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Degree Requirements

Specific Requirements

degree

All students working toward graduate degrees must satisfy the general requirements as listed by the SSE.

Read below for specific requirements for the:


top ⇑Ph.D. Requirements

See a more detailed description of requirements »

  1. Complete at least 48 hours of coursework. Up to two courses may be taken in another department with the approval of the Graduate Studies Committee. For advanced incoming students, limited (up to 9 hours) transfer credit is possible.

  2. Pass the Placement Exam in linear algebra and advanced calculus. It will be taken at the beginning of the fall semester (the student’s first semester). If a student fails to achieve A- in the linear algebra portion, he or she will be required to enroll in Math 3090/6090. If the student fails to achieve A- in the advanced calculus portion, he or she will be required to enroll in Math 4060/6060. Read the Placement Exam syllabus for details and previous exams.

  3. Pass qualifying written exams in Analysis and two others chosen from among:


    Read exam syllabi for qualifying exams »

  4. Pass an oral exam on specific topics of research interest to the student.

  5. Write a dissertation.


top ⇑M.S. in Mathematics Requirements

This program is designed to provide students with the opportunity to broaden and deepen their knowledge of core areas of mathematics. The course work is designed to provide both breadth of knowledge and depth in an area of interest to the student. This experience will prepare the student for further studies leading to a Ph.D. degree in mathematics. Partial tuition waivers may be available to qualified students.


List of required courses


  • The sequence Math 7210-7220 Analysis I-II
  • Either the sequence Math 7010-7020 (Topology I-II) or the sequence Math 7110-7120 (Algebra I-II)
  • Math 7980 Reading and Research (3 credits - for those choosing the non-thesis option) consists of a semester-long project under the supervision of a faculty member from the Department

 

List of optional courses


  • Math 6030 Introduction to Stochastic Processes
  • Math 6210 Differential Geometry
  • Math 6300 Complex Analysis
  • Math 6410 Topology (except for those who have taken Math 7010
  • Math 7240 Mathematical Statistics
  • Math 7510-7520 Differential Geometry I-II
  • Math 7530-7540 Partial Differential Equations I, II
  • Math 7550 Probability
  • Math 7710-7790 Special Topics courses
  1. Non-thesis option:

    1. Ten courses (30 credits) at the 6000/7000 level.

      • All five courses from the required list plus five additional courses from the optional list.

      • Other courses not listed may be substituted with the approval of the Graduate Studies Committee. Up to six credits may be transferred from other departments or institutions with the approval of the Graduate Studies Committee.

    2. A four-hour written examination to be taken upon completion of the course work, with topics drawn from basic material in algebra, topology and analysis taught in the first-year graduate courses. The student is given two chances to pass this exam. One of the Ph.D. Qualifying examinations may be substituted for the Masters exam.

  2. Thesis option:

    1. Eight courses (24 credits) at the 6000/7000 level.

      • The first four courses from the required list plus four additional courses from the optional list.

      • Other courses not listed may be substituted with the approval of the Graduate Studies Committee. Up to six credits may be transferred from other departments or institutions with the approval of the Graduate Studies Committee.

    2. A thesis approved by the thesis committee consisting of a faculty member acting as advisor and two additional faculty. The thesis is typically much more substantial than the Math 798 project.


top ⇑M.S. in Applied Mathematics Requirements

This program is designed to provide students with the opportunity to broaden and deepen their knowledge of mathematics with an emphasis on those areas that have been most important in science and engineering. The student will also examine, through seminars and case studies, examples of significant applications of mathematics to other areas. This expanded base of knowledge, together with extensive experience in problem solving should prepare the student for further studies leading to the Ph.D. degree or for immediate employment in many areas of industry and government.

To enter the program the student should have a Bachelor's degree in mathematics, or a related field, and have completed undergraduate courses in Linear Algebra and Differential Equations. Students without these prerequisites may take them without credit toward the M.S. degree. Partial tuition waivers may be available to qualified students.


List of required courses


  • One Analysis Course (Math 6050/6060/7210)
  • One Statistics Course (Math 6020/6030/6040/7360 and 6370/7370)
  • Math 7310-7320 Applied Mathematics I-II
  • Math 7350 Scientific Computing I
  • Math 7980 Reading and Research (3 credits - for those choosing the non-thesis option)

List of optional courses


  • Math 6020 Mathematical Statistics
  • Math 6030 Stochastic Processes
  • Math 6040 Linear Models
  • Math 6050-6060 Real Analysis I-II
  • Math 6210 Differential Geometry
  • Math 6300 Complex Analysis
  • Math 7210-7220 Analysis I-II
  • Math 7530-7540 Partial Differential Equations I-II
  • Math 7570-7580 Scientific Computing II-III
  • Math 7730 Topics in Applied Mathematics
  • Math 7740 Topics in Scientific Computing
  • Math 7750 Topics in Partial Differential Equations

Math 798 consists of a semester-long project in differential equations, scientific computation, optimization, analytical methods, engineering or other topics in applied mathematics. The project must be under the supervision of a faculty member from the Mathematics Department.

  1. Non-thesis option:

    1. Ten courses (30 credits) at the 6000/7000 level.

      • All six courses from the required list plus four additional courses from the optional list.

      • Other courses not listed may be substituted with the approval of the Graduate Studies Committee. Up to six credits may be transferred from other departments or institutions with the approval of the Graduate Studies Committee.

    2. A four-hour written examination to be taken upon completion of the course work, with topics drawn from differential equations, and scientific computation. The student is given two chances to pass this exam. The Ph.D. Qualifying examination in Applied Mathematics or Scientific Computation can be substituted for the Masters exam.

    3. A programming project designed to demonstrate proficiency in one of MATLAB, Fortran, C, or C++.

  2. Thesis option:

    1. Eight courses (24 credits) at the 6000/7000 level.

      • The first five courses from the required list plus three additional courses from the optional list.

      • Other courses not listed may be substituted with the approval of the Graduate Studies Committee. Up to six credits may be transferred from other departments or institutions with the approval of the Graduate Studies Committee.

    2. A thesis approved by the thesis committee consisting of a faculty member acting as advisor and two additional faculty. The thesis is typically much more substantial than the Math 798 project.

    3. A programming project designed to demonstrate proficiency in one of MATLAB, Fortran, C, or C++.


top ⇑M.S. in Statistics Requirements


The Master of Science degree in Statistics combines theory and application. Our program emphasizes rigorous coursework in probability and mathematical statistics in addition to training in data analysis and computational methods.  Graduates from the M.S. program may either directly enter the workforce as junior level statisticians or continue their studies in pursuit of a more advanced degree.  Students with appropriate background (three semesters of Calculus and some knowledge of elementary statistics) usually complete the program in one or two academic years. Partial tuition waivers may be available to qualified students.

Course prerequisites include the equivalent of Math 6070 (Introduction to Probability), Math 6080 (Introduction to Statistical Inference) and Math 6090 (Linear Algebra). Enrollment in prerequisites does not provide credit towards the M.S. degree. 

Core Requirements


  • Math 7150  Intermediate Probability
  • Math 6020/7240 Mathematical Statistics
  • Math 6040/7260 Linear Models
  • Math 7980 Reading and Research

Math 7980 consists of a semester-long project completed under the supervision of a faculty member from the Mathematics Department, generally completed during the final semester of study.

Optional Courses


  • Math 6030/7030 Stochastic Processes
  • Math 6280 Information Theory
  • Math 6370/7370: Time Series Analysis
  • Math 7360 Data Analysis
  • Math 6350 Optimization Theory
  • Math 7550 Probability
  • Math 7570 Scientific Computation II
  • Math 7210 Analysis I
  • Math 7770 Topics in Statistics
  • Biostatistics/Bioinformatics courses at the 7000 level or above (with approval)

1.      Non-thesis option:

a.       Ten courses (30 credits) at the 6000/7000 level.

  • The four courses in the Core Requirements plus six additional courses from the optional list.

  • The student must have an advisor from the Probability and Statistics faculty.  Other courses not listed may be substituted with the approval of the student advisor and the Graduate Studies Committee.  Credits may be transferred from other departments or institutions with the approval of the student advisor and the Graduate Studies Committee.

b.  A four-hour written examination to be taken upon completion of the core  course work, with topics drawn from probability, linear models, and statistics. The student is given two chances to pass this exam. The Ph.D. Qualifying examination in Statistics can be substituted for the Masters exam.

2.      Thesis option: There is no thesis option for the M.S. in Statistics.

4 + 1 M.S. program in Statistics

This program enables students to obtain a B.S. in mathematics in 4 years, and in one additional year, to obtain an M.S. in statistics. Students may present up to four of the following core courses for both their B.S. in mathematics and their M.S. in statistics, provided they obrtain a grade of B or better in each.

At the discretion of the Statistics Coordinator and the Student's advisor, other similar courses may be subsituted for courses on this list. Students should normally apply in their third year at Tulane, should have a grade-point average of at least 3.0 in major courses, and obtain a positive recommendation from two Mathematics faculty. The GRE is not required.

Course Description

Math 6020

Mathematical Statistics

Math 6030/7030

Stochastic Processes

Math 6040

Linear Models

Math 6350

Optimization Theory

Math 6710 / 7210

Analysis I

Math 7360

Data Analysis

Math 7550

Probability

Math 7770

Topics in Probability and Statistics

Note: Any student planning to receive more than one M.S. degree must satisfy all requirements of each degree with no more than two cross-listed courses.

Please contact the Graduate Coordinator if you have additional questions:

Tai Ha
Phone: (504) 862-3429
Office: Gibson 408

Mathematics Department, 424 Gibson Hall, New Orleans, LA 70118 504-865-5727 math@math.tulane.edu