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Admission & Aid

There are 13,500 students at Tulane. Every last one of them has been exactly where you are right now: Wondering if Tulane is the right fit. Wondering if the programs here are what you’re looking for. And—­let’s be honest—wondering how you’re going to pay for this.

We helped them. And we’ll help you.

 

 

Ladee Hubbard, an adjunct lecturer in the Africana Studies program, is set to discuss her debut novel, “The Talented Ribkins,” on “Late Night With Seth Meyers” this fall.
Novelist to discuss super debut with Seth Meyers

Ladee Hubbard, an adjunct lecturer in the Tulane School of Liberal Arts, will discuss her debut novel, The Talented Ribkins, on “Late Night with Seth Meyers” this fall.

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Tulane students explain their dorm style in today’s infographic featuring some of this year’s most stylish rooms on the uptown campus.
Decor turns dorms into home away from home

Tulane students explain their dorm style in today’s infographic featuring some of this year’s most stylish rooms on the uptown campus.

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Tulane University’s admitted first-year students for the fall of 2017 are the most diverse and academically qualified in Tulane’s history. Learn more about them in this infographic.
Meet the Class of 2021

Tulane University’s admitted first-year students for the fall of 2017 are the most diverse and academically qualified in Tulane’s history. Learn more about them in this infographic.

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A rising sophomore at Tulane, James Rogers spent his summer as an intern at the National Institutes of Health where he conducted research on the total number of mutations found in a small subset of rare central nervous system tumor patients.
Tulane student spends summer conducting vital tumor research at NIH

Rising sophomore James Rogers was selected for an internship at the National Institutes of Health and worked in the Neuro-Oncology Branch of the National Cancer Institute.

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Right Here, Right Now

Want a glimpse of Tulane from where you’re sitting? Check out our social media for real-time updates from campus. We have all the usual suspects: ­ Instagram, Twitter, Facebook ­ and a bunch of others. It’s Tulane in a nutshell: Real. Live. And it probably includes something about food, because this is New Orleans and you know it’s good to live here.

Financial Aid

Last year, Tulane students received $118 million in grants and scholarships. That includes both merit aid, which you earn based on your academic performance, and need­-based aid, which you get by demonstrating financial need.

Almost every single student with a demonstrated financial need—99.3 percent—received need-based aid. On average, students with demonstrated need received more than $40,000 each. In all, 79 percent of our first-­year students were offered aid.

Want merit aid? You don’t have to do anything—all applicants are considered. If you’d like to be considered for need­-based aid, though, you must fill out a FAFSA form.

Undergraduate and Graduate Admission

Nearly half of our students are undergraduates. They’re here for the programs (we offer 70 majors and minors), they’re here for the city (The Princeton Review says we’re the #2 College City, woohoo! We think they’re only off by one.), they’re here because they’ve heard it’s great when a professor actually knows you by name (average class size: 21), they’re here because it’s easy to get away (a third of our students study abroad). Whatever their reason, we’ll help you find yours.

Our admission office works directly with undergrads. Every school at Tulane, though, sets its own graduate admission policies. If you’re coming for graduate work, reach out to those schools directly.

Average financial aid package (including gift aid, loans and work-study) awarded to 2016-17 entering first-year students with financial need: $45,312.

The Class of 2021 represents one of the most diverse and academically qualified in Tulane's history. 22 percent are students of color and five percent are international students. Seven students have a perfect ACT score, nine have a perfect SAT score and 191 never got less than an A through their high school careers.

About a third of undergraduate students study abroad. Programs range for as little as 4 week to a full year. Students can choose from more than 80 university-approved courses of study in about 30 countries.