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Adult Psychiatry Faculty

Ahmed, Muhammed, MD

Alvarez, Mary Beth, MD

Armeline, Aaron, PhD

Artecona, Jose, MD

Blue, Michael, MD

Bordenave, Jay, MD

Bradley, Janet, MD

Carr, Brent, MD

Crilly, John, PhD

DeLand, Sarah M.C., MD

Eckert, R. Christa, MD

Johnson, Janet, MD

Kelly, Clay, Jr., MD

Kinzie, Erik, MD

Mallik, Harminder, MD

Manguno-Mire, Gina, PhD

McConville, Brad, MD

Michalewicz, Leszek, MD

O'Neill, Patrick, MD

Peña, Jose M., MD

Pletsch, Gayle, MD

Potash, Mordecai, MD

Robinson, Dean, MD

Romero, Maryellen, PhD

Rouse, Jeffery, MD

Snow, Anita, MD

Soong, Herman, MD

Stanton, Erin, MD

Thompson, John W., MD

Tynes, L. Lee, MD, PhD

Vuotto, Angela, DO

Vyas, Sanket, MD

Weir, Ashley, LCSW-BACS, ACSW

Wilson, Mark, MD

Winstead, Daniel, MD

Brent Carr, MD

 

Current Positions:

Assistant Professor of Psychiatry — Division of Adult Psychiatry

Education and Training:

Psychiatry Residency— Tulane University School of Medicine; New Orleans, LA, 2000
Doctor of Medicine — Louisiana State University School of Medicine; New Orleans, LA, 1996
Graduate coursework — Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Tulane University, 2007- 2010
Bachelor of Science — Zoology and Physiology; Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, 1992

Certification:

Board Certified — American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN); Adult


Years at Tulane:

Faculty appointment:  July 2000.

Interests:

As with most of our faculty, I find joy in teaching and resident training.  I advocate for proficiency and skillfulness in establishing rapport and empathy— crucial elements for quality patient care.  From this, a reciprocal relationship between doctor and patient leads to harmony in the treatment process.  We see such balances in nature, and I tend to view the fundamentals of mental health and mental illness through an evolutionary psychological framework.  Comparative neuroscience is rich in examples of our connectivity with nature such that our very human traits may well be adaptations, byproducts, exaptations, and random variation fallen upon us through our phylogeny— that is, our ancestry. 

I have an appetent interest in Interventional Psychiatry and its effectiveness in helping those with refractory affective disorders, and I have prior served as director of an Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) department.   And, I have more recently become interested in the newer and increasingly promising treatments of neuromodulation such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS).  I enjoy my clinical practice with college/campus health, giving thoughtful reflection to the differential diagnosis for each patient, mastering the ever widening niche of psychopharmacology, treating anxiety and obsessional disorders, affective disturbances, and attentional problems, and the application of rigorous evidence based medicine.


 

Brent Carr, MD

Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 504-865-5000 website@tulane.edu