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SECTION OF CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRY

Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

 

PROGRAM HISTORY

The Department of Psychiatry and Neurology at Tulane was founded in 1948 when Robert Heath, was recruited from Columbia University as the first chair. The Child Psychiatry Program was founded in 1952 as the "Family Study Unit," under the direction of Irwin Marcus, a child psychoanalyst. Initially, the program offered a range of outpatient services and community consultation. In 1961, the American Medical Association accredited a two-year training program in child psychiatry, and an NIMH training grant was funded to support the program. The training program has been accredited every year since it was founded in 1961, and over 70 residents/fellows have trained in child psychiatry at Tulane.

The Morris Kirschman Clinic was founded in 1959 with support from Victor Kirschman and family in memory of his father. At the time of its opening, Victor Kirschman said, "My father decided that the time to tackle emotional problems was not when you were old, but when you were a child." This emphasis on early identification and intervention continues today at Tulane. The Morris Kirschman Clinic has been the outpatient clinic in child psychiatry at Tulane since its inception.

The section of child and adolescent psychiatry has been characterized by steady growth, a consistent commitment to private and community child psychiatry, and stability. The section has had only 5 directors since its founding in 1952.

 

PROGRAM PHILOSOPHY

The Section of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at Tulane represents a community of scholars and clinicians from a variety of disciplines who are committed to understanding the development, psychopathology, assessment and treatment of children at risk for or suffering from psychiatric disturbances from infancy through adolescence. This scholarly commitment is evident in the core activities of training and education, provision of clinical services, and conducting research. The faculty contributes actively to the scientific literature reflecting each of these core activities.The Section of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at Tulane represents a community of scholars and clinicians from a variety of disciplines who are committed to understanding the development, psychopathology, assessment and treatment of children at risk for or suffering from psychiatric disturbances from infancy through adolescence. This scholarly commitment is evident in the core activities of training and education, provision of clinical services, and conducting research. The faculty contributes actively to the scientific literature reflecting each of these core activities.

With regard to training, the Section strives to train clinician/scholars who are qualified and well prepared to work in academic, public sector, or private sector settings that require expertise in child and adolescent psychiatry. Central to the training program is an emphasis on understanding children and their development in context, including the neurobiological context, the internal psychological context, and various levels of the social and ethnic/cultural context. Critical thinking about children, their contexts, and the disorders that compromise them is an integral component of training. In addition, the multidisciplinary nature of children's mental health is underscored through joint training activities and cross discipline supervision.

Developing skill and comfort in communicating effectively with children and their families, including the ability to listen and observe behavior on multiple levels simultaneously, is an essential goal of training. In order to facilitate this goal, trainees are provided with numerous opportunities to observe faculty members conduct assessments and treatment of children and families. In addition, a tradition of the program is that faculty and trainees work collaboratively in various clinical settings throughout the two years of training to learn from one another.

Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 504-865-5000 website@tulane.edu