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T1 Electives

 

This page is maintained by the Office of Medical Education. You may contact the OME by email (omeweb@tulane.edu) or phone (504) 988-6600.

 

Interdisciplinary


Health and Human Rights-TRMD 6100

Dates and Course Information
Spring Semester (Period I only)/Elective Session 3
Wednesdays 12:30-2:30, Classroom JBJ 504


Course Instructors

Daniel Bausch, MD, MPH&TM

Associate Professor, Department of Tropical Medicine
Office: J. Bennett Johnston Building Rm 511
Phone (504) 988-6368;  Fax (504) 988-6686; Email dbausch@tulane.edu
Office hours by appointment

Anjali Niyogi, MD, MPH

Assistant Professor, General Internal Medicine and Geriatrics
Office: Tulane Medical School, Dept. of Internal Medicine
Phone (504) 988-7518;  Fax (504) 988-8252; Email aniyogi@tulane.edu
Office hours by appointment

Course Description
This course is designed to provide a forum for discussion of pertinent issues in global health and human rights and to motivate students to become active advocates for their resolution. Students will participate in weekly discussions with local and national experts in public health, clinical medicine, and health sciences research who are also strong advocates for human rights. The speakers will stress the importance of addressing the underlying social, political, and economic factors influencing health. Speakers will give examples from their background and the motivations for their career choices and discuss the skills and strategies necessary to become effective advocates for health and human rights.

Course Learning Objectives

  • Define and describe human rights and their relevance to biological health.
  • Identify and describe the diverse biological, social, political, and economic factors that influence health.
  • Describe the health professional’s role in addressing these diverse factors.
  • Describe practical organizing and advocacy skills and how to apply them to create positive change.

Reading Materials
Required text.  None. Readings will be distributed in class and posted on the blackboard (https://tulanestaging.blackboard.com/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp).

Reference materials/Suggested readings.

  • Perspectives on Health and Human Rights, by Gruskin et al (Eds). Taylor and Francis Group, 2005.
  • Infections and Inequalities: The Modern Plagues, by Paul Farmer. University of California Press, 2001
  • Pathologies of Power: Health, Human Rights, and the New War on the Poor, by Paul Farmer. University of California Press, 2003.
  • Strength in What Remains, by Tracy Kidder. Random House Publishing Group, 2009
  • Comrades in Health: U.S. Health Internationalist Abroad and at Home, by Anne-Emanuelle Birn and Theodore M. Brown (Eds). Rutgers University Press, 2013

Student Evaluation  

  • Oral presentation (35% of grade). The first 60 minutes of each class (after the first class) will consist of student presentations. Once per semester, each student will be required to give a 15-20 minute oral presentation on a topic of human rights interest of their choice and to propose advocacy steps for its betterment. If PowerPoint slides are used they should be limited to no more than 10 slides.
  • Written assignment (35% of grade). Each student will be required to compose a brief (<3 pages) research concept paper assessing a socially/politically relevant aspect of public health. 
  • Class attendance and participation (30% of grade). Students are expected to attend class regularly and participate constructively in the discussion. Students are allowed to miss a maximum of one class (with permission).

Policy and options for students who miss more than one class:
Students who miss more than one class have two choices:

  • Accept a one-letter grade diminution in final grade for each class missed over one. For example, if you missed a total of two classes and your grade would otherwise have been an A, it would now be down-graded to a B.
  • Make up the missed class (over one) by reading an article (excluding the introduction) from one of the two books below (both on reserve in the library) and submitting a one-page summary of the article by email to Drs. Bausch and Niyogi by midnight on March 14, 2014. A separate article and summary is required for each class (over one) missed. However, this method can be used only to make up for a maximum of two missed classes.
  1. Perspectives on Health and Human Rights, by Gruskin et al (Eds). Taylor and Francis Group, 2005.
  2. Infections and Inequalities: The Modern Plagues, by Paul Farmer. University of California Press, 2001

Students who have missed more than one class and have not submitted a write-up for option B by the deadline will be assumed to have selected option A.

Tentative Syllabus and Weekly Objectives:
Jan 14     Overview of Health, Human Rights and Social Justice
Daniel Bausch, Associate Professor, Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, LA; Founding Member and Board Member, Doctors for Global Health (http://www.dghonline.org/), Atlanta, GA

  • Define course contents and requirements
  • Identify and describe the interrelatedness of biological health with concepts of human rights and social justice
  • Identify and describe historical perspective on health advocacy movements
  • Introduction to efforts and accomplishments of existing healthcare advocacy groups

Jan 21     Research-Based Health Activism
Daniel Bausch, Associate Professor, Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, LA; Founding Member and Board Member, Doctors for Global Health (http://www.dghonline.org/), Atlanta, GA

  • Identify and describe practical approaches to developing and conducting research-based projects designed to engender health activism
  • Identify and describe how other health professionals have conducted research projects to effect policy or change in the health care system

Jan 28     Coalition Building and Grass Roots Advocacy
Glen Schneider, Chief Program Officer, The Horizon Foundation, Columbia, MD

  • Identify and describe the role of community organizing, coalition building, and voter education in public health advocacy
  • Identify and describe the interpersonal issues involved in working with communities
  • Identify and describe the components of a public health advocacy campaign, with an emphasis on issues specific to the NOLA community

Feb. 4     Public Health and Community Activism in NOLA
Barbara Major. Consultant and Specialist in Community Outreach, New Orleans, LA

  • Identify and describe public health and social issues unique to New Orleans
  • Identify and describe the strengths and weaknesses of public and private sector approaches to NOLA’s public health issues
  • Identify and describe some approaches to solving public health problems in NOLA

Feb 11    Liberation Medicine
Lanny Smith, Internist, HealthCare Associates, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA; Founder and Past President, Doctors for Global Health (http://dghonline.org/). See also www.socialmedicine.info

  • Define Liberation Medicine as a specific approach to activism in medicine
  • What is Social Medicine? Describe the history of the Liberation Medicine movement in the context of Social Medicine’s legacy and potential.

Feb 18    Human Rights and Refuge: The Role of the Health Provider in Asylum Cases
Anjali Niyogi, Assistant Professor, Tulane School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA; Volunteer, Physicians for Human Rights

  • Describe who qualifies for asylum
  • Describe the asylum process
  • Describe the role of the health provider in assessing asylum cases
  • Describe how individual asylum cases can inform and shape international policy

Feb 25    Homeless Medical Outreach
Jim Withers, Founder and Director, Operation Safety Net (http://www.pmhs.org/operation-safety-net/index.aspx), Pittsburgh, PA

  • Describe the history of Operation Safety Net
  • Identify and describe the elements of our society that result in homelessness
  • Identify methods to provide health services to homeless populations

Mar 4      Discussion of documentary film: Unnatural Causes: Is inequality making us sick? (http://www.unnaturalcauses.org/)
Anjali Niyogi, Assistant Professor, Tulane School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA; Volunteer, Physicians for Human Rights          


This course is offered as an elective for students in the School of Medicine and as a 1-credit course for students in the School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine.

Support for this course has been received by Public Citizen (http://www.citizen.org).

Note: Only option B is available for medical students taking this course exclusively as an elective through the medical school.

1430 Tulane Ave, New Orleans, LA 70112 504-988-5263 medsch@tulane.edu