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Hypertension & Renal Center of Excellence
1430 Tulane Avenue
New Orleans, LA 70112
Phone: (504) 988-3703
Fax: (504) 988-2675

 

Mouse Phenotyping Core Facility

Mouse Phenotyping Core Facility

Contact Information
hr

Service:

  • 24-hour hemodynamic and activity monitoring by radio telemetry system.
  • Blood pressure determinations by plethysmography.
  • Single-mouse metabolic cages study.
  • Renal functional experiments (clearance experiments).
    • One station equipped with surgical instrumentation, surgical tables connected to temperature regulators and dissecting microscopes is available to perform clearance experiments. The station is connected to a Biopac system (Model 100, Biopac Systems, Inc; Goleta, CA) and a dedicated computer for data recording and analysis. The renal clearance experiments provide measurements of renal plasma flow, glomerular filtration rate, filtration fraction, urine flow, renal vascular resistance. Direct measurement of renal blood flow is obtained via a transonic ultrasonic flow-meter.
  • Renal nerve activity recording.
  • Echocardiography.
    • This service is based on a cardiovascular ultrasound system (Acuson Sequoia C512; Siemens, NY). The Acuson Sequoia 512 is among the most well-known and most popular ultrasound systems on the market today. Its popularity comes from its outstanding image quality and long-term history as a solid ultrasound machine. It provides functional cardiovascular physiology services to Tulane University’s investigators, and their academic partners throughout the New Orleans metropolitan area. With an experienced staff, it provides a focused and systematic approach to the study of the basal physiology and pathophysiology of the mouse cardiovascular system using 2D echocardiography. 2-D guided M-Mode & Doppler with 15 MHz Siemens Acuson Sequoia provides high resolution image analysis of chamber dimensions, wall thicknesses and ventricular function in lightly sedated mice or rats.

Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 504-865-5000 website@tulane.edu