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National news outlets are covering the frontline efforts of Tulanians to combat COVID-19 with research, innovation and a commitment to community. Scroll down to read more.

June 2020

How to prepare for hurricane season in the COVID-19 pandemic: What's changed
The Tennessean

“It is a difficult situation trying to simultaneously communicate protective courses of action to two very distinct threats with very different messages,” said Tulane University assistant professor Stephen Murphy, whose research focuses on effective disaster resilience strategies.

May 2020

ICE keeps transferring detainees around the country, leading to COVID-19 outbreaks
NBC News

If half of detainees tested come back positive, ICE isn't testing enough, said Dr. Anjali Niyogi, associate professor at Tulane School of Medicine, a public health expert who has been treating coronavirus cases in New Orleans.
 
What Do Coronavirus Racial Disparities Look Like State By State?
NPR

In response, officials have changed their strategy, sending mobile testing vans to some of those areas, says Thomas LaVeist, dean of Tulane University's School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine and co-chair of Louisiana's COVID-19 Health Equity Task Force.

How long can Americans live in a state of emergency?
Christian Science Monitor

Yet when it comes to civil liberties and the 1918 flu, even that comparison isn’t fully on point, according to John M. Barry, a historian at Tulane University and author of “The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History.”
 
What happens if a hurricane hits Texas in the middle of a pandemic?
Dallas Morning News

A worst-case scenario would be a major hurricane hitting the coast in late October as cold and flu season begins and as cases of COVID-19 could see a second spike across the country, according to Dr. Thomas A. LaVeist, dean of Tulane University’s school of public health and tropical medicine.

How to camp during a historic pandemic
Mashable

"Any place people congregate is a place where the virus can spread rapidly," said Susan Hassig, an epidemiologist at Tulane University.

As restaurants reopen, here’s what you should know about air conditioning, air flow and the coronavirus
Washington Post

“That evidence is building right now,” says Chad Roy, director of infectious-disease aerobiology at the Tulane National Primate Research Center.

'We All Feel At Risk': 100,000 People Dead From COVID-19 In The U.S.
NPR

"I think anybody who understands anything about infectious disease recognizes that we were going to sooner or later face something like this," said John Barry, a professor at Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine and author of The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History, on NPR's Fresh Air earlier this month.

Covid-19 Flares Up in America's Polluted ‘Sacrifice Zones’
Wired

“Parishes with more pollution and higher percentages of African Americans have higher Covid-19 death rates,” says Kimberly Terrell, director of community outreach at the Tulane clinic. “And that is not explained by poverty, by unemployment, by diabetes, or by obesity.”

New normal for medicine emerges as hospitals return to elective surgeries, non-COVID work
ABC News

Dr. Brandon Mauldin, the Chief Medical Officers of the Tulane Health System in Louisiana, referred to this dilemma as a "balancing act."
 
Dr. Joshua Denson on possibility of second COVID-19 wave
Fox News

Tulane Medical Center expert, Dr. Joshua Denson joins Neil Cavuto to discuss the possibility of a second COVID-19 wave as crowds flock to beaches over the holiday weekend.

How to avoid a second wave of infections
Washington Post

John M. Barry is author of The Great Influenza: the story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History and a professor at the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine.

Anonymous African American donors step up to tackle food insecurity during COVID-19 pandemic
ABC News

Tulane professor Diego Rose would not be surprised if that number surges past 15% when new data comes in.

When eviction protections are lifted, how will people afford to pay accumulated rent?
San Francisco Chronicle

Sally Richardson, a professor at Tulane Law School, said balloon payments could devastate households nationwide.

Why some viruses die out in summer, but others thrive
Medium

“The million-dollar question is why they behave differently,” said David Mushatt, the infectious disease section chief at Tulane University School of Medicine.

Pandemic magnifies uncertainty amid NOAA's forecast for active hurricane season
S&P Global

Regarding service restoration, Tulane Energy Institute Associate Director Eric Smith said, "Even without hurricanes, utilities are already having difficulties with staffing up for long-scheduled nuclear refueling projects.
 
Tulane and LSU: Leaders committed to reopening education, research progress
The Advocate

Mike Fitts is the president of Tulane University. Tom Galligan is interim president of LSU.

White House Cases Show How Easily COVID-19 Can Invade a Workplace
Healthline

One of the key lessons the White House’s response can teach us is the limitations of testing as a way to control COVID-19 spread, according to Susan Hassig, DrPH, MPH, an epidemiologist and director of the master’s in public health program at the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine in Louisiana

The Latest: Pennsylvania working on sports virus guidelines
AP News

The American Athletic Conference is forming a COVID-19 medical advisory group that will be chaired by Tulane director of sports medicine Greg Stewart.
 
Why some viruses die out in summer, but others don't
Mashable

"The million-dollar question is why they behave differently," said David Mushatt, the infectious disease section chief at Tulane University School of Medicine.
 
Indiana Players Will Return to Completely Different Campus in a Few Weeks
Sports Illustrated

"I told people I thought shutting down everything was hard. This opening up is... 'Oh my God!'" says Greg Stewart, the longtime Tulane team physician who has recently been charged with leading the American Athletic Conference's reopening plan.
 
HISTORY CHECK: Did 1918 Spanish flu ‘decimate more than 300,000’ South Africans in just two years?
Africa Check

John Barry is professor at the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. In a recent interview, he pointed out that the Spanish flu had a shorter incubation period than Covid-19.

COVID-19's Turmoil Could Make Schools a Potent Election Issue
Education Week

If Washington’s education relief turns out to be relatively meager, “You can bet that Biden will point that out,” said Douglas N. Harris, professor and chair of economics at Tulane University.

COVID-19: “Communities of colour are at ground zero for this crisis”
Cardiovascular News

[Keith C] Ferdinand talks to Cardiovascular News about the potential reasons for this higher mortality rate and the general implications for healthcare inequalities seen among racial/ethnic minority groups.
 
The Struggles of Homeschooling in the World’s Tiniest Apartments
Bloomberg

“This is the biggest crisis schools have ever faced,” said Douglas Harris, an economics professor and director of the Education Research Alliance at Tulane University in New Orleans.
 
New Orleans' Lower Ninth Ward battling racial disparities brought on by coronavirus
Fox News

Thomas LaVeist, dean of Tulane University’s School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, said the accelerated spread in poorer black communities was alarming but not surprising.
 
Evidence suggests no COVID-19-related harm from RAAS antagonists
Healio

"Overall, they are quite consistent in failing to show a relationship between renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibitors and COVID-19 infection or severe/fatal complications,” Paul K. Whelton, MB, MD, MSc, Show Chwan Professor of Global Public Health, department of epidemiology, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine and Tulane University of Medicine, told Healio.

Will the Coronavirus Make Us Rethink Mass Incarceration?
New Yorker

This logic was pernicious; according to an open letter written by the dean of Tulane’s public-health school and other experts, the longer the parish delayed releases, the more genuine the threat of mass infection in the jail was—and thus the more likely it would be to spread to the public.
 
The risk levels of everyday activities like dining out, going to the gym, and getting a haircut, according to an infectious-disease expert
Business Insider

So we spoke with Dr. Susan Hassig, an associate professor of epidemiology at the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine in New Orleans, about the risks of going out to eat, gathering with friends, and opening mail.

'I'm Scared': Study Links Cancer Alley Air Pollution to Higher Death Rates From Covid-19
Gizmodo

“Air pollution is something we sort of think of as a slow killer, but covid-19 really illustrates that it can also be a fast killer,” lead author Kimberly Terrell, the director of community outreach at the Tulane Environmental Law Clinic, told Earther.

Why Are Women-Led Nations Doing Better With Covid-19?
New York Times

When Ruth Carlitz, a political scientist at Tulane University, analyzed governors’ track records in the United States, she found that women were not quicker to impose lockdowns to fight the coronavirus.
 
COVID-19 and scientific confusion — What we don't know and why we don't know it
CBC Radio

We want to make sure we do a complete job... That collective data has to be so strong.- Dr. Chad Roy

The Richest Neighborhoods Emptied Out Most as Coronavirus Hit New York City
New York Times

Fleeing a city during a time of crisis is an instinctive reaction for many of us, said Andy Horowitz, a professor at Tulane University who studies disasters and wrote a book about the impact of Hurricane Katrina.
 
White House Cases Show How Easily COVID-19 Can Invade a Workplace
Healthline

One of the key lessons the White House’s response can teach us is the limitations of testing as a way to control COVID-19 spread, according to Susan Hassig, DrPH, MPH, an epidemiologist and director of the master’s in public health program at the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine in Louisiana.

What coronavirus outbreaks have in common
Mashable

That's the reality, for perhaps a year or longer. Take it from experts who know pathogens best. "I wash my hands incessantly," said Thomas LaVeist, dean of the School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine at Tulane University.
 
Polar Explorers Talk About How to Keep Your Cool in Isolation
Vice

Brent Goehring, assistant professor, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Tulane University: My job is to go and collect geology samples, and quite often they're in remote locations like Antarctica.

Men Have More Severe Coronavirus Symptoms. What About Boys?
Fatherly

So far, the evidence doesn’t point to it, says Susan Hassig, an epidemiologist at Tulane University School of Public Health & Tropical Medicine. “Young boys don’t have a lot of risk,” she says.

Isaacson: It’s going to be a delicate balancing act for businesses
CNBC

Tulane University professor and advisory partner at Parella Weinberg Walter Isaacson and Ulta CEO Mary Dillon discuss the path forward for business post-pandemic.
 
African countries ease Covid-19 measures amid warnings of possible rebound
La Prensa Latina

“Without government palliative measures, many people would starve and a lot would rather die of Covid-19 than of hunger. So it is a dicey situation,” said [Adaora] Okoli, who works as a resident doctor at Tulane University in the United States.
 
Design Thinking Will Be Essential In A Post Coronavirus World, Says Trinidadian Educator
Jamaicans.com

Such is the opinion of Caribbean educator Dr. Lesley Ann Noel, Professor of Practice at The Taylor Center for Social Innovation and Design Thinking at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Vitamin D could play role in lessening risk if you get COVID-19
11 Alive

"That is what the study suggests, that having a higher vitamin D level may be protective," said Tulane Professor of Medicine Dr. Jay Kolls, an adult and pediatric pulmonologist who specializes in lung immunology research.

Coronavirus and Water Systems
Water Environment Federation

Lee Gary is an Adjunct Professor at Tulane University, an instructor with the Basic Academy at the FEMA/Emergency Management Institute (Emmitsburg, Md.) and the owner and CEO of Strategic Management Services (New Orleans). Samendra Sherchan is an Assistant Professor at the Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine (New Orleans, La.).

Librarian Volunteers Help WHO Make Sense of COVID Information
Library Journal

David Banush, dean of libraries at Tulane’s Howard-Tilton Memorial Library, believes the LRC will help universities understand the value of librarians beyond their traditional mandate.

The Search for a Covid-19 Research Animal Model
Wired

Without an animal model that closely replicates what goes on in humans, there’s potential for harm in a fast-moving pandemic response like the one mobilizing now, warns Jay Rappaport, the director of Tulane National Primate Research Center.
 
Covid-19 may last up to 2 years: US researchers
India Today

The four researchers who compared the trends from past pandemics are Dr Kristine A. Moore (CIDRAP's medical director), Dr Marc Lipsitch (director of the Center for Communicable Disease Dynamics, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health), John M. Barry (professor at Tulane University School of Public Health) and Michael T. Osterholm (director of CIDRAP).

Challenges abound for students forced to take classes remotely
CBS News

"It's hard to understate how big a deal it is," said Doug Harris, a professor at Tulane University in New Orleans, who is studying the impact of the coronavirus on schools.

Evidence mounts on the disproportionate effect of COVID-19 on ethnic minorities
The Lancet

“I do not think that the pattern we are seeing in COVID-19 deaths for African Americans is solely due to pre-existing health conditions”, says Thomas A LaVeist, Dean of the School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine at Tulane University, New Orleans, LA, USA.

How to communicate in a postmodern pandemic
Quartz

Mass graves and trains were needed to handle the dead at stricken army bases and small towns, chronicles John Barry, a historian at Tulane University and author of The Great Influenza.
 
How can the Caribbean prepare for a post-COVID-19 world?
Global Voices

Lesley-Ann Noel, associate director for design thinking for social impact and professor of practice at Tulane University, believes that design thinking is a great way for Caribbean nations to reengineer many aspects of life — and governance — after the pandemic.

‘We are living in a catastrophe’: Peru's jungle capital choking for breath as Covid-19 hits
The Guardian

The pandemic could not have arrived at a worse time, said Valerie Paz-Soldan, a Peruvian-American social scientist and director of Tulane Health Offices for Latin America.
 
Schools Try to Stem ‘Covid Slide’ Learning Loss
Wall Street Journal

It took students who were displaced by Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans two years to catch up to where they would have been had the disaster not happened, according to Doug Harris, an economics professor at Tulane University and founding director of the Educational Research Alliance, which has studied the effects of the New Orleans school system after the 2005 hurricane.

Neil H. Baum, MD, on Telemedicine in Oncology
Cancer Network

In an interview with CancerNetwork®, Neil H. Baum, MD, professor of clinical urology at Tulane Medical School, discussed the transition to telemedicine and how coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) may have changed the practice of medicine moving forward.

New Orleans Cancels Famed Jazz Funerals Due to COVID-19 Pandemic
Black Enterprise

“You can trace the impact of the health crisis in New Orleans by the silence of the city — no brass bands, no funerals, no church services happening,” said Tulane University ethnomusicologist Matt Sakakeeny. “Mourning is happening in the homes.”
 
We spoke to the mayor of Salt Lake City, an investment analyst, and infectious disease experts to learn about when and how the US will reopen
Business Insider

Restaurants would need to have tables spaced at least 6 feet apart from each other, and staff would still need to be screened and wear masks, said Dr. Susan Hassig, associate professor of epidemiology at the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine.

Profile of a killer: the complex biology powering the coronavirus pandemic
Nature

Robert Garry, a virologist at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana, estimates that it gives SARS-CoV-2 a 100–1,000 times greater chance than SARS-CoV of getting deep into the lungs.

Crisis and Adaptation for the Public Good
Stanford Social Innovation Review

Given the world-wide shock to our systems—including higher education—represented by COVID-19, Tulane’s example of a pivot, rather than a simple return to the pre-crisis status quo, presents a useful example for other institutions.

Will Coronavirus Be the Death or Salvation of Big Plastic?
Time

“It’s a sad scenario in West Texas,” Eric Smith, associate director of the Tulane Energy Institute, told industry news outlet 1020 Industry Report earlier this month. “This is perfectly good natural gas, but it’s being flared. The price is so low that there’s no incentive for them to do anything else.”
 
How Might the Change of Seasons Affect Covid-19?
Wired

For that project, Chad J. Roy, a microbiologist and director of the infectious disease aerobiology and biodefense research programs at Tulane University’s National Primate Center, oversaw work at two universities and two government labs in which the Covid-19 virus was aerosolized and spun in a high-velocity drum, what he describes as “a very stressful environment for pathogens.”d industry news outlet 1020 Industry Report earlier this month. “This is perfectly good natural gas, but it’s being flared. The price is so low that there’s no incentive for them to do anything else.”
 
Wake-Up Call
Grist

Kimberly Terrell, director of community outreach at the Tulane University Environmental Law Clinic, identified Louisiana’s PM 2.5 hotspots and looked at the COVID-19 outbreaks in those locations.

Trump administration terminates funding of coronavirus bat research in China
CBS News

Professor Robert Garry of the University of Tulane joins CBSN to talk funding cuts, conspiracy theories, and the importance of cataloging the hundreds of different coronaviruses found in Chinese bats.

Will warm weather slow coronavirus?
Gulf News

John M. Barry is the author of “The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History” and a professor at the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine.

The fractured generation takes shape
The Hill

Brian T. Edwards is the dean of the School of Liberal Arts at Tulane University. His most recent book is “After the American Century: The Ends of U.S. Culture in the Middle East.”

Coronavirus Pandemic Likely to Last Two Years, Report Says
Bloomberg

The report was written by CIDRAP director Michael Osterholm and medical director Kristen Moore, Tulane University public health historian John Barry, and Marc Lipsitch, an epidemiologist at the Harvard School of Public Health.
 
To study coronavirus in the air, all eyes on a Chinese restaurant
ABC News

“There is a growing body of evidence that people can be infected by airborne transmission,” Dr. Chad Roy, one of the authors of the study, told ABC News.
 
In the Deep South, COVID-19 reveals systemic issues hurting vulnerable black communities
Tennessean

“Clearly this is a very discriminatory disease,” said Thomas LaVeist, the dean of the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. “It discriminates among people with several forms of disadvantages: the poor, the immunocompromised, those who can’t work from home on Zoom.”

April 2020

Will Warm Weather Slow Coronavirus?
New York Times

By John M. Barry- Mr. Barry is the author of “The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History.”
 
After coronavirus, expect high school dropout wave. 9/11 was the trigger for my sisters.
USA Today

Doug Harris, a Tulane researcher who tracked students after Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans, predicts that “unfortunately, we’re going to see a spike in the high school dropout rate” and a decline in college enrollments.

Why The U.S. Government Stopped Funding A Research Project On Bats And Coronaviruses
NPR

To learn more about the cutoff of funds and the possible impact on coronavirus research, NPR interviewed the president of EcoHealth Alliance, Peter Daszak, as well as Robert Garry, a microbiologist at Tulane University who is playing a prominent role in COVID-19 research but who does not work with the nonprofit.
 
African Americans struggle with disproportionate COVID death toll
MSN

Dr. Keith Ferdinand, professor of medicine at Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans, said numerous variables are making African Americans more vulnerable to COVID-19.
 
Architecture Deans on How COVID-19 Will Impact Architecture Education
Archinect

"New delivery modes and technologies may help us to criticize the very own relation of master and pupil that we have kept nurturing over generations [...] and to suggest a more open and challenging relation."- Iñaki Alday, Dean & Koch Chair in Architecture, Tulane University School of Architecture
 
Clinical Wearable Biostrap Launches COVID-19 Study
San Antonio Express-News

“No other wearable I am aware of has the same level of informative detail enabling me to collect and dissect the clinical data than Biostrap,” says Dr. Nassir Marrouche, Professor of Medicine at Tulane University, noting that life during and after COVID-19 is going to be different than it was before; wearables and telemedicine are the inevitable reality of medicine.

Will Trump’s name on stimulus checks help win him votes in November?
Washington Post

Virginia Oliveros (@VirOliveros) is associate professor of political science at Tulane University and 2019-2020 visiting fellow at the Kellogg Institute at the University of Notre Dame.
 
The Anti-Mask League: lockdown protests draw parallels to 1918 pandemic
The Guardian

“Hassler and the mayor, whose wife was ill, called for remasking,” says historian John M Barry, a professor at Tulane University’s school of public health and the author of The Great Influenza.
 
Legal Jargon on Cruise Tickets May Foil Class-Action Suits
Bloomberg

“These claims are enormous – nothing the industry’s seen before with so many passengers fallen sick and bringing suit,” said Martin Davies, director of the Tulane Maritime Law Center at Tulane University Law School.
 
U.S. Concerned China Still Not Being Transparent About Lab Activities, Says Secretary Of State Pompeo
Newsweek

"Our analyses, and others too, point to an earlier origin than that. There were definitely cases there, but that wasn't the origin of the virus," Robert Garry, a professor at Tulane University School of Medicine, told ABC News.

School of Architecture Deans Detail COVID-19’s Impact on End of the Year Activities
Archinect

"Students will exhibit their work taking as much space as needed, probably in the digitally recreated spaces of our building. Now we have about 200 review rooms and main lobbies available!"- Iñaki Alday, Dean & Koch Chair in Architecture, Tulane University School of Architecture

What to Know About COVID-19 Testing Right Now
Healthline

“They often, but not always, correlate with immunity, as sometimes they work in concert with cellular immunity to provide immune protection,” said Dr. David Mushatt, an infectious disease specialist and section chief of infectious diseases at Tulane University.
 
COVID-19 'Therapy' Arrhythmic Risks Put Focus on 12-Lead ECG Alternatives
Medscape

Nassir F. Marrouche, MD, speaking with theheart.org | Medscape Cardiology, wondered "whether we are overdoing it" with calls to monitor the QTc for side effects of the off-label treatments.
 
Will COVID-19 Finally Trigger Action on Health Disparities?
Medscape

The question is, he asks, will the nation finally "think differently, and as has been done in response to other major diseases, declare that a civil society will no longer accept disproportionate suffering?" Keith C. Ferdinand, MD, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, doesn't think so.
 
School of Architecture Deans Voice Institutional Responses to the COVID-19 Crisis, Part I
Archinect

"Tulane University and the School of Architecture are probably in a special place in a circumstance like this one due to our preparation of hurricanes and climatic events." - Iñaki Alday, Dean & Koch Chair in Architecture, Tulane University School of Architecture

A Virginia preacher believed ‘God can heal anything.’ Then he caught coronavirus.
Washington Post

John Barry, a scholar of the 1918 influenza pandemic who teaches at the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, lives in New Orleans. He was closely tracking the spread of the virus and would become an active critic of the Trump administration’s response.
 
In the 'epicenter of the epicenter,' were early heart attacks a missed coronavirus warning?
ABC News

Dr. Siyab Panhwar, cardiology fellow at Tulane Medical Center, also warned that it was "very possible" that blood clotting triggered by the coronavirus could be to blame and "causing more cardiac arrests."

Why is coronavirus taking such a deadly toll on black Americans?
The Guardian

“If you look at the health conditions that we know dramatically increase the risk of death if you’re infected with Sars Covid-2, African Americans have much higher prevalence of every one of those conditions. Diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, you name it, African Americans have a higher prevalence,” explained Thomas LaVeist, dean and professor at Tulane’s school of public health and tropical medicine.
 
New Orleans artists struggle to survive as coronavirus causes tourism dip
Fox News

Peter Ricchiuti, a business professor at Tulane University, said the city was in a uniquely vulnerable predicament.
 
‘Quarantine fatigue’: Researchers find more Americans venturing out against coronavirus stay-at-home orders
Washington Post

“People can feel it’s coming, so they get more antsy,” said Susan Hassig, an associate professor of epidemiology at Tulane University. “It’s kind of like a kid before Christmas.”
 
Jazz funerals, normally a 'celebration of life,' are silenced: New Orleans grieves differently now
USA Today

“You can trace the impact of the health crisis in New Orleans by the silence of the city – no brass bands, no funerals, no church services happening,” said Tulane University ethnomusicologist Matt Sakakeeny. “Mourning is happening in the homes.”

African Americans struggle with disproportionate COVID death toll
National Geographic

Dr. Keith Ferdinand, professor of medicine at Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans, said numerous variables are making African Americans more vulnerable to COVID-19.
 
The South's Handling Of Coronavirus Could Be 'A Macabre Game Of Whack-A-Mole'
NPR

"I think that we could be heading for a macabre game of whack-a-mole," says Thomas LaVeist, dean of the School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine at Tulane University in New Orleans.
 
Southern States, Moving To Reopen, Could Be Most Vulnerable
NPR

Thomas LaVeist is dean of the School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine at Tulane University in New Orleans. He worries that Louisiana, an early hot spot for COVID-19, could see a resurgence in infection as surrounding states ease restrictions.

Louisiana's COVID-19 disparity 'slapping people in the face' and they're still 'trying to ignore it'
Daily Kos

Thomas LaVeist, dean of Tulane University's School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, told NOLA.com that the new data points to a truth “we should all be ashamed of.”
 
Breathing 'Rheum' in COVID-19 Hotspots: New Orleans finds new 'camaraderie' amid economic bust
Healio Rheumatology

Healio Rheumatology sat down with Madelaine A. Feldman, MD, president of the Coalition of State Rheumatology Organizations and clinical assistant professor of medicine at Tulane University School of Medicine, to discuss everything from challenges facing rheumatologists in New Orleans to the mood on the street in the city.
 
A rampage through the body
Science

All of the patients shared one thing, says Denson, a pulmonary and critical care physician at the Tulane University School of Medicine. “They are all COVID positive.”

Virus Researchers Cast Doubt On Theory Of Coronavirus Lab Accident
NPR

Regardless, genetic analysis shows the virus began to spread sometime in the fall or winter of 2019, says Robert Garry, a microbiologist at Tulane University.
 
Jazz funerals silenced: How New Orleans grieves amid coronavirus
Tennessean

“You can trace the impact of the health crisis in New Orleans by the silence of the city — no brass bands, no funerals, no church services happening,” said Tulane University ethnomusicologist Matt Sakakeeny.
 
The Learning Bulletin Board
New York Times

And at Tulane, students are sending in videos describing what they love and miss about the university.
 
COVID-19 count revisions in China suggest it's more contagious than thought
UPI

"It's good to see the 'corrections' that this paper makes," Dr. Robert F. Garry, a professor of life sciences at Tulane University and an infectious disease expert, told UPI.

Southern states largely go it alone in reopening decisions
AP News (and over 250 other outlets, including the Washington Post)

The outbreak has hit different parts of the country in different ways — and the response has been just as varied — so there isn’t one playbook, said Dr. Richard Oberhelman, an infectious disease specialist at Tulane University’s School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine in New Orleans.
 
Critical care physician warns against re-opening America too quickly
Fox News

Tulane Medical Center's critical care physician Dr. Joshua Denson joins Neil Cavuto on 'Your World.'
 
Even With COVID-19 Cases, Suing Cruise Lines Is 'Extraordinarily Difficult'
NPR

Martin Davies, an expert on maritime law at Tulane University, expects cruise lines to cite the Death on the High Seas Act when asking the courts to limit awards.
 
Georgia's Covid-19 reopening pits white governor against black mayors
The Guardian

The US south presents the “perfect storm of characteristics to just be a tragic region in terms of the Covid outbreak”, said Thomas LaVeist, dean of public health and tropical medicine at Tulane University.
 
US blames China for delayed virus response, but pulls funding from World Health Organization
ABC News

"Our analyses, and others too, point to an earlier origin than that. There were definitely cases there, but that wasn't the origin of the virus," Dr. Robert Garry, a professor at Tulane University School of Medicine and one of the authors, told ABC News at the time.
 
First US COVID-19 Deaths Happened Weeks Earlier than Thought
The Scientist Magazine

Speaking to The New York Times in early April, Geraldine Ménard, the chief of general internal medicine at Tulane Medical Center in New Orleans, said that staff had recorded “a ton of patients with pneumonia” earlier in the year.

'The last flag bearers of an era': how coronavirus threatens a generation of black Americans
The Guardian

Meanwhile, the south presents the “perfect storm of characteristics to just be a tragic region in terms of the Covid outbreak,” said Thomas LaVeist, dean of public health and tropical medicine at Tulane University.
 
Pediatricians show their mettle as coronavirus sweeps the nation
American Academy of Pediatrics

“For me, it’s been a bit of a struggle knowing how to reach families and trying to address the full breath of their needs. I worry so much about the economic impact on families,” said Dr. Mukerjee, assistant professor of clinical pediatrics and director of Immigrant and Refugee Health, Section of Community Pediatrics and Immigrant Health at Tulane University School of Medicine.

How do we know where viruses come from? Experts share how they solve the mystery
Miami Herald

“That’s just in the comic books and movies,” Robert Garry, a professor in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at the Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans, told McClatchy News.

Commentary: Racism is the other virus sweeping America during this pandemic
Chicago Tribune

The research team was comprised of a group of doctors, including Gilbert Gee from UCLA along with Thu Nguyen of UCSF, Shanise Criss of Furman University, Quyen Nguyen of the University of Maryland and David Chae of Tulane.
 
Trump Bungles Hit on Cuomo and Shatters Own Wrongness Record on “1917” Pandemic
The Intercept

If Trump were to crack open “The Great Influenza,” a history of that pandemic written by John Barry, an adjunct professor at Tulane University’s School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, he might be relieved to learn that his predecessor, Woodrow Wilson, was even more lax than he has been in response to a virus that killed an estimated 195,000 Americans in October of 1918 alone.
 
Caribbean professor promotes design thinking for region post-COVID
Jamaica Observer

“Education is an area in which design thinking can be used in the region. For example, a community could design an after-school programme that addresses a local problem, and then a government agency could support the implementation,” [Dr Lesley Ann Noel, professor of practice at The Taylor Center,] told the Business Observer.

How Covid-19 Is Making Millions of Americans Healthier
New York Times

Cooking as an element of good health is starting to catch on. A number of medical schools, such as George Washington University and Tulane University, now have culinary schools or culinary programs.

Scientists have strong evidence coronavirus originated naturally
ABC News

Dr. Robert Garry, a professor at the Tulane School of Medicine, authored one of the first major studies that refutes theories that COVID-19 was engineered as a biological weapon. He told ABC News the new focus of this research has been a special mutation that is thought to be what makes this coronavirus so contagious.
 
How does coronavirus kill? Clinicians trace a ferocious rampage through the body, from brain to toes
Science Magazine

Days earlier, his rounds had been interrupted as his team tried, and failed, to resuscitate a young woman whose heart had stopped. All shared one thing, says Denson, a pulmonary and critical care physician at the Tulane University School of Medicine. “They are all COVID positive.”

From mice to monkeys, animals studied for coronavirus answers
Science Magazine

The group swaps the latest data and tips, such as the efficiency of different infection routes and the most likely places to find the pathogen in animals. “Everybody has been thrown into a rush to get an animal model that's faithful to the human condition and reproducible,” says Chad Roy of the Tulane National Primate Research Center.

Catholic Church urges Venezuela to unite against coronavirus
The Conversation

David Smilde, Professor of Sociology, Tulane University

Desperate for more N95 masks, researchers test decontamination measures
PBS

Angie Birnbaum: As a biosafety professional, I never thought that I'd be in a situation where we're actually questioning how to decontaminate N95 masks. But this is where we are during this pandemic.
 
Old maritime rules pose obstacles to lawsuits from Princess Cruise passengers
NBC News

Passengers who are seeking damages from cruise lines may have a difficult time proving companies failed to meet the "reasonable care" standard the Supreme Court set forth in Kermarec v. Compagnie General Transatlantique, said Martin Davies, director of Tulane University School of Law's Maritime Law Center.
 
To start reopening shuttered nations, we need this blood test
National Geographic

“I’ve gotten dozens of emails and contacts from people saying, I had this pretty serious respiratory illness back in January—can you test me to see if I actually had SARS-CoV-2?” says Robert Garry, a virologist at Tulane University who develops serological assays. “We need to go get blood from these people and see.”
 
The Spanish flu killed more than 50 million people. These lessons could help avoid a repeat with coronavirus
CNN

The 1918 pandemic killed many young adults who were otherwise healthy, said John M. Barry, professor at the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine.
 
Bibliophiles: What to read in a pandemic
Boston Globe

John M. Barry is the award-winning author of “The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic,” which recounts the devastating and, now, timely story of the 1918 Spanish Flu and its profound aftermath.

Scientists tap CRISPR’s search-and-detect skills to create a rapid Covid-19 test
STAT News

“I think the technology has potential, and I’m in favor of it,” said Robert Garry, a professor of virology at Tulane University who was not involved in the research. But, he added,“I think they oversold it a bit” in regard to the test’s accuracy and convenience.

Sorry, Immunity to Covid-19 Won't Be Like a Superpower
Wired

Tulane University virologist Robert Garry and his research group have seen some patients with Covid-19 mount the sort of immune response you’d expect from someone experiencing a second exposure to the same pathogen.

This small Louisiana parish has the highest death rate per capita for coronavirus in the country
CNN

Susan Hassig, an epidemiologist at Tulane University, has been studying the coronavirus data coming out of St. John and other river parishes. "It certainly gave me pause, because it was so high. And then I looked at all the parishes near it, and they were also elevated," she said. "In epidemiology, we call that an ecologic correlation.

College Board says there will be a digital SAT this fall if schools don't reopen
C
NN
Tulane University, the University of Washington, Northeastern University and others have said they're making testing optional for fall 2021 or longer.

Where Did This Coronavirus Originate? Virus Hunters Find Genetic Clues In Bats
NPR

"But that 4% difference is actually a pretty wide distance in evolutionary time. It could even be decades," says Dr. Robert F. Garry, professor of microbiology and immunology at Tulane University School of Medicine.

What caused the coronavirus? A skeptical take on the theories about the outbreak’s Chinese origin.
Washington Post

Robert Garry, a virologist at Tulane University in New Orleans, later told Science News in March that the virus was fundamentally unlike something that would have been designed. “It has too many distinct features, some of which are counterintuitive,” he said.

With 3D Design Know-How, This Neurologist Is Working to Produce Face Shields, Gowns, Sanitizers for COVID-19
Neuorology Today

Dr. [Korak] Sarkar is also a staff neurologist at the New Orleans Veteran Affairs Hospital and adjunct professor in the Tulane department of biomedical engineering.

Inequity, Not Genetics, the Main Factor in Covid Death Rates for Black Americans
Courthouse News Service

“Black people disproportionately have the type of jobs that put you at risk,” said Thomas LaVeist, the dean of the Tulane University School of Public Health.

The Coronavirus Generation
The Atlantic

Even so, Reggie Ferreira, a social-work professor and the director of the Disaster Resilience Leadership Academy at Tulane University, told me he expects there will be “definitely an increase” in people seeking education post-quarantine, taking advantage of loan availability to acquire expertise that might better position them to build a stable life.

Guest column: Build the early-detection structure that will fight the next coronavirus
The Advocate

Mike Fitts is president of Tulane University and Tom LaVeist is dean of Tulane’s School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine.

Walter Isaacson: This is going to be a new century of biotechnology
CNBC

CNBC Contributor Walter Isaacson, Tulane, on what society will look like when this ends.

Public statement for collaboration on COVID-19 vaccine development
World Health Organization

Chad J Roy, Tulane National Primate Research Center and Tulane School of Medicine, USA

'I'm scared for my child': Coronavirus hits Louisiana juvenile detention centers
NBC News

Julia Fleckman, a professor at Tulane University’s School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, said that bringing in additional employees could exacerbate the spread of the coronavirus.

Mice, hamsters, ferrets, monkeys. Which lab animals can help defeat the new coronavirus?
Science Magazine

“Everybody has been thrown into a rush to get an animal model that’s faithful to the human condition and reproducible,” says Chad Roy, a monkey researcher at the Tulane National Primate Research Center. “I don’t want to say it’s enjoyable because it’s a tough time right now, but it’s a refreshing way to approach this problem.”

'A perfect storm': poverty and race add to Covid-19 toll in US deep south
The Guardian

“The south has the perfect storm of characteristics to just be a tragic region in terms of the Covid outbreak,” said Thomas LaVeist, dean of public health and tropical medicine at Tulane University.

Congo Was Close to Defeating Ebola. Then One More Case Emerged.
New York Times

“Producing the vaccines and rolling them out under extremely trying conditions was one of the things that was done well in the Congo outbreak,” said Robert F. Garry Jr., co-director of the Center for Viral Systems Biology at Tulane University. “It was a major breakthrough.”

LA gov extends state's stay-at-home order under April 30
Fox News

Associate Professor at Tulane University Dr. Susan Hassig responds to Louisiana Governor Edward's recent actions amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Edwards creating task force on virus’s racial disparities
AP News

The governor said the group will involve researchers and health experts from Southern University, Xavier University, Louisiana State University, Tulane University, the state health department, the Pennington Biomedical Research Center and nursing schools around Louisiana.

How a pandemic struck a British PM and changed the world. No, not this one
CBC News

"No one can know what would have happened [had Wilson remained healthy]," writes Barry, professor at the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine in New Orleans.

Prestigious scientific panel tells White House coronavirus won't go away with warmer weather
CNN

The letter describes how Chad Roy, a researcher at Tulane University, subjected the virus to hot and humid temperatures in the laboratory, and studied it for 16 hours.

Southern Mayors Pushed GOP Governors to Take Action on Coronavirus. Governors Pushed Back.
The Intercept

“What you have is the perfect storm: people that are already marginalized socially, people that have fewer economic resources and states that have fewer resources,” said Thomas LaVeist, dean of Tulane University’s School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. “I’m very fearful.”

Across the South, ‘Walking a Tightrope’ While Awaiting the Worst
New York Times

“Poor people don’t have access to good food,”, said Dr. Susan Hassig, an associate professor at the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine in Louisiana.

SARS-CoV-2 May Confound Seasons, Persist in Warmer Months, Report Shows
Medscape

Chad Roy, PhD, a researcher from Tulane University National Primate Research Center in New Orleans, Louisiana, told Relman by phone that in experiments where the virus was suspended as an aerosol at a temperature of 23°C (73.4°F) and about 50% humidity, SARS-CoV-2 had a longer half-life than the influenza virus, SARS-CoV-1, monkeypox virus, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

In New Orleans, A Field Hospital For A COVID-19 Surge Officials Hope Won’t Come
Huffington Post

“There’s not a hospital locally that I believe is not rationing,” said Joshua Denson, pulmonary and critical care physician at Tulane Medical Center.

Why it’s too early to start giving out “immunity passports”
MIT Technology Review

“It really depends on what your purpose is,” says Robert Garry, a virologist at Tulane University. Sensitivity and specificity rates of 95% or higher, he says, are considered a high benchmark, but those numbers are difficult to hit; 90% is considered clinically useful, and 80 to 85% is epidemiologically useful.

'No miraculous recovery': Some ICU doctors say hydroxychloroquine isn't helping sickest patients
NBC News

In Louisiana, Dr. Josh Denson, a pulmonary medicine and critical care physician at the Tulane University Medical Center in New Orleans, said that "many patients do fine and tolerate it, but I don't think it's making a difference."

The birth of a pandemic: How COVID-19 went from Wuhan to Toronto
National Post

"I’ve never heard anyone satisfactorily explain why so little has been written about this,” said John M. Barry, author of The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History and a professor at the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. “(American author) John Dos Passos, for example, got influenza while on a troop ship, and they were floating coffins, yet he hardly wrote a word about it.”

Clear vision: Program provides ski goggles to medical staff
Associated Press (and over 100 other outlets, including Washington Post)

Marcia Glass, an associate professor of internal medicine at Tulane University, has used the goggles while treating patients. “Super helpful, much better than regular eye gear,” she wrote in an email.

Louisiana family said final goodbye to Air Force vet on FaceTime
NY Post

Dr. David Doukas, a bioethicist at Tulane University who works in end-of-life care, said barring relatives from their loved ones during their final moments is a necessary move during pandemics.

Scores of ‘probable’ coronavirus deaths not counted in NYC tally
NY Post

“If deaths aren’t a reliable marker, then we are in really big trouble,” said Susan Hassig, an associate professor of epidemiology at Tulane University in New Orleans.

‘A crisis within a crisis’: Black Americans face higher rates of coronavirus deaths
LA Times

Dr. Joshua Denson, an intensivist at Tulane Medical Center in New Orleans, said he had seen many African American patients with COVID-19 in recent weeks, many with preexisting conditions that made them vulnerable, like obesity and diabetes.

New Orleans convention center prepares to start accepting thousands of coronavirus patients after death rate surged to the highest in the US at almost DOUBLE that of NYC
Daily Mail

'It's an easy scapegoat to say, oh, Louisiana is doing poorly on deaths per hospitalization because this is an obese population, they are Southerners, they are ill,' Tulane University health economist Engy Ziedan said to the Journal.

‘Nothing Works’: Hospitals Race To Train More Docs To Operate Ventilators
Talking Points Memo

Denson, the Tulane doctor, is treating dozens of COVID-19 patients at his hospital. “It’s kind of like Groundhog’s Day, but the sun is never coming through,” he said, adding that a respiratory therapist he works with had coined a term: “the corona shuffle.”

Can Tulane University’s monkeys help the global fight against the coronavirus?
Public Radio International

“There are very few places in the world that have the capabilities that we have,” said Jay Rappaport, director of Tulane’s National Primate Research Center. “Everything that you can imagine that you would need to address this epidemic is really here.”

New Orleans area's coronavirus death rate is highest in US, data show
Fox News

But ill health is only part of the picture, Tulane University health economist Engy Ziedan told The Journal.

Official Counts Understate the U.S. Coronavirus Death Toll
New York Times

“When I was working before we had testing, we had a ton of patients with pneumonia,” said Geraldine Ménard, chief of general internal medicine at Tulane Medical Center in New Orleans. “I remember thinking it was weird. I’m sure some of those patients did have it. But no one knew back then.”

Why Coronavirus Is Killing New Orleans Area Residents At Possibly The Highest Rate In The U.S.
Forbes

“It’s an easy scapegoat to say, oh, Louisiana is doing poorly on deaths per hospitalization because this is an obese population, they are Southerners, they are ill,” Tulane health economist Engy Ziedan told the Wall Street Journal, noting that preexisting health concerns are only part of the problem.

Top tips on how to make working from home safe
Fox News

Double-check the validity of links before clicking, especially those purporting to provide information on the COVID-19 virus, Ralph Russo, an expert and director of information technology programs in Tulane University's School of Professional Advancement, told Fox News.

Louisiana hospitals, medical staff stretched thin amid virus
AP News

Dr. David Becnel, a pulmonary critical care doctor at the Tulane University School of Medicine, sees patients at three New Orleans-area hospitals and said all are trying to get more ventilators as supplies shrink. Hospitals are looking at using one ventilator for more than one person or retrofitting other breathing devices into ventilators, in case that’s needed.

People coming to New Orleans to help fight coronavirus can stay at Tulane
WWL Radio

“I cannot think of a better use for this temporarily vacated space than making it available to shelter those who are coming to our aid during this crisis,” Tulane President Mike Fitts said. “We want to do what we can to help these heroes as they bring healing and comfort to our community.”

Louisiana hospitals, medical staff stretched thin amid virus
AP News

Dr. David Becnel, a pulmonary critical care doctor at the Tulane University School of Medicine, sees patients at three New Orleans-area hospitals and said all are trying to get more ventilators as supplies shrink. Hospitals are looking at using one ventilator for more than one person or retrofitting other breathing devices into ventilators, in case that’s needed.
 
Official Counts Understate the U.S. Coronavirus Death Toll
New York Times

“When I was working before we had testing, we had a ton of patients with pneumonia,” said Geraldine Ménard, chief of general internal medicine at Tulane Medical Center in New Orleans. “I remember thinking it was weird. I’m sure some of those patients did have it. But no one knew back then.”
 
Why Coronavirus Is Killing New Orleans Area Residents At Possibly The Highest Rate In The U.S.
Forbes

“It’s an easy scapegoat to say, oh, Louisiana is doing poorly on deaths per hospitalization because this is an obese population, they are Southerners, they are ill,” Tulane health economist Engy Ziedan told the Wall Street Journal, noting that preexisting health concerns are only part of the problem.
 
Top tips on how to make working from home safe
Fox News

Double-check the validity of links before clicking, especially those purporting to provide information on the COVID-19 virus, Ralph Russo, an expert and director of information technology programs in Tulane University's School of Professional Advancement, told Fox News.
 
Equity and distance learning can go together
NY Daily News

Some critics are still skeptical, among them Economist Douglas Harris of Tulane University, who insists: “Even if every teacher could teach every student online, it still wouldn’t be as good as doing it in person."
 
Was it flu or the coronavirus? FDA authorizes first COVID-19 antibody test
Washington Times

Cindy Morris, left, and Swarnamala Ratnayaka prepare RNA for testing for the new coronavirus at the molecular pathology lab at Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans, Thursday, April 2, 2020.
 
Top tips on how to make working from home safe
MSN

Double-check the validity of links before clicking, especially those purporting to provide information on the COVID-19 virus, Ralph Russo, an expert and director of information technology programs in Tulane University's School of Professional Advancement, told Fox News.
 
Was That Cough You Had Last November or December COVID-19?
Snopes

Robert Garry, an infectious disease expert at Tulane University who has published on the origins of SARS-CoV-2, told Snopes by email that the notion was “very unlikely” but that without rigorous, global serological testing (in short, examining blood samples for antibodies), we won’t have enough evidence to rule out that possibility:
 
What Are the Early Symptoms of Coronavirus? [COVID-19]
Heavy.com

“Patients tend to have symptoms for about a week before either getting better, or getting really sick,” Dr. Joshua Denson, who works at Tulane Medical Center in New Orleans, told NBC.
 
New Orleans: COVID-19 Hotspot, Epicenter of Hope
Black Enterprise

Much of the research that is informing public health policy occurs right here at Tulane’s School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine...

March 2020

What The US Could Learn From Nigeria’s Response To The COVID-19 Coronavirus Outbreak
Forbes

Adaora Okoli is a Nigerian doctor, currently working as an internal medicine resident at Tulane University in New Orleans and she said Nigeria’s experience with multiple infectious diseases including Ebola cut both ways.

Coronavirus Is Bad in the Cities. It Could Be Even Worse Outside of Them
Vice

Right now, Joshua Denson, a pulmonary critical care doctor at the Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans, is quarantined. “We are frontline providers for this disease,” Denson said. “I’m on a quarantine right now, that takes out one. We have 10 to 11 providers covering three or four hospitals.”

Coronavirus tests: researchers chase new diagnostics to fight the pandemic
Nature

“Right now it’s clear we’re only seeing the tip of the iceberg: people who are so sick they need hospitalization or intensive care,” says Robert Garry, a virologist at Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans, Louisiana.

'A slow burn': Coronavirus symptoms often linger before worsening
NBC News

"Patients tend to have symptoms for about a week before either getting better, or getting really sick," said Dr. Joshua Denson, a pulmonary medicine and critical care physician at Tulane Medical Center in New Orleans.

Once and for All, the New Coronavirus Was Not Made in a Lab
Vice

“Seeing that in the new SARS-CoV-2 when those sequences came out for the first time actually kept me up all night,” said Bob Garry, an assistant professor of microbiology and immunology at Tulane University School of Medicine and co-author of the Nature paper.

New Orleans' 'Let the good times roll' now 'Wash your hands'
AP News (and over 250 other outlets)

Whether Mardi Gras crowds were a factor in the disease’s spread in Louisiana cannot be proven, but the celebration would be a likely breeding ground for a highly contagious virus like the one that causes COVID-19, said Dr. Richard Oberhelman. He is the chairman of the Department of Global Community Health and Behavioral Sciences at Tulane University’s School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine.

Who's getting sick from coronavirus? Adults of all ages, and people with chronic health problems
NBC News

Dr. Joshua Denson, a pulmonary and critical care medicine physician at Tulane Medical Center in New Orleans, saw his first patient with the coronavirus just over a week ago. He's now diagnosed nearly 20 such patients, and many if not all have come into the hospital with a specific set of chronic health conditions.

How to maintain your mental health while working from home
Fast Company

As a result, it’s essential to be as patient as possible, says Maurya Glaude, PhD, an assistant professor at Tulane University’s School of Social Work in New Orleans. This is not the time to expect perfection.

New Coronavirus Wasn't Made in a Lab, Study Shows
Web MD

The research was a collaborative, international effort: Andersen was joined by scientists from Columbia University in New York City, the University of Sydney in Australia, and Tulane University in New Orleans.

10 Things African Americans Need To Know About Protecting Themselves From Coronavirus
BET

Dr. Corey Hebert, chief medical officer at Dillard University and an assistant professor at Tulane and Louisiana State Universities, is the chief medical editor at WDSU in New Orleans. He is on the frontlines of educating people on ways to combat the illness including how to make sure you don’t get it and what to do if you do.

The Single Most Important Lesson From the 1918 Influenza
New York Times

John M. Barry is the author of “The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History” and a professor at the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine.

U.S. coronavirus death toll passes 100
Washington Post

At Tulane Medical Center in New Orleans, John Dwyer, an infectious-disease specialist and an assistant professor of medicine, said this week that he was already seeing a disturbing harbinger of what is to come.

How long will COVID-19 last?
Popular Science

“Early in an epidemic the butterfly effect is very real,” says Mac Hyman, a mathematician at Tulane University in New Orleans who worked on forecasts for how the new coronavirus would spread in China. “It matters [if] the first person infected is a bus driver or someone who stays at home.”

Is COVID-19 Coronavirus A Bioweapon From A Lab? Here Is What Debunks This Theory
Forbes

In the letter, a research team (Kristian G. Andersen from The Scripps Research Institute, Andrew Rambaut from the University of Edinburgh, W. Ian Lipkin from the Mailman School of Public Health of Columbia University, Edward C. Holmes from The University of Sydney and Robert F. Garry from Tulane University) described how they had analyzed the genetic sequences that code for the protein spikes on the surface of SARS-CoV2.

Mathematicians say preventative measures could have huge impact on coronavirus spread
ABC News

“There’s a caveat there,” said Dr. Mac Hyman, a professor in mathematics at Tulane University. “If no one changes their behavior in the next month, then it could result in a million cases. But if people change the way that they interact to both protect themselves from being infected and infecting others – then it could actually decrease.”

Coronavirus Self-Quarantine: Who Needs To Do It And For How Long?
Independent

“Isolation is what you do for people who are sick,” Susan Hassig, an epidemiologist at Tulane who studies infectious diseases and public health, told Nola. “Quarantine means you recognise you have been exposed.”

Dr. Corey Hebert explains the concept of ‘flattening the curve’ of coronavirus spread
CNBC

Dr. Corey Hebert, assistant professor with LSU and Tulane University and CEO of Community Health TV, joins “Squawk Box” to discuss the U.S. fight against coronavirus.

Coronavirus: What to Stock up on So You’re Prepared
MSN

Rather than panicking and buying more than you need, it’s about being adequately stocked: “Just in case we need to shelter in place, or in case stores have limited supplies,” says Dr. David Mushatt, chief of adult infectious diseases at Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans.

Stocking Up for the Coronavirus: What You Need
U.S. News
Rather than panicking and buying more than you need, it’s about being adequately stocked: “Just in case we need to shelter in place, or in case stores have limited supplies,” says Dr. David Mushatt, chief of adult infectious diseases at Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans.

Fed faces headache, taps epidemiologists in hunt for policy clues
New York Times
"The amount of extra information that they'll have in the next few days, until these tests are widely available, is going to be minimal," said Mac Hyman, a professor of mathematics at Tulane University, who is an expert in epidemic modeling.

The 1918 flu pandemic, a cautionary tale
CBS News
"That's equivalent to 225 to 450 million people today," said John Barry, who wrote a history of the 1918 flu and is on the adjunct faculty of Tulane University. "The numbers are staggering.

Lessons From History On How News Spreads During An Outbreak, And How Social Media Can Help
Forbes
"I am concerned by a report I saw on Twitter on March 3, 2020 about a Washington Post story that the World Health Organization is reporting that the death rate for COVID-19 is 3.4%," said Thomas LaVeist, dean of the School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine at Tulane University. "That is an extremely high death rate and it is probably an overestimate," warned LaVeist. "I am concerned that it will unnecessarily alarm people."

10 Coronavirus Prevention Tips To Help Stop The Spread, Every Single Day
Romper
It could be more concerning if someone with chronic lung or heart disease, immunosuppression, or cancer develops symptoms of coronavirus, Dr. John Schieffelin, a pediatric infectious disease specialist from Tulane University School of Medicine, tells Romper.

When Should You See A Doctor For Coronavirus Symptoms?
Romper
The risk is currently very low," Dr. John Schieffelin, a pediatric infectious disease specialist from Tulane University School of Medicine, tells Romper.

America's Coronavirus Virus: Psychology Of Panic And Stockpiling
Patch
The advice isn't a doomsday harbinger, but rather a caution against risking infecting others by going to pick up those items when you're sick, says Dr. Ronald Blanton, whose specialties at the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine include global health.

From ferrets to mice and marmosets, labs scramble to find right animals for coronavirus studies
STAT
“This initial study is just to find out whether these species of animals can be infected, whether they demonstrate the clinical signs, whether they have an immune response … where the virus is shed, whether it’s in urine, tears, feces, blood,” said Skip Bohm, chief veterinary medical officer at Tulane University’s National Primate Research Center, in Covington, Louisiana.

The US Federal Reserve is taking its lead from epidemiologists over coronavirus crisis
World Economic Forum
“The amount of extra information that they’ll have in the next few days, until these tests are widely available, is going to be minimal,” said Mac Hyman, a professor of mathematics at Tulane University, who is an expert in epidemic modeling.

Coronavirus Shock Tests the Airline Industry’s Cash ‘Fortress’
Bloomberg
Mark Powers, a Tulane University business professor and former chief financial officer at JetBlue and Etihad Airways PJSC, said the airline industry learned some hard lessons in the years after the Great Recession—and acted accordingly. “The industry decided that the bad balance sheet model doesn’t work,” he said. “Today you’re just talking about [earnings] impact.”

President Trump’s coronavirus media criticism is misplaced » Ben Carson doesn’t have any answers for George Stephanopoulos
Poynter
Tulane University professor John Barry, who has written extensively about the 1918 flu, said, “I think more people will die, yeah. Clearly that was the case in 1918. People can deal with the truth. It’s the unknown that’s much scarier.”

Extreme actions during Spanish flu may preview decisions on coronavirus today
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
John Barry, a Tulane University scholar and author of “The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History," said he supports social distancing but is not as big a believer in it as computer modelers.

February 2020

Tulane University to develop vaccine for novel coronavirus
Pharmaceutical Technology

Tulane University researchers in the US have announced plans to develop a vaccine and diagnostics for the novel coronavirus disease, officially named COVID-19.

China's coronavirus survivors may face mental hurdles once outbreak ends
Fox National News

“Social support is a buffer and protective factor, so being in a state of isolation could make it very difficult to mourn loss and start with the grieving process,” Dr. Reggie Ferreira, associate professor at Tulane University within the School of Social Work, told Fox News. 

These are the best ways to avoid catching the coronavirus on airplanes, experts say
CNBC

Speaking to CNBC’s “Squawk Box” last week, Dr. Corey Hebert, assistant professor at both Louisiana State and Tulane Universities, also said the face masks that were sold at regular drug stores wouldn’t help because viruses could move through the mesh.

Can this virus be contained? Probably not.
Washington Post

John M. Barry column about the emerging epidemic.