Charles Figley, the founder of Tulane University’s Traumatology Institute, likens compassion fatigue to the constant prodding of a recently healed wound.

Canceling college football is coming down to dollars and sense
NBC News

Gabe Feldman, the director of Tulane University’s sports law program, said that "liability is a concern for any entity that is opening its doors for whatever business they’re conducting right now.”

How The Coronavirus Has Upended College Admissions
NPR

"I don't even know where to begin," Jeff Schiffman, director of undergraduate admissions at Tulane University, said with a sigh. "We're going to have to hit the reset button hard on this one. It's going to take a compete retraining of how we review applications and what we're looking for. We're kind of figuring it out as we go."

11 Supposedly Fun Things We’ll Never Do the Same Way Again
New York Times

The tradition of singing around a birthday cake and blowing out the candles could fade. “Spit all over the cake has always been disgusting to me,” said Susan Hassig, an associate professor of epidemiology at Tulane University in New Orleans.
 
How racism undermines the COVID-19 response and recovery
Center for Health Journalism

Widespread disinformation on flyers targeting African Americans in New Orleans encouraged people not to get tested, according to Dr. Tom LaVeist, dean of the School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine at Tulane University.
 
Seven Ways the Pandemic Is Affecting Our Mental Health
Greater Good Magazine

“In an ironic twist, many of the strategies that are critical to ensuring our collective public health during this pandemic may put people at greater risk for . . . mental health issues,” write Frederick Buttell and Regardt J. Ferreira at Tulane University in a recent, special issue of the journal Psychological Trauma.

Demand for tutors skyrockets as pandemic lays bare inequalities in education
Los Angeles Daily News

When New Orleans schools shuttered in August 2005 and didn’t reopen until the following school year, students took two years to make up the learning they’d lost, according to research by Tulane’s Doug Harris.

Obesity, race play roles in severe COVID-19 illness among kids
NBC News

"There's something about obesity that causes an underlying inflammatory state that we don't understand that much about," said Dr. Josh Denson, a pulmonary medicine and critical care physician at the Tulane Medical Center in New Orleans.
 
High BMI linked to COVID-19 severity in African Americans
Medical News Today

Dr. Christine Bojanowski, an assistant professor at Tulane University’s School of Medicine, in New Orleans, LA, and the corresponding author of the present study, notes, “It is of tremendous importance that we identify risk factors and those individuals who may be at increased risk for severe COVID-19 infection, so that we are able [to] dedicate efforts toward supporting those most affected and in need.”

There’s More Evidence That Black Americans Face High Risks from COVID-19
Healthline

“It is of tremendous importance that we identify risk factors and those individuals who may be at increased risk for severe COVID-19 infection, so that we are able [to] dedicate efforts towards supporting those most affected and in need,” Dr. Christine Bojanowski, corresponding author of the study and an assistant professor in the department of medicine at Tulane University, said in a press release.

Experts Fear Trump Admin Will Rush To Promote Vaccine That’s Not Yet Ready
Talking Points Memo

“The individuals that receive the vaccine have to be exposed naturally to it,” Dr. Susan Hassig, an epidemiologist at Tulane University, told TPM.   
 
African American BMi associated with severe COVID-19 and ICU admission
Medical Xpress

"It is of tremendous importance that we identify risk factors and those individuals who may be at increased risk for severe COVID-19 infection, so that we are able dedicate efforts towards supporting those most affected and in need," said Christine Bojanowski, MD, assistant professor in the Department of Medicine, Section of Pulmonary Diseases, Critical Care and Environmental Medicine at Tulane University Health Science Center in New Orleans, La. Bojanowski is the corresponding author of the study.   
 
Obesity puts older African-Americans at higher risk for severe COVID-19
UPI

"This study is of particular interest in response to emerging reports revealing the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on the African American community in our country," said Bojanowski, assistant professor of medicine at Tulane.

Non-COVID-19 health care visits declined dramatically as pandemic hit
Mirage News

The study’s other authors are Engy Ziedan, an assistant professor of economics at Tulane University, and Coady Wing, an associate professor in the O’Neill School.

Covid Tests and Quarantines: Colleges Brace for an Uncertain Fall
New York Times

Temporary classrooms on Tulane University's campus in New Orleans are meant to encourage social distancing.

View In the News: February - July 2020