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COVID-19 Off-Campus Healthy Living Guide

Be COVID Safe

This guide is intended to help students make healthy choices regarding living and visiting off-campus as it relates to the current COVID-19 situation. This will benefit students’ own health and well-being, as well as others in the Tulane and greater New Orleans community.

PREVENTING THE SPREAD OF COVID-19

Daily Self-Screening

testing

To help protect all members of our Tulane campus community, you should consider performing a daily self-screening prior to coming to campus.

Please ask yourself the following questions:
  • Do I have a cough?
  • Do I have a fever greater than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit?
  • Do I have chills? n Do I have an unusual, persistent headache?
  • Do I have shortness of breath or breathing difficulty?
  • Have I lost my sense of taste or smell?
  • Do I have any new respiratory problems (e.g., wheezing, congestion)?
  • Do I have abdominal discomfort?

If you can answer “yes” to any of the above questions, you should notify your professors and not come to campus.

Social Distancing & Wearing Masks

face mask

To prevent the spread, everyone should wear a cloth face covering in public, practice good hygiene and practice social distancing. Follow the guidelines issued by Tulane University and the City of New Orleans. You are expected to abide by which ever rule is stricter.

Use face coverings safely:
  • Wear cloth face coverings, such as one made with a bandana or scarf, or make your own using fabric.
  • Do not touch your face covering while wearing it.
  • Before putting it on and when you are ready to remove, wash your hands thoroughly before handling.
  • Wash face coverings after each use.
  • Store in a clean plastic bag.
  • Face coverings are a minimal level of protection. It is still imperative that you stay home except for essential needs and always avoid close contact with others.
Practice good hygiene:
  • Wash your hands with soap and water often for a full 20 seconds.
  • Use hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Limit essential activities if you feel sick.
  • Cover your cough with your elbow to prevent the spread of germs.
Practice social distancing:
hand washing icon

Follow social distancing guidelines by staying at least 6 feet (2 meters) from people who are not from your household.

 

  • Continue to stay home and limit your activities.
  • Limiting face-to-face contact with others is the best way to reduce the spread of COVID-19.
  • Social distancing, also called “physical distancing,” means keeping space between yourself and other people outside of your home.
  • To practice social or physical distancing stay at least 6 feet (about 2 arms’ length) from other people.
  • Avoid gathering in groups.
  • Send only one member of your household to do essential activities.
If someone in the household is sick:
  • Minimize contact between the sick person and others in the household.
  • Designate a separate bedroom and bathroom for the sick person if possible.
  • If a bathroom must be shared with other members of the household, clean and disinfect after each use by the sick person.
  • Avoid sharing personal household items (dishes, towels, bedding, etc.)
  • Designate a lined trash can for use by the sick person. Use gloves when removing garbage bags and wash hands immediately after.
  • Use gloves when handling non-disposable food service items used by the sick person.
  • Wash items with hot water or in a dishwasher.
  • Use gloves when handling a sick person’s laundry.
Cleaning & Disinfecting your Home

cleaning

The Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) offers the following guidelines for everyday steps to take to clean and disinfect your home as well as extra steps to take when someone is sick. Each household should have a home cleaning plan, assigning residents tasks for regularly cleaning and actively hold each other accountable for keeping up with those tasks. Please keep in mind that you should continue social distancing, using a mask when near others outside your home, and following guidelines issued by the City of New Orleans and Tulane University.

Routine cleaning and sanitizing of your home can help lower the chances you or a loved one will contract COVID-19 and lower the chance you might spread it to someone else. The CDC recommends taking steps to clean and sanitize high-touch surfaces in your home.

  • The CDC recommends you do a little of both, even if nobody in your home is sick.
  • Cleaning is about removing contaminants from surfaces.
  • Disinfecting is about killing pathogens.
  • Do both daily if anything or anyone has entered or exited your home.
Clean
  • Wear reusable or disposable gloves for routine cleaning and disinfection.
  • Clean surfaces using soap and water, then use disinfectant.
  • Cleaning with soap and water reduces the number of germs, dirt and impurities on the surface.
  • Disinfecting kills germs on surfaces.
  • Practice routine cleaning of frequently touched surfaces. High touch surfaces include: Tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, sinks, etc.
Disinfect

The EPA has a full list of disinfectants that will kill the novel coronavirus, but here are a few commons ones:

  • Disinfecting wipes (Clorox, Lysol, or store brand will do)
  • Disinfectant spray (Purell, Clorox, Lysol, all make sprays that will work)
  • Isopropyl alcohol
  • Hydrogen peroxide

Follow the instructions on the label to ensure safe and effective use of the product. Read the EPA’s guidelines for safe and effective disinfectant use.

Always read and follow the directions on the label to ensure safe and effective use.

  • Wear skin protection and consider eye protection for potential splash hazards
  • Ensure adequate ventilation
  • Use no more than the amount recommended on the label
  • Use water at room temperature for dilution (unless stated otherwise on the label)
  • Avoid mixing chemical products
  • Label diluted cleaning solutions
  • Store and use chemicals out of the reach of children and pets

You should never eat, drink, breathe or inject these products into your body or apply directly to your skin as they can cause serious harm. Do not wipe or bathe pets with these products or any other products that are not approved for animal use.

Diluted household bleach solutions may also be used if appropriate for the surface.

  • Check the label to see if your bleach is intended for disinfection and has a sodium hypochlorite concentration of 5%–6%. Ensure the product is not past its expiration date. Some bleaches, such as those designed for safe use on colored clothing or for whitening, may not be suitable for disinfection.
  • Unexpired household bleach will be effective against coronaviruses when properly diluted.
  • Follow manufacturer’s instructions for application and proper ventilation. Never mix household bleach with ammonia or any other cleanser. Leave solution on the surface for at least 1 minute.
Soft surfaces
  • For soft surfaces such as carpeted floor, rugs, and drapes.
  • Clean the surface using soap and water or with cleaners appropriate for use on these surfaces.
  • Launder items (if possible) according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Use the warmest appropriate water setting and dry items completely.

OR

  • Disinfect with an EPA-registered household disinfectant.
  • Vacuum as usual.
Electronics

For electronics, such as tablets, touch screens, keyboards, and remote controls:

  • Consider putting a wipeable cover on electronics.
  • Follow manufacturer’s instruction for cleaning and disinfecting. If no guidance, use alcohol-based wipes or sprays containing at least 70% alcohol. Dry surface thoroughly.
Laundry

For clothing, towels, linens and other items:

  • Launder items according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Use the warmest appropriate water setting and dry items completely.
  • Wear disposable gloves when handling dirty laundry from a person who is sick.
  • Dirty laundry from a person who is sick can be washed with other people’s items.
  • Do not shake dirty laundry.
  • Clean and disinfect clothes hampers according to guidance above for surfaces.
  • Remove gloves, and wash hands right away.
Clean hands often
hand washing icon

Wash your hands for 20 seconds or one Helluva Hullabaloo cheer.

 

Key times to clean hands:

  • Immediately after removing gloves and after contact with a person who is sick.
  • After blowing one’s nose, coughing, or sneezing
  • After using the restroom
  • Before eating or preparing food
  • After contact with animals or pets
  • Before and after providing routine care for another person who needs assistance (e.g. a child)

Wash your hands often with soap and water for 20 seconds.

  • Hand sanitizer: If soap and water are not readily available and hands are not visibly dirty, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. However, if hands are visibly dirty, always wash hands with soap and water.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
When Someone in your Home is Sick

illness

Contact Campus Health to Arrange a Visit and/or the Nurses Line!

Bedroom and Bathroom
  • Keep separate bedroom and bathroom for a person who is sick (if possible).
  • The person who is sick should stay separated from other people in the home (as much as possible).
  • If you have a separate bedroom and bathroom: Wear disposable gloves and only clean the area around the person who is sick when needed, such as when the area is soiled. This will help limit your contact with the person who is sick. Caregivers can provide personal cleaning supplies to the person who is sick (if appropriate). Supplies include tissues, paper towels, cleaners, and EPA-registered disinfectants. If they feel up to it, the person who is sick can clean their own space.
  • If shared bathroom: The person who is sick should clean and disinfect after each use. If this is not possible, the caregiver should wait as long as possible before cleaning and disinfecting.
  • See precautions for household members and caregivers for more information.
Food
  • Stay separated: The person who is sick should eat (or be fed) in their room if possible.
  • Wash dishes and utensils using disposable gloves and hot water: Handle any used dishes, cups/glasses, or silverware with gloves. Wash them with soap and hot water or in a dishwasher.
  • Clean hands after taking off gloves or handling used items.
Trash
  • Dedicated, lined trash can: If possible, dedicate a lined trash can for the person who is sick. Use disposable gloves when removing garbage bags, and handling and disposing of trash. Wash hands afterwards.
What to do if you are Ill

unwell

Students who believe they may have been exposed and have symptoms should self-isolate and immediately call the Student Health Center Nurse Advice Line at 504-862-8121 (during business hours) or 855-487- 0290 (after hours) or call TUPD at 504-8654-5911 for emergency medical services, as appropriate.

Protect Yourself When Using Transportation

As communities open, consider ways that you can protect yourself and slow the spread of COVID-19 when using transportation.

When using any type of transportation, follow these general principles:

Practice hand hygiene and respiratory etiquette.

  • Before you leave, wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Once you reach your destination, wash your hands again with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol as soon as possible upon arrival.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue or use the inside of your elbow. Throw used tissues in the trash and wash your hands immediately with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.

Practice social distancing.

social distancing

Follow social distancing guidelines by staying at least 6 feet (2 meters) from people who are not from your household.

 

Stay home when appropriate.

  • People who are sick or have recently had a close contact to a person with COVID-19 should not use public transportation and should stay home except to seek medical care.

Have adequate supplies.

  • Before traveling, pack sanitizing wipes and hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol (in case you are unable to wash your hands at your destination). Bring your cloth face covering to wear at times when physical distancing is difficult—for example, while riding on a train or bus, waiting at a rest stop, or riding in a car with people outside your household.

Protect people at risk for severe illness from COVID-19.

  • Individuals who are at higher risk of severe illness from COVID-19, such as older adults, people with disabilities, and people of any age who have serious underlying medical conditions, should limit their travel.
  • If you need special accommodations or assistance while traveling (for example, help with a wheelchair lift or with carrying bags), if possible, take a transportation “buddy” with you (preferably from your household) to help you during travel.
Public Transit
  • Follow the general principles listed above, plus the following:

Stay up to date.

  • Check with local transit authorities for the latest information on changes to services and procedures.

Avoid touching surfaces.

  • Limit touching frequently touched surfaces such as kiosks, digital interfaces such as touchscreens and fingerprint scanners, ticket machines, turnstiles, handrails, restroom surfaces, elevator buttons, and benches as much as possible. If you must touch these surfaces, as soon as you can, wash your hands for 20 seconds with soap and water or rub your hands with sanitizer containing 60% alcohol.
  • Use touchless payment and no-touch trash cans and doors when available. Exchange cash or credit cards by placing them in a receipt tray or on the counter rather than by hand, if possible.

Practice social distancing.

  • When possible, consider traveling during non-peak hours when there are likely to be fewer people.
  • Follow social distancing guidelines by staying at least 6 feet (2 meters) from people who are not from your household.
    For example:
    Avoid gathering in groups, and stay out of crowded spaces when possible, especially at transit stations and stops.
    Consider skipping a row of seats between yourself and other riders if possible.
    Look for social distancing instructions or physical guides offered by transit authorities (for example, floor decals or signs indicating where to stand or sit to remain at least 6 feet apart from others).
Rideshare, Taxi, Limo For-Hire Vehicle Passengers

Follow the general principles listed above, plus the following:

Avoid touching surfaces.

  • Avoid contact with surfaces frequently touched by passengers or drivers, such as the door frame and handles, windows, and other vehicle parts. In circumstances where such contact is unavoidable, use a hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol as soon as possible afterwards.
  • Avoid accepting offers of free water bottles and avoid touching magazines or other items that may be provided for free to passengers.
  • Use touchless payment when available.

Practice social distancing.

  • Limit the number of passengers in the vehicle to only those necessary.
  • Avoid pooled rides or rides where multiple passengers are picked up who are not in the same household.
  • Improve ventilation.
  • Ask the driver to improve the ventilation in the vehicle if possible — for example, by opening the windows or setting the air ventilation/air conditioning on non-recirculation mode.
Personal Vehicles

Follow the general principles listed above, plus the following:

Clean and disinfect surfaces.

  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces regularly (for example, the steering wheel, gear shift, door frame/handles, windows, radio/temperature dials, and seatbelt buckles).
  • When using parking meters and pay stations, consider using alcohol wipes to disinfect surfaces or use hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol after use. Wash hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds as soon as it is possible.

Practice social distancing.

  • Consider limiting the number of passengers in the vehicle to only those necessary.

Improve ventilation.

  • Improve the ventilation in the vehicle if possible (for example, open the windows or set the air ventilation/ air conditioning on non-recirculation mode).
Running Essential Errands

groceries

Grocery Shopping

Stay home if sick.

Order online or use curbside pickup.

  • Order food and other items online for home delivery or curbside pickup (if possible).
  • Only visit the grocery store, or other stores selling household essentials, in person when you absolutely need to. This will limit your potential exposure to others and the virus that causes COVID-19.

Protect yourself while shopping.

  • Stay at least 6 feet away from others while shopping and in lines.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face covering when you have to go out in public.
  • When you do have to visit in person, go during hours when fewer people will be there (for example, early morning or late night).
  • If you are at higher risk for severe illness, find out if the store has special hours for people at higher risk. If they do, try to shop during those hours. People at higher risk for severe illness include adults 65 or older and people of any age who have serious underlying medical conditions.
  • Disinfect the shopping cart, use disinfecting wipes if available.
  • Do not touch your eyes, nose, or mouth.
  • If possible, use touchless payment (pay without touching money, a card, or a keypad). If you must handle money, a card, or use a keypad, use hand sanitizer right after paying.

Use hand sanitizer.

  • After leaving the store, use hand sanitizer.

Wash hands at home.

hand washing icon

Wash your hands for 20 seconds or one Helluva Hullabaloo cheer.

 

  • Follow food safety guidelines: clean, separate, cook, chill. There is no evidence that food or food pack- aging play a significant role in spreading the virus in the United States.
Deliveries & Takeout

Limit in person contact if possible.

  • Pay online or on the phone when you order (if possible).
  • Accept deliveries without in-person contact whenever possible. Ask for deliveries to be left in a safe spot outside your house (such as your front porch or lobby), with no person-to-person interaction. Otherwise, stay at least 6 feet away from the delivery person.

Wash your hands or use hand sanitizer after accepting deliveries or collecting mail.

  • After receiving your delivery or bringing home your takeout food, wash your hands with soap and water for 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use a hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • After collecting mail from a post office or home mailbox, wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use a hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
Banking

Bank online whenever possible.

  • If you must visit the bank, use the drive-through ATM if one is available. Clean the ATM keyboard with a disinfecting wipe, if available, before you use it.
  • When you are done, use a hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds when you get home.
Getting Gas

Use disinfecting wipes on handles or buttons.

  • Use disinfecting wipes on handles and buttons before you touch them (if available).
  • After fueling, use a hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Wash your hands for at least 20 seconds when you get to your destination with soap and water.
Doctor Visits & Getting Medicines

Talk to your doctor online, by phone, or e-mail.

  • Use telemedicine, if available, or communicate with your doctor or nurse by phone or e-mail.
  • Talk to your doctor about rescheduling procedures that are not urgently needed.

If you must visit in-person, protect yourself and others:

  • If you think you have COVID-19, notify the doctor or healthcare provider before your visit and follow their instructions.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face covering when you have to go out in public.
  • Do not touch your eyes, nose, or mouth.
  • Stay at least 6 feet away from others while inside and in lines.
  • When paying, use touchless payment methods if possible. If you cannot use touchless payment, sanitize your hands after paying with card, cash, or check. Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds when you get home.

Limit in-person visits to the pharmacy.

  • Plan to order and pick up all your prescriptions at the same time.
  • If possible, call prescription orders in ahead of time. Use drive-thru windows, curbside services (wait in your car until the prescription is ready), mail-order, or other delivery services. Do the same for your pet’s medicine.
  • Check with your doctor and pharmacist to see if you can get a larger supply of your medicines so you do not have to visit the pharmacy as often.
Visiting Parks & Recreational Facilities

parks

Staying physically active is one of the best ways to keep your mind and body healthy. In many areas, people can visit parks, trails, and open spaces as a way to relieve stress, get some fresh air and vitamin D, stay active, and safely connect with others.

Don’t: Visit parks if you are sick or were recently exposed to COVID-19.

  • If you are sick with COVID-19, were recently exposed (within 14 days) to someone with COVID-19, or just don’t feel well, do not visit public areas including parks or recreational facilities.
  • Follow recommended steps to take if you are sick.

Do: Visit parks that are close to your home.

Avoid traveling long distances to visit a park because it may contribute to the spread of COVID-19 as:

  • Most travel requires you to stop along the way or be in close contact with others.
  • Travel may also expose you to surfaces contaminated with the virus that causes COVID-19.

Don’t: Visit crowded parks.

  • Do not visit parks where you cannot stay at least 6 feet away from others at all times.

Do: Prepare before you visit.

State or local parks

State and local authorities will decide whether parks and other recreational facilities will open. Check with the park in advance to be sure you know which areas or services are open, such as bathroom facilities and concessions, and bring what you need with you.

Beaches or other swimming areas

State and local authorities will decide whether natural bodies of water and beaches or swim areas will be open. Please check with individual beaches or swim areas for specific details.

Do: Stay 6 feet away from others and take other steps to prevent COVID-19.

If a park, beach, or recreational facility is open for public use, visiting is okay as long as you practice social distancing and everyday steps such as washing hands often and covering coughs and sneezes. Follow these actions when visiting a park, beach, or recreational facility:

  • Stay at least six feet from others at all times. This might make some open areas, trails, and paths better to use. Do not go into a crowded area.
  • Avoid gathering with others outside of your household.
  • Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom, before eating, and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
  • Bring hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol to use if soap and water are not available.

Don’t: Participate in organized activities or sports.

In general, most organized activities and sports such as basketball, baseball, soccer, and football that are held on park fields, open areas, and courts are not recommended. These activities and sports typically require coaches and athletes to be in close proximity, which increases their potential for exposure to COVID-19.

Do: Play it safe around and in swimming pools, and keep space between yourself and others.

There is no evidence that COVID-19 can be spread to humans through the water. Proper operation, maintenance, and disinfection (with chlorine or bromine) of pools should kill COVID-19. Swimming and other water-related activities are excellent ways to get the physical activity needed for a healthy life. If you are not sick or experiencing symptoms of COVID-19, it is safe to use swimming pools as long as steps are taken to reduce the spread of COVID-19:

  • Practice social distancing by staying at least six feet (two meters) from others.
  • Avoid large gatherings of more than 10 people.
  • Keep your hands clean by washing hands with soap and water, especially after going to the bathroom, before eating, and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing. Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol if soap and water are not available.
Coping Tools during High Stress Times

heart

How can we maintain emotional and mental well-being during high stress times? Consider the following recommendations and check out the resources below!

Be careful of COVID-19 overload. Limit the time you spend taking in COVID-19 news. It’s coming at us from all directions and this can be downright overwhelming. Turn off/stop reading the news. Maybe check in once a day.

Be careful of COVID-19 misinformation. Check out rumors for yourself by going to reputable sources. Check out state and local government sites for up to date information about closings. Go to the World Health Organization or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for correct information about the virus.

Our emotions reside in our bodies, so take good care of yours:

  • Maintain a regular sleep schedule—go to sleep and wake up at roughly the same time. Maintain a daily schedule, just like you would at school.
  • Work towards maintaining good nutrition and regular meals.
  • Limit alcohol and recreational drug intake.
  • Limit caffeine intake.
  • Get some exercise!
  • Spend some time outside, in nature, especially.
  • Practice deep breathing, relaxation, yoga, Qigong.
  • Try taking up an activity that requires use of your body and mind, which can give you an emotional break: knitting, art, playing an instrument, etc.

Social connection! Maintain social distance, of course, but stay in touch with friends.

Consider keeping a journal about what this experience is like for you. But be sure to end your daily entry with 3 good things about the day, however small, to help keep your spirits up.

Maintain perspective. While this is a HUGE event for all of us, remind yourself of what’s good in your life and what’s important: family, friends, working towards your degree, religion, spirituality, etc.

Spend time with your four-legged friends. Some snuggle time with your pets can make a tough day a lot easier.

Do something kind for someone else. If you can’t visit in person, call!

Check out these self-care tips from the Tulane School of Social Work and the Wellness Society’s free Coronavirus Anxiety Workbook.

Campus Resources & Helpful Websites

Tulane shield

Health Center for medical questions, needs and tests

Health Center Uptown
Office/Clinic Hours: Monday-Friday,* 8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m. (Closed on University Holidays)
Wednesday,* 9:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Closed daily, Noon-1:00 p.m.* (As of Apr. 1, 2020, until further notice)

Uptown (Main): Building 92 (Corner of Newcomb and Willow)
Phone: 504-865-5255 (Appointments, Nurse Advice, or General Info)
Referral Coordinator: 504-865-5255
Immunization Compliance: 504-865-5255
Medical Records: 504-865-5255, Fax: 504-865-5083
Patient Portal (Appointments, Immunization Compliance, Statements)

Health Center Downtown
*The Health Center Downtown is temporarily closed. The Health Center Uptown remains open for your use.
Office/Clinic Hours: Monday-Friday,* 8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m. (Closed on University Holidays)
Wednesday,* 9:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Closed daily, Noon-1:00 p.m.* (As of Aug. 8, 2018, until further notice)

Downtown: 127 Elk Place, Room 261 (adjacent to the Saratoga Garage)
Phone: 504-988-6929
Immunization Compliance: 504-988-3219

Case Management & Victim Support Services (CMVSS) can help you problem-solve, provide emotional support, arrange short-term accommodations, help you identify needed resources, or just be a shoulder to lean on! To connect with a Case Manager call (504) 314-2160, email srss@tulane.edu or submit a concern report.

Counseling Services provides comprehensive therapeutic services as well as connections to other health providers and counseling off-campus. Call (504) 314-2277 to access care.

The Line is a 24/7 crisis line for Tulane students. Call or text (504) 264-6074.

Student Affairs Professional On-Call provides a 24/7 professional staff on call for urgent situations and can be reached by calling

Helpful Websites

 

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