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courses
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Graduate courses

TRMD 6010 BIOLOGICAL BASIS OF DISEASE (3)
Professor: Mark Wiser. Offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer. This course provides a foundation of knowledge about the human body in health and disease. It gives an overview of important concepts of the biological mechanisms of disease at the cellular, individual, and societal levels. At the cellular level, the course summarizes DNA and cellular function, genomics, immunology, and vaccination. At the individual and societal levels, the course addresses the most important infectious and non-infectious causes of death worldwide, providing background on their pathophysiology, clinical aspects, patterns of disease occurrence, risk factors, and methods of prevention. See Learning Objectives

TRMD 6050 MEDICAL HELMINTHOLOGY (2)
Professor: Susan McLellan. Offered in Fall. The study of parasitic worms with special reference to those causing human disease. In lecture and laboratory, the student is acquainted with the different groups of helminths, their zoological classification, structural characteristics, life cycles, geographic distribution, methods of transmission, reservoir hosts, location, and tissue damage produced in the human body; host's immunologic responses; laboratory diagnosis and methods of treatment and control.  See Learning Objectives

TRMD 6060 MEDICAL ENTOMOLOGY (3)
Professor: Dawn Wesson. Offered in Spring. Designed to provide the fundamental information necessary for understanding the role of arthropods in the transmission of pathogens causing human disease. Following a brief review of the general anatomy, physiology, and classification of arthropods, individual groups of medical importance are considered in detail in regard to the recognition of important species, the epidemiology and pathogenesis of associated diseases, and the principles and methods of vector control. Lectures, demonstrations, and laboratory exercises. A $50.00 lab fee is assessed for this course. See Learning Objectives

TRMD 6070 MEDICAL PROTOZOOLOGY (2)
Professor: Mark Wiser. Offered in Fall. Prerequisite: Undergraduate biology course. The basic biology of protozoa capable of infecting humans as well as the clinical manifestations of the diseases they cause will be covered. Topics covered will include life cycles, morphological features, host-parasite interactions, geographical distribution, reservoir hosts, methods of transmission and control, pathology, immunological aspects, and laboratory and clinical diagnosis. The biological and clinical perspectives gained in this course will assist students in the practical recognition, evaluation, and management of problems in public health or clinical practice involving protozoa that infect humans. See Learning Objectives

TRMD 6080 MEDICAL PROTOZOOLOGY LABORATORY (1)
Professor: Mark Wiser. Offered in Spring. This course provides students with training in the use of a microscope and the identification of medically important protozoa in fecal, blood, tissue, and other specimens. Laboratory exercises will focus upon the detection and recognition of parasitic protozoa in prepared samples. Students will learn how to distinguish the various protozoa which infect humans and be able to identify protozoa in clinical and histological preparations. A $50.00 lab fee is assessed for this course.  See Learning Objectives

TRMD 6090 PARASITOLOGY Lab (1)
Professors: Mark Wiser and Susan McLellan. Offered in Spring. The identification of medically important parasites relies heavily upon macroscopic and microscopic examination of clinical specimens. In this course students will learn the basic principles of identifying parasitic helminthes and protozoa in blood, feces, and tissue specimens. Prepared specimens of the major helminth and protozoan pathogens of humans will be provided for macroscopic and microscopic examination. Students will learn the basic operations of the microscope and how to identify and distinguish the various helminthes and protozoa. Samples demonstrating the pathological features of the disease will also be provided. The techniques for preparing diagnostic specimens of parasites in blood and feces will be reviewed. A $50.00 lab fee is assessed for this course. See Learning Objectives

TRMD 6100 HEALTH AND HUMAN RIGHTS (1)
Professor: Daniel Bausch. Offered in Spring and Summer. This course is designed to provide a forum for discussion of pertinent issues in global health and human rights and to motivate students to become active advocates for their resolution. Students will participate in daily discussions with local and national experts in public health, clinical medicine, and health sciences research who are also strong advocates for human rights. The speakers will stress the importance of addressing the underlying social, political, and economic factors influencing health. Speakers will give examples from their background and the motivations for their career choices and discuss the skills and strategies necessary to become effective advocates for health and human rights. See Learning Objectives

TRMD 6170 IMMUNOLOGY (3)
Professor: Geetha Bansal. Offered in Fall. Designed for students of medicine and allied health fields with the aim of providing information necessary for understanding the immune system. Following a comprehensive consideration of both cellular and humoral immunity and the complement system, attention is given to the role of the immune system in resistance to infection and the pathogenesis of disease.  See Learning Objectives

TRMD 6200 IMPACT EVALUATION IN GLOBAL HEALTH (3)
Professor: Joseph Keating. Offered in Fall. This course introduces students to the basic concepts, principles, and practices for the evaluation of public health programs and interventions. It focuses on impact evaluation of infectious disease programs and interventions. Lectures, discussion, and assignments will highlight evaluation strategies for health promotion and disease-specific prevention and cotnrol interventions in international settings. The course is intended to 1) introduce students to impact evaluation, 2) provide a solid grounding foundation in study designs relevant for evaluation, 3) develop students' skills in designing evaluation plans, and 4) serve as a foundation for more specialized evaluation classes such as data analysis, sampling, epidemiology, and advanced evaluation research. See Learning Objectives

TRMD 6310 CLINICAL TROPICAL MEDICINE (2)
Professor: Susan McLellan. Offered in Fall. Physicians, nurses, or senior medical students only. This course provides a substantial introduction to the major diseases of tropical and developing countries. Emphasis is placed on important parasitic diseases, gastroenteritis, and vaccine preventable diseases. Course material focuses on the etiology, pathogenesis, symptomatology, diagnosis, and treatment of these diseases; epidemiological characteristics, control methods, and current research directions are also described. Lectures feature recognized authorities with firsthand experience in the tropics.  See Learning Objectives

TRMD 6330 MICROBIAL DISEASES OF THE TROPICS (2)
Professor: Latha Rajan. Offered in Fall. This course introduces students to the most important bacterial, viral, and mycotic pathogens in the tropics and to clinical features of the associated diseases. The course will focus on topics not ordinarily covered in depth in U.S. medical schools, such as cholera, tuberculosis, leprosy, arboviral infections, and hemorrhagic fevers, among others. The course will be team taught by both microbiologists and clinicians. Topics covered will include geographic distribution, transmission, pathogenesis, clinical features of relevant diseases, immunologic considerations, laboratory diagnosis, treatment, and control.  See Learning Objectives

TRMD 6340 DIAGNOSTIC LABORATORY METHODS IN MICROBIOLOGY (2)
Professor: Margarita Silio. Offered in Fall and Spring. This laboratory course parallels topics presented in TRMD 633. The course is designed to teach students how to perform basic laboratory tests using simple techniques applicable to developing countries. Most of these will be diagnostic tests for infectious diseases, although some clinically relevant non-diagnostic techniques will also be taught (e.g., complete blood counts). The bulk of the course consists of hands-on laboratory experience conducting laboratory tests with clinical specimens and analyzing prepared teaching specimens. Procedures for organism isolation and identification and rapid diagnostic kits will be covered. A $50.00 lab fee is assessed for this course. See Learning Objectives

TRMD 6350 DISEASE PREVENTION AND CONTROL IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES (2)
Professors: Susan McLellan, Latha Rajan, and Margarita Silio. Offered in Fall and Spring. This course is designed to prepare students to recognize and contribute effectively to the public health needs of communities in developing countries. It includes four broad content areas: (1) concepts of disease prevention and control with special reference to developing countries, including types of surveillance, monitoring and control strategies, (2) analysis of community needs, and provision of basic preventative services; (3) prevention and control of important endemic diseases such as malaria, tuberculosis, vaccine-preventable diseases; and (4) other topics such as special needs populations, disaster/refugee health programs, sources of information, and local and international organizations and programs. The course will emphasize practical rather than theoretical considerations based on the needs of the practitioner working under relatively resource-poor conditions.  See Learning Objectives

TRMD 6360 CLINICAL TROPICAL MEDICINE CASE PRESENTATIONS (1)
Professor: Margarita Silio. Offered in Fall. Medical professionals only. Students and faculty present actual cases in tropical medicine, concentrating on differential diagnosis and case management. Cases will first be discussed based on history and physical exam alone (no lab data), followed by additional discussion of laboratory results. Subjects covered in case presentations include acute diarrhea, fevers, anemia, malnutrition, respiratory distress, and altered mental status.  See Learning Objectives

TRMD 6420 TROPICAL VIROLOGY (3)
Professor: Daniel Bausch. Offered in Spring. This course covers the broad area of virology with an emphasis on viruses of public health concern in developing and tropical countries. Both historically problematic and emerging viruses are covered. Topics include the molecular biology, epidemiology, and pathology of selected viruses. Focus is placed on developing an understanding of the molecular aspects of the viral life cycle that give rise to transmission and pathogenic characteristics, especially in the context of the co-evolution of the virus and host. Additional topics include the interactions between the virus and host immune response, as well as viral control and the development of vaccines and anti-viral pharmaceuticals.  See Learning Objectives

TRMD 6450 TUBERCULOSIS: GLOBAL TRENDS AND INTERACTIONS WITH HIV (2)
Professor: Latha Rajan. Offered in Spring. This course is designed as an overview of tuberculosis and the challenges posed by the dual epidemics of TB and HIV. The course comprises a series of lectures and case studies. Guest faculty are recognized experts in this area and bring extensive experience and case study material to the course.  Field activities including a visit to the Wetmore Tuberculosis Clinic at Charity Hospital and a visit to the Tuberculosis Control Program at the Office of Public Health are offered. The course includes three broad content areas – basic concepts of tuberculosis disease and epidemiology, clinical manifestations and management;  challenges posed by the interactions of Tuberculosis and HIV infection and global initiatives to integrate TB and HIV control programs; and issues in tuberculosis control with special reference to multidrug resistance, social aspects, and program strategies. The biological, clinical and programmatic perspectives gained from this course will assist students in interpretation and critique of programs and policies related to tuberculosis control. See Learning Objectives

TRMD 7000 TROPICAL MEDICINE SEMINAR (1)
Professor: Latha Rajan. Offered in Fall and Spring. Prerequisite: Clinical background. Tropical Medicine Seminar is designed as a journal club, with the specific goal of training students to develop skills in critically evaluating and effectively presenting relevant scientific literature. Each student is expected to present at least one article to the class from recent tropical medicine literature and to attend and actively participate during presentations delivered by other students.  See Learning Objectives

TRMD 7020 INFECTIOUS DISEASE SEMINAR (1)
Professor: Mark Wiser. Offered in Fall and Spring. The seminar experience for MSPH students (TRMD 702) and MPH&TM students (TRMD 700) is intended to stimulate a critical reading of the current literature and to ensure that each student learns to present important and potentially controversial data in a rigorous and careful fashion. See Learning Objectives

TRMD 7180 IMMUNOPARASITOLOGY (2)
Professor: Nirbhay Kumar. Offered in Spring. Prerequisite: TRMD 617. Designed to provide students of medicine, the basic sciences, and public health with an understanding of the role of immunity in parasitic infections. Special emphasis will be placed on current knowledge of mechanisms of immunity to protozoal and helminth infections that cause malaria, trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, schistosomiasis, and filariasis, some of the most widespread and debilitating diseases still plaguing the world. Additional topics may be covered according to student needs and trends in the field.  See Learning Objectives

TRMD 7300 MECHANISMS OF PATHOGEN INTERVENTION (2)
Professor: Ahmed Aly. Offered in Spring. Prerequisite: TRMD 6170. This course provides an advanced foundation of knowledge about the selection and mechanisms of action of different interventions against important viruses, bacteria, and unicellular parasites of public health significance. The course describes how drugs, vaccines, and other intervention agents reach their cellular targets and how they act in harmony with the host immune system to control or eradicate the pathogen, inside the human or arthropod hosts. See Learning Objectives

TRMD 7330 ADVANCED TOPICS IN HOST-PATHOGEN INTERACTIONS (2)
Professor: Juan Pizarro. Offered in Spring. Prerequisites: TRMD 6170, TRMD 6070, TRMD 6330. The course will provide both an overview and an update on the recent advances in the study of host-pathogen interaction at the cellular and molecular levels. The focus will be on pathogen molecules that mediate interactions with host (and vector, if applicable), and the role these interactions play in host recognition and modulation, pathogen survival, virulence, and disease progression. The course will cover topics such as host specificity, immune evasion, pathogenicity and host-pathogen coevolution. Examples from the current literature will illustrate the link between basic science research in infectious diseases and our understanding of broader biological phenomena, as well as mechanisms of pathogenesis.  See Learning Objectives

TRMD 7420 POPULATION BASED MALARIA PREVENTION AND CONTROL (3)
Professor: Joshua Yukich. Offered in Fall. Prerequisites: EPID 603. This course introduces the pinciples of prevention and control of malaria infection and diseases, as well as population based methods for evaluating the success of control programs or new interventions. This course investigates how culture, society, and the environment influence disease transmission, risk factors, and health status. Students will analyze data and integrate information using a monitoring and evaluation framework to inform prevention and control policy. Topics covered will include vector ecology, malaria epidemiology, malaria control strategies, malaria monitoring and evaluation, issues around cost-effectiveness, and prospects for elimination. See Learning Objectives

TRMD 7440 HOUSEHOLD SAMPLING APPLICATIONS IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES (3)
Professor: Thomas Eisele. Offered in Spring. Prerequisites: BIOS 603 and EPID 603, or approval from the instructor. The use of sample surveys to satisfy program-related information needs has become increasingly common in recent years in the international health, population and nutrition sectors. In order to take full advantage of recent developments in survey methodologies, professionals working in these sectors need to have a solid understanding of the intended uses and limitations of various standard protocols, as well as of the underlying principles of survey measurement. Accordingly, the purposes of this course are twofold: to establish a solid understanding of the basic principles of survey measurement and to review the state-of-the-art in survey measurement in global health, with primary attention to the methodological basis of the protocols considered, and the strengths and weaknesses of the various approaches in actual practice. See Learning Objectives

TRMD 7800 ADVANCED MEDICAL ENTOMOLOGY (2)
Professor: Dawn Wesson. Offered in Spring. Prerequisite: TRMD 606. This is an advanced level course that emphasizes relationships between arthropods and the pathogens they transmit. Lectures and weekly readings from the primary literature will focus on aspects of vector-pathogeninteractions and ideas at the forefront of research to better understand the ecology and epidemiology of pathogen transmission. Designed for biologists and health professionals who will be involved with U.S. and international agencies responsible for tropical medicine research and disease control. A $50.00 lab fee is assessed for this course.  See Learning Objectives

TRMD 7820 MALARIA (2)
Professor: Donald  Krogstad. Offered in Spring. This is an advanced course which provides a rigorous approach to the basic and applied issues related to malaria. Areas covered in detail include malaria epidemiology and control strategies, parasite-vector relationships, vector control, cell biology, and biochemistry of the parasite red cell interaction, drug action and resistance mechanisms, parasite genetics and cell biology, and the immunologic aspects of malaria, including asexual and sexual stage candidate vaccine antigens. At the conclusion of the semester, students are expected to critically review current strategies and suggest and defend appropriate alternatives.  See Learning Objectives

TRMD 7960 PREVENTIVE MEDICINE RESIDENCY (0)
Third year/practicum.

TRMD 7990 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-5)

TRMD 8100 LABORATORY ROTATION (2)
(Doctoral students only) The laboratory rotations will acquaint the student with the different research programs available in the department and assist the student in choosing a permanent dissertation advisor. In addition, by rotating through several laboratories the students will obtain laboratory experience and training in specialized areas. Ideally the laboratory rotations should begin during the first semester and continue through the summer until a permanent advisor is chosen in the second year.


 
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Department of Tropical Medicine, 1440 Canal Street, Suite 2301, New Orleans, LA 70112, 504-988-3558 tropmed@tulane.edu