shadow_tr
spacer
courses
spacer

NOTE:  The courses listed below include active and historically offered courses.  All courses may not be offered currently.  View current course offerings at Gibson Online.

For GHSD Learning Course Objectives, click here


ghsd iconGHSD 6010 COMPARATIVE HEALTH SYSTEMS

Instructor: V. Yeager

Offered: Spring

Health systems around the world are facing the dual challenge of ensuring continued improvement in population health in an environment of rapidly increasing demand with limited availability of societal and healthcare resources. Despite these common concerns, no two healthcare systems are identical. This course introduces an approach for comparative analysis with a focus on assessing performance of diverse health systems. Systematic comparative analysis employing quantitative information can identify concerns and policy options for the health sector in general. A set of common indicators for benchmarking among health systems will be discussed. The World Health Organization’s building block approach will be used to understand the inter-linkages among different components of the system and the effects of various reforms on system-wide outcomes. Students will examine and compare national health systems through various assignments and presentations.

ghsd iconGHSD 6030 INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH SYSTEMS, MANAGEMENT, AND POLICY (3)

Instructor: M. Demosthenidy; J. Steinberg; V. Yeager

Offered: All Semesters

This course provides a comprehensive survey of the U.S. health care system, health care policy, and management principles useful in the public health setting. Selected topics include: comparative health systems, the U.S. health care system (both public and private sectors), the legal and ethical bases for public health, the public policy-making process, and management principles of strategic planning, marketing, and project management, among others. Though this course focuses primarily on the American health care system, consistent with our global focus, it also examines several international health care systems, uses a variety of global examples, and teaches principles applicable to non-profit, non-governmental, and for-profit organizations .

ghsd iconGHSD 6050 HEALTH SYSTEMS CONCEPTS

Instructor: TBA

Offered: Fall

Health Systems Concepts is a graduate-level course that introduces you to the historical development, current structure and operation, and future direction of the U.S. health care system.  The course serves as a foundation for understanding the characteristics and complexity of a sector of our economy that currently makes up over 17% of our Gross Domestic Product.  The material in the course provides an overview of the ways in which health is produced and supplied through public health activity and health care delivery systems, the factors that determine the allocation of health care resources and the establishment of priorities, and the relationship of health care costs to measurable benefits.  The course content enables you to assess organized efforts to influence health delivery and policy formulation, the impact of these efforts on you as a manager and leader of your health care organization, and the role of societal values and individual behaviors on health system performance, reform efforts, and the health status of our population.

ghsd iconGHSD 6110 HEALTH ECONOMICS FOR DEVELOPING COUNTRIES (3)

Instructor: D. Hotchkiss

Offered: Spring

This course introduces the student to the basic economic concepts and analytical methods used to understand, analyze, and evaluate economic aspects of health systems problems with a focus on low- and middle-income countries.  The course applies tools of analysis to the behavior of households as well as to health care providers, health insurance organizations, and pharmaceutical industries.  The role of government in the production and delivery of health services, the economic aspects of health sector reform, and economic evaluation methods are also explored.

ghsd iconGHSD 6120 FOUNDATIONS OF MANAGEMENT

Instructor: D. Davis

Offered: Fall

The purpose of Foundations of Management is to give students a set of tools and insight into effective management concepts.  This course will provide students with best practices pulled from several industries which have been successfully applied in healthcare.  With the environment of health care being so diverse with a multi-generation workforce, students will need to become successful at motivating and coaching at all levels in the organization.  The expectation of this course is the students will be required to research key topics, perform key concepts in class, and be provided with immediate feedback.  The outcome is each person will have a set of tools to rely on when faced with various situations in the workforce, and will feel comfortable using the tools.

ghsd iconGHSD 6140 LEADERSHIP FOR CLINICAL IMPROVEMENT (3)

Instructor:  R. Boss

Offered: Summer

This course is open to all students who are seeking future opportunities in executive, managerial, public health, or other health care leadership roles. Students are introduced to the knowledge, skills, and personal mastery tools that are prerequisites to assuming leadership positions in the delivery of health services. Building on the perspective of clinical education and practice, the student begins his or her leadership journey with a focus on improving the health of both individuals and populations. The course uses a combination of didactic lectures, case-based learning and experiential exercises to explore leadership competencies including change management, strategy implementation, quality improvement, effective communication, team dynamics and systems thinking.

ghsd iconGHSD 6150 PUBLIC NUTRITION AND HEALTH IN COMPLEX EMERGENCIES (3)

Instructor:  N. Mock

Offered: Spring

This is a practical and skills based course that prepares public health/nutrition students to work in humanitarian settings. The course learning objectives include being able to assess the context of complex emergencies and humanitarianism; identifying the key elements of best practices in humanitarian response including infectious disease control, nutrition and food security interventions, environmental health interventions, shelter, psychosocial interventions and reproductive health services; defining and measuring key indicators of the magnitude of complex emergencies and measures of effectiveness of interventions; being able to conduct nutritional and health assessments and use state-of-the art information and communications technologies (ICT)/applications for assessment and monitoring purposes. The course methodology employs extensive use of field case studies, simulation exercises and actually measurement and analysis of anthropometric data using Epi-Info. No prerequisites are required. CDC IERH staff conducts several of the course sessions.

ghsd iconGHSD 6160 PUBLIC HEALTH IN CUBA (3)

Instructor: A. Castro

Offered: Summer

This two-week course addresses how the Cuban government has prioritized the development of universal health care, with a special emphasis on the efforts to strengthen primary health care and to articulate it with more complex levels of care. The course contextualizes and analyzes the programs to prevent infant mortality and to prevent and control infectious diseases such as polio, malaria, tuberculosis, dengue, and HIV, as well as the economic and political context in which these public health initiatives developed. The three-credit course takes place in collaboration with the National School of Public Health in Havana. Course activities take place in Havana and in rural areas.

ghsd iconGHSD 6170 QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN HEALTH CARE (3)

Instructor: A. Mora

Offered: Spring

MHA students only
This course introduces students of the Masters of Health Administration program to past and current strategies to define and assess the quality of health care delivery. Furthermore, the course offers tools required to examine, evaluate, and implement the key structures and processes of quality improvement programs in health care organizations. The course emphasizes practical applications that prepare the participants to use the theory and techniques of quality improvement in situations with complex clinical and managerial implications.

ghsd iconGHSD 6190 ETHICAL CONCERNS OF HEALTH CARE MANAGERS (2)

Instructor: M. Demosthenidy

Offered: Spring

Ethical Concerns of Health Care Managers This course introduces students to ethical problems within the context of health care, placing special emphasis on managerial dimensions of the discipline as well as bioethical applications. GHSD 6190 will introduce professional codes of ethics, examining their relationships to personal and professional integrity. Students will analyze ethical duties owed to patients and stakeholders, social responsibility, and disclosure, devoting specific attention to corporate culture and to compliance programs and their influence on ethical behavior in organizations. Students will also consider issues traditionally associated with bioethics and medical treatment decision-making.

ghsd iconGHSD 6210 HEALTH LAW AND REGULATION (3)

Instructor: M. Demosthenidy

Offered: Spring

This course is a graduate-level course that introduces a wide range of topics in the area of health law and regulation, including a number of relevant statutes. Students learn to recognize potential legal problems in various health care settings, identify the issues and rights that are implicated, and propose solutions or plans of action. They also learn to differentiate between legal problems and problems which can more appropriately be solved in other ways. There is an emphasis on formulating analyses clearly, both orally and in writing. The purpose of this course is to provide you with knowledge, tools, and opportunities to be able to: Explain the functions of and interaction between courts, legislatures, and regulators Analyze the role of the legal system in health policy and health care delivery Apply basic tort, contract, and corporate law principles; and Discuss the law’s limits in providing definitive answers.

ghsd iconGHSD 6240 HEALTH ISSUES O DEVELOPING SOCIETIES (3)

Instructor: M. VanLandingham

Offered: Fall

The course provides an overview of the major health problems facing resource-poor or “developing” societies; the divergent historical patterns of public health in rich versus poor societies; the links among public health, development, and culture; and strategies for improving public health in poor societies. There is no prerequisite for the course.

ghsd iconGHSD 6220 PROGRAM SKILLS IN CRISIS AND TRANSITION SETTINGS (3)

Instructor: N. Morrow

Offered: Spring

This course is designed to equip students with a set of skills related to the assessment and analysis of the social, economic, and policy aspects of complex political emergencies, as well as post-conflict/transitional settings. The course covers selected topics in preparedness, response, and transition in complex political emergencies, and their effects upon the civilian populations and the agencies that seek to assist them. Students develop skills in the following areas: information management, program operations management, and policy and context analysis. In terms of information management, students develop the capacity to adapt surveys to conflict-affected settings and utilize a series of rapid assessment approaches and participatory rural appraisal techniques for data collection. Students also learn to identify and utilize the principal components of crisis prevention and early warning information systems. In terms of program operations management, students develop skills in the construction of a logistics management system appropriate for emergency settings, and learn how to develop key programs of particular importance in post-conflict and transitional settings. In terms of policy and context analysis, students are equipped with analytical skills related to assessing potential harmful effects of humanitarian assistance, international political aspects of humanitarian work, international humanitarian law, and opportunities for promoting conflict resolution, capacity building, and development through humanitarian assistance.

ghsd iconGHSD 6250 DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF GLOBAL HEALTH INTERVENTIONS (3)

Instructor: N. Morrow

Offered: Spring

This course focuses on fundamental programming skills that can be applied to a variety of global health interventions focused on specific topics such as: disaster and emergency response, nutrition, child wellbeing, HIV/AIDS, infectious disease/malaria, reproductive health, etc… Students will acquire conceptual and practical tools to conduct situation analysis, conceptualize program/project frameworks, identify and manage human and financial resources required to successfully implement programs, and identify and develop necessary operational plans and procedures for Global Health interventions. Partnering and community-based approaches are the cornerstones of successful interventions. Therefore this course emphasizes participation, teamwork, and collaboration as essential programming skills.

ghsd iconGHSD 6270 MONITORING OF PROGRAM INTERVENTIONS IN GLOBAL HEALTH (2)

Instructor: J. Bertrand; M. Do

Offered: Fall & Spring

This course provides students with an introduction to program monitoring, a widely-valued set of skills for managing and tracking results in public health programs in both the domestic and international context.  Students will learn to develop a conceptual framework, write goals and measurable objectives, develop appropriate indicators (of input, process, output, and outcome), and work with health information systems.  Students will gain practical experience in translating concepts into applications for actual programs. This course is designed for students that (1) intend to work primarily in program design and implementation, or (2) wish to master these introductory concepts as a building block to further evaluation coursework.

ghsd iconGHSD 6280 EVALUATION OF PROGRAM INTERVENTIONS IN GLOBAL HEALTH (2)

Instructor: J. Keating; D. Meekers

Offered: Fall & Spring

This course provides students with basic concepts, principles, and practices for the evaluation of public health programs. This course focuses on the evaluation of important public health topics including malaria, HIV/AIDS, Tb, and Reproductive health programs. The course is intended to 1) provide an introduction to program evaluation, 2) provide basic professional skills for developing evaluation plans, and 3) provide a foundation for more specialized classes offered in the areas of data analysis, sampling, epidemiology, and operations research. 

ghsd iconGHSD 6320 MANAGERIAL COMMUNICATIONS (2)

Instructor: TBA

Offered: Fall

The purpose of this course is to develop the written and oral communication skills that students will need as leaders in healthcare-related organizations. To function effectively in complex professional environments, leaders must understand and use different communication behaviors and strategies to accomplish organizational objectives. This course will provide both the underlying concepts and the skill-building exercises to allow the student to develop, improve, and perfect their oral and written communications.

ghsd iconGHSD 6360 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2)

Instructor: W. Martin

Offered: Fall

This course is designed to develop and improve the written and oral communication skills that students will need as leaders in healthcare-related organizations. To function effectively in complex professional environments, leaders must understand and use different communication behaviors and strategies to accomplish organizational objectives. This course provides both the underlying concepts and the skill-building exercises to allow the student to develop, improve, and perfect their oral and written communications. Several written case studies and oral presentations based on case studies are required. The oral presentations will be videotaped and critiqued to evaluate student progress. Topics for developing written skills include reader-centered writing, pattern recognition skills, writing myths, and the stages of writing. Topics for developing oral presentation skills include eye contact, gestures, movement, stage fright, and using visual aids. In addition, the class will discuss the three facets of the communication process: words used, tone of voice, and non-verbals. The course will explain the impact of these three facets on the listener and outline the four basic communication styles professionals come into contact with every day. Methods for adjusting an individual speaking style to the style of others will be demonstrated.

ghsd iconGHSD 6370 GRANT WRITING FOR HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT PORJECTS (3)

Instructor: R. Hardy

Offered: Summer

This course is an intensive workshop-style class designed to teach students how to identify, research, and prepare grant proposals in the fields of international public health, population and nutrition, and development.  Specific emphasis is given to the idiosyncrasies of developing proposals for the United States Agency for International Development, the European Union, and the British Department for International Development.  By the end of the course students will know how to identify prospective funders, conduct pre-proposal research, and develop and write a full proposal, including writing clear and attainable goals and objectives, coherent methodologies, meaningful evaluations, devising budgets, and providing supplementary material.  The first week of the course combines lectures with in-class exercises, daily writing assignments, and an oral presentation.  The second week of the course is a required distance-learning component, during which the students are required to develop a full proposal and budget along with supplementary material to achieve the objectives of this course.

ghsd iconGHSD 6380 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR (2)

Instructor: L. Amoss

Offered: Fall

This offering provides theoretical and practical content for managers of health care organizations. The course allows students to learn organizational theory and then to apply it to organizational settings. Broad topical areas include psychological and cultural processes affecting recruitment and selection, factors influencing training and development, the scientific method as applied to health care organizations, theories and practices influencing employee performance, effective management theory and practice, engaging and involving employees in organizational processes, employee well-being, and managing change.

ghsd iconGHSD 6450 HEALTH ECONOMICS (3)

Instructor: C. Stoecker

Offered: Spring

This course introduces the student to the basic economic concepts and analytical methods used to address issues concerning the efficient and effective production of health and health services in a market economy, with an emphasis on the U.S. health system.  The course applies tools of analysis to the behavior of the consumer/patient as well as to physician, hospital, health insurance, pharmaceutical, and long term care organizations and industries.  The role of government in the production of health and the economic aspects of health reform are also explored.

ghsd iconGHSD 6490 POLICY OPTIONS ON MEDICAL PRODUCTS AND TECHNOLOGIES(3)

Instructor: L. Shi

Offered: Spring

The aim of the course is to give participants insight into and understanding of current developments affecting pharmaceutical policy making today. The course also aims to give participants a better understanding of the theories and methods available for analyzing the effects of policy interventions

ghsd iconGHSD 6500 INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH CARE ACCOUNTING (2)

Instructor: H. Long

Offered: Fall

This course is an introduction to the principles that have evolved governing how private-sector health care organizations report standardized financial information to parties external to the organization (though obviously also available to internal parties as well). The course will emphasize reporting of (a) organizational fiscal posture, (b) organizational activity and performance, and (c) basic interpretation and analysis of the fiscal information reported. The course assumes students have no prior study of or experience in accounting or finance.

ghsd iconGHSD 6540 MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING FOR HEALTH CARE MANAGERS (2)

Instructor: TBA

Offered: Spring

Prerequisites: GHSD 6500 OR ACCN 6010
This course covers the theory and applications of internal accounting.  Focus is placed on the analysis of costs behavior, and the use of that knowledge to plan and control for costs.

ghsd iconGHSD 6550 DYNAMICS OF PAYMENT SYSTEMS‒POLICY & FUNCTION (3)

Instructor: H. Long

Offered: Spring

Prerequisites:  ACCT 6010 or GHSD 6500 or equivalent.  Co-requisites: GHSD 6540 or ACCN 6020, and GHSD 6450 or FINE 6110, or prior coursework in Managerial Accounting and Introductory Micro-Economics. This course is designed to provide descriptions of how domestic providers of health care services have been, are, and will be paid for the services by private-sector payers and public-sector programs. Knowledge of economic concepts and of financial/managerial accounting will be used to analyze public policy issues as well as implementation and reporting issues. Topics include (1) basic private insurance mechanics and the income-tax implications of health insurance and health spending, (2) the macro-economic environment within which current payment systems have evolved and continue to evolve; (3) payment mechanisms for institutionally based care, both acute and sub-acute, and for ambulatory care over a range of settings; (4) regulatory processes used to determine payment for services in entitlement programs; (5) the policy objectives furthered or impeded by public-sector and private-sector payment mechanisms; and (6) analysis of provider responses to payment systems incentives.

ghsd iconGHSD 6710 QUANTITATIVE DECISION MODELS (3)

Instructor: J. Steinberg

Offered: Spring

Prerequisite: BIOS 6030.
This course encompasses a body of knowledge, a set of quantitative skills, and an orientation towards managerial situations which provide managers greater insight and analytic opportunities for improving the managerial process. Focuses on the systematic planning, direction, and control of the organizational processes that turn resources such as labor, equipment, and materials into services and the quantitative analysis that supports these decisions. In this environment, the processes involve allocation, scheduling, and procedural decisions that result in the effective and efficient utilization of resources for the delivery of health care services.

ghsd iconGHSD 6750 ADOLESCENT HEALTH POLICIES AND PROGRAMS (3)

Instructor: A. Gage

Offered: Fall

Prerequisites: BIOS 6030, BIOS 6040, or permission of instructor. This course provides students with an understanding of the context, design and effectiveness of the main interventions to prevent and reduce adolescent health risk-taking and develops students' professional skills in the use of quantitative methodologies to determine the health needs and problems of adolescents in developing countries and the formulation of workable strategies for responding to identified needs. The course begins with a discussion of major policy issues and controversies surrounding specific program approaches to reducing adolescent health risk-taking. Students will compare interventions for addressing common health problems in adolescence as well as services for meeting the needs of special youth populations in emerging and developed countries. The key components of successful and unsuccessful programs in specific health areas will be addressed.

ghsd iconGHSD 6760 HEALTH SYSTEMS STRENGTHENING: INTERNATIONAL FAMILY PLANNING (2)

Instructor: J. Bertrand

Offered: Spring

The concept of health systems strengthening is fundamental to the delivery of health services in the developing world. The WHO framework outlines six building blocks for health systems; governance, health financing, service delivery, human resources, commodities management, and health information systems. Through this course, students will master these concepts as they apply to the "re-emerging area" of international family planning. Whereas the concepts of health systems strengthening generalize to other health topics, the focus on family planning will allow students to gain in-depth knowledge and experience in using key tools relevant to this field. This course will be especially useful to students interested in managing social development programs in the international context, especially in the area of reproductive health.

ghsd iconGHSD 6780 INFORMATION SYSTEMS (2)

Instructor: M. Diana

Offered: Fall

Information technology and information systems are increasingly important to the management of health care organizations. This course is designed to introduce the health administration student to the rapidly evolving discipline of health informatics in the complex and diverse world of healthcare. The course will review the history, current applications, and the potential future of information, information management and information technology, including: data acquisition, storage and processing; information systems (clinical and administrative); standards; security; decision support; and an understanding of medical/health informatics methods and principles.

ghsd iconGHSD 6830 INTERNATIONAL HEALTH POLICY (3)

Instructor: D. Hotchkiss

Offered: Spring

This course examines the process of designing and implementing health policy with a focus on low- and middle-income countries. In addition to providing an overview of policies that have been introduced at the country level to improve health and health systems performance, the course also looks at the role international health partners, such as The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria and the United States Government’s PEPFAR program, are playing within national health policy frameworks. Constraints such as lack of resources, multiple stakeholders, weak accountability, and historical conditions are analyzed with both the practical and the ethical considerations of how the policy process operates in different cultures. This course helps students develop their own capacities to analyze, criticize, evaluate, and construct policy-oriented arguments.

ghsd iconGHSD 6850 POPULATION AND ENVIRONMENT THEORY (3)

Instructor: L. Murphy

Offered: Spring

This course surveys social science approaches (i.e., anthropology, economics, sociology) to understanding local to global population-environmental dynamics. The main approaches include: Malthusian theories, IPAT, Boserupian population-induced intensification, and systems thinking. It is also a broad survey of global environmental concerns and solutions. The course is oriented around themes and cases from environmental history (Mayan Civilization, Easter Island), local and global food systems, issues of urbanization and consumption, climate change, and integrated population, health and environment (IPHE). The course is recommended for graduate (and advanced undergraduate) students interested in working in developing areas on topics of population policy, reproductive health, development, poverty alleviation, and environmental issues.

ghsd icon GHSD 6890 HEALTH MARKET ANALYSIS- EPIDEMIOLOGICAL, SOCIAL, AND BEHAVIORAL CONSIDERATIONS (3)

Instructor: A. Solieau

Offered: Spring

An introduction to the concepts of market analysis, marketing, strategic planning, and research presentation management.  This course integrates students' knowledge of marketing, statistics and planning-and shares multiple research methods and healthcare databases. This course also incorporates students' grasp of the health care environment in the United States and its effects on the development, presentation and use of a strategic plan.

ghsd iconGHSD 6910 LEADERSHIP AND PROFESSIONALISM IN HEALTH CARE (2)

Instructor: M. Diana

Offered: Fall

MHA or MBA/MHA or JD/MHA students only. Leadership and Professionalism in Health Care is an introduction to the concepts of professional development and career planning. Students will identify career interests, learn job search strategies and networking, and understand the importance of lifelong learning to career success and advancement.

ghsd iconGHSD 6920 ADMINISTRATIVE INTERNSHIP II (1)

Instructor: M. Diana

Offered: Spring

MHA or MBA/MHA or JD/MHA students only. Prerequisite: GHSD 6910.The Administrative Residency
II is the fall MHA field experience designed to further expose the future health care manager to the operations environment.  The course is a continuation of the administrative practicum in a health care organization.  Following the summer residency course, this course consists of 14 weeks of part-time work during the fall semester.  The student will complete longer-term projects begun during the summer, or begin to assume new responsibilities.

ghsd iconGHSD 6980 HEALTH SYSTEM OF CHINA: AN APPLIED PERSPECTIVE (2)

Instructor: L. Shi

Offered: Summer

This course introduces students to various aspects (epidemiology, social, economical, cultural) of China's healthcare system. The course will be delivered in China so that the materials learned in the classroom can be observed in the real world through field visits and field observations. Health reform strategies of China in recent years will be critically examined through directed readings, seminar lectures, and a number of sites including primary care centers, tertiary hospitals, public health entities, and research organizations. Financing of health care and system for paying the providers will also be evaluated and analyzed.

ghsd iconGHSD 7020 COMMUNICATIONS RESEARCH FOR HIV/AIDS FAMILY PLANNING AND HEALTH (3)

Instructor: D. Meekers

Offered: Spring

Prerequisites: BIOS 6240 or a working knowledge of SPSS. This course constitutes a practical introduction to the research methodologies used in planning a communication program for promoting desirable health behaviors, designing appropriate messages, pre-testing communications and evaluating program effectiveness. Most examples and data sets will involve international family planning and sexual risk behaviors, but will be applicable to other areas of public health. Lectures will be combined with exercises in which students carry out communication pretests, conduct and analyze the results of focus groups and do secondary analysis of existing communication data sets using statistical software. These skills are basic to the systematic approach in designing, implementing, and evaluating a health communication program.

ghsd icon GHSD 7070 THE SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF HIV/AIDS (3)

Instructor: K. Andrinopoulos

Offered: Spring

HIV/AIDS is an important public health problem. Developing an appropriate response to the epidemic requires an understanding of factors at multiple levels that influence vulnerability and behavior. Patterns of infection also serve as a vehicle for understanding social disparities. The goal of this course is to provide students with the skills to critically reflect on current strategies to stem the epidemic through a sociological approach to understanding epidemiological patterns. We will analyze structural and social factors (for example, poverty, racism, stigma) and processes (migration, incarceration, social exchange) that influence vulnerability to infection, and successful provision of testing, treatment, and care. Our exploration is centered on “praxis” meaning that we aim to translate our exploration of these constructs and processes into meaningful action to mitigate the epidemic. Students will participate in group work and individual assignments that apply concepts discussed in class. Through these activities they will be challenged to create solutions that address elements of the structural and social environment. The course format combines lectures and presentations, seminars, and small group activities to highlight the complexities of the epidemic and equip students with the skills, resources, and agency to become active participants in the global response.

ghsd iconGHSD 7120 MONITORING AND EVALUATING MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH PROGRAMS IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES (3)

Instructor: A. Gage

Offered: Fall

This course is designed to serve the purpose of (1) providing students with an understanding of the context and design of the main interventions to improve maternal and child health in developing countries, (2) developing professional skills in the use of quantitative analytical tools and technologies to appropriately monitor and evaluate maternal and child health programs in developing countries, and (3) increasing students; abilities to use monitoring and evaluation results to improve the planning and delivery of maternal and child health services in developing countries.

ghsd iconGHSD 7140 MONITORING AND EVALUATION OF HIV/AIDS PROGRAMS (3)

Instructor: A. Gage

Offered: Fall

Prerequisites:  BIOS 6030 and GHSD 6270
This course focuses on the monitoring and evaluation of HIV/AIDS programs.  The course is intended to (1) provide an introduction to HIV/AIDS prevention, care, and treatment programs; (2) strengthen skills in the application of tools for global and national level monitoring of the HIV epidemic and response; (3) provide a foundation for monitoring and evaluating specific HIV/AIDS programmatic areas (prevention, testing and counseling, treatment, community and home-based care, tuberculosis/HIV integration, orphans and vulnerable children, most-at-risk populations, and behavior change communication); and (4) demonstrate how M&E findings are used to prioritize options for improving the national HIV/AIDS response.

ghsd iconGHSD 7170  STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT OF HEALTHCARE ORGANIZATIONS (3)

Instructor: T. Stranova

Offered: Spring

This course builds upon numerous courses to further develop the concepts of strategic thinking, strategic planning, and strategic management; all of which are vital to successful health care organizations. The course integrates knowledge of management, marketing, organizational behavior, human resources, finance, accounting, health policy, and economics. The course also incorporates students’ understanding of the health care environment in the United States and its effects on the development of a strategic plan. This integration is accomplished through the completion of an actual strategic assessment and project for a health care delivery organization.

ghsd iconGHSD 7200 DEVELOPING ISSUES: THEORY AND MEASUREMENT (3)

Instructor: L. Murphy

Offered: Fall

Prerequisite: No formal prerequisite. This course critically reviews major theories, concepts and debates about social, human and economic development in the developing world economic growth, modernization, dependency, neoliberalism, sustainable development, human development, and human rights approaches, capabilities Approach, and Post-Development thought. These challenge notions of poverty, participation, gender, culture, technology, globalization, sustainability, foreign aid, and development institutions. Insights from critical research on development agencies and projects show how worldviews and assumptions translate into "development" projects with unintended outcomes. The course will be helpful for the reflective public health and international development student who wants a broad, interdisciplinary, critical overview of current trends in development theory and its implications for practice.

ghsd iconGHSD 7210 SURVEY DATA ANALYSIS IN FAMILY PLANNING AND REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH RESEARCH(3)

Instructor: M. Do

Offered: Spring

Prerequisite: BIOS 6030 Introductory Biostatistics, EPI 6030 Epidemiological Methods I, GHSD 6270 and 6280 Monitoring and Evaluation of Program Interventions in Global Health (can be taken concurrently); no previous experience with Stata is required. This course is intended for advanced Masters students and doctoral students. The course will introduce students to a number of key concepts and measures used in the monitoring and evaluation of family planning and reproductive health programs. Students will gain an understanding of a variety of reproductive health and health service indicators, data sources and their strengths and limitations. This course also provides basic hands-on quantitative skills that are essential in conducting monitoring and evaluation exercises in family planning and reproductive health programs. Students will learn how to use the Stata statistical software package to manage and analyze survey data and to construct reproductive health indicators. Students will also learn to interpret and present quantitative data, using graphs and tables, in ways that are suitable for scientific manuscripts.

ghsd iconGHSD 7330 NEGOTIATION ANALYSIS (2)

Instructor: T. Keogh

Offered: Spring

Negotiating skills are used in all aspects of life. From interpersonal to business situations, all of us use negotiations in one way or another. Some of the fundamentals of effective negotiating are intuitive, and some stretch our preferred methods of getting what we want. This course combines discussion of the fundamentals of negotiation with classroom practice using healthcare case studies. The purpose of this course is to build skills in the fundamentals of negotiating in a healthcare setting. Emphasis will be on designing an effective approach to a negotiation, practicing individual negotiating skills, and understanding the process of a successful negotiation. Students will be required to negotiate two one-on-one case situations with a class colleague in front of the Class. These negotiations will be recorded. In addition there will be group negotiations and other practice negotiations.

ghsd iconGHSD 7350 THEMES IN MORTALITY AND HEALTH (3)

Instructor: P. Anglewicz

Offered: Fall

Prerequisite: GHSD 6800
Is there a limit to human life expectancy?  Why do some populations have greater longevity and less premature death than others?  How will trends on obesity affect life expectancy in the U.S.?  Is economic development necessary to achieve better population health?  What programs and policies have achieved the greatest effect in reducing premature mortality?  These and other questions will be discussed in this course, which covers the core thematic areas of mortality research.  Readings include overviews of trends and variation in mortality and health,as well as papers that represent exceptionally important, interesting, or clever approaches to the study of mortality. Particular attention will be paid to (1) variation in mortality levels over time, across populations, and within countries - with a particular focus on variations in mortality within the U.S., (2) reasons for changes in mortality levels in developed and developing countries, and (2) policies that best address problems in population health.

ghsd iconGHSD 7420 MALARIA PREVENTION AND CONTROL (3)

Instructor: J. Keating & T. Eisele

Offered: Fall

Prerequisite: EPID 6030
This seminar-style course is designed to provide students with basic biological, epidemiological, entomological, and social science concepts, paradigms, and policies underlying the collection and use of population-based data for the prevention and control of malaria infection and disease. The course will build on this foundation to introduce the principles of prevention and control of malaria infection and disease, as well as population based methods for evaluating the success of control programs or new interventions. This course investigates how culture, society, and the environment influence disease transmission, risk factors, and health status. The course is trans-disciplinary and is intended to 1) emphasize connections between the biologic nature of malaria parasites and the social, economic, and political context in which malaria policy is developed; 2) provide an overview of how science is translated into policy, using examples from countries in sub-Saharan Africa; and 3) provide a foundation for using population based data for the prevention and control of malaria in Africa.Topics covered will include vector ecology, malaria epidemiology, malaria control strategies, malaria monitoring and evaluation, issues around cost-effectiveness, and prospects for elimination.

ghsd iconGHSD 7440 HOUSEHOLD SAMPLING APPLICATIONS IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

Instructor: T. Eisele

Offered: Spring

Prerequisites: BIOS 6030 and EPID 6030, or approval from the instructor.  The use of sample surveys to satisfy program-related information needs has become increasingly common in recent years in the international health, population and nutrition sectors. In order to take full advantage of recent developments in survey methodologies, professionals working in these sectors need to have a solid understanding of the intended uses and limitations of various standard protocols, as well as of the underlying principles of survey measurement. Accordingly, the purposes of this course are twofold: to establish a solid understanding of the basic principles of survey measurement, and to review the state-of-the-art in survey measurement in global health, with primary attention to the methodological basis of the protocols considered, and the strengths and weaknesses of the various approaches in actual practice.

ghsd iconGHSD 7580 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (3)

Instructor: H. Long

Offered: Spring

Prerequisites:  GHSD 6500 or ACCN 6010, GHSD 6502 OR ACCN 6020, and GHSD 6450 or FINE 6110.
This course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts and principles of managerial finance, the application of the principles of microeconomics to resource allocation decisions at the level of the firm (provider organization). Emphasis is on the relevance of basic notions of finance in both for-profit and non-profit private-sector health care settings. The course surveys techniques focused at the provider level of economic valuation, alternative valuation concepts and choosing among them, required rates of return, the cost of capital, identification of relevant cash flows, simple resource allocation addressing asset acquisition and divestment, concepts of risk measurement, capital structure management, and an overview of acquiring and servicing capital.

ghsd iconGHSD 7660 HEALTH POLICY ANALYSIS (3)

Instructor: M. Demosthenidy

Offered: Fall

Prerequisites: GHSD 6030 or GHSD 6050; can be taken concurrently. This course presents an overview of health policy in the United States – its scope, its dynamics, and its conceptual and practical dilemmas – to students relatively new to the study of policy. The course is designed to acquaint students with major issues in the policymaking process, specifically in formulating, implementing and assessing those patterns of decision established by government. Students will explore the history and structure of the American health care system, as well as the challenges related access, cost, and quality. The course will particularly explore the history of health care reform in the U.S., taking a detailed look at the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

ghsd iconGHSD 7680 MANAGED CARE CONCEPTS IN POPULATION MANAGEMENT (1)

Instructor: M. Heywood

Offered: Fall

Managed Care Organizations (MCOs) utilize segmentation and benchmarking techniques to efficiently manage covered populations. This course will provide an overview of the purpose of population management and methodologies used to trend cost of care and analyze premium sufficiency. Topics will include (1) current regulations creating downward pressure on MCO's financial performance; (2) sociological drivers on care utilization; (3) an introduction to interpreting lag analysis and other trended data, and (4) a discussion on MCO’s response to adverse experience. Course format will include lectures, class discussions, and student presentations. The purpose of this course is to provide meaningful exposure and knowledge of MCO’s methodology to effectively manage covered populations for improved outcomes and financial viability.

ghsd iconGHSD 7690 PHYSICIAN PRACTICE MANAGEMENT (1)

Instructor: A. Trahan

Offered: Fall

This course introduces students to the fundamental tenets of physician practice management. Through lecture and group activity, students will analyze the principles for both establishing and effectively managing a medical group practice. This course will review the history, current challenges, and future landscape of physician practice management in the U.S., with an emphasis on care delivery in a data driven environment. This course aims to provide students with an understanding of the theories behind successful medical practice management, as well as tactical tools for successful practice operations and physician alignment.

ghsd icon GHSD 7800 INTRODUCTION TO POPULATION STUDIES (3)

Instructor: M. VanLandingham

Offered: Fall

This course introduces students to key concepts and measures; major theoretical perspectives and central debates; empirical material on population size, distribution, and trends; and basic methodological tools used in the field of demography, the study of population processes. There is no prerequisite for the course, but much of the material is quantitative in nature and so students considering taking the course should be comfortable performing computations and comfortable with basic algebra. Familiarity with a spreadsheet package such as Excel will be helpful for completing the homework problem set assignments.

ghsd iconGHSD 7910 ADMINISTRATIVE RESIDENCY I (1)

Instructor: M. Diana

Offered: Fall

MHA, MBA/MHA, and JD/MHA students only. Prerequisite: GHSD 6910 and GHSD 6920.This is a summer residency course consisting of 14 weeks of full-time work and starts in mid-May immediately following the end of the spring semester. During this summer experience, each student is expected to be intensely involved in the daily operation of the organization and, when appropriate, receive exposure to organizational governance.

ghsd iconGHSD 7920 ADMINISTRATIVE RESIDENCY II (1)

Instructor: M. Diana

Offered: Spring

MHA, MBA/MHA and JD/MHA students only. Prerequisite: GHSD 6910, GHSD 6920, and GHSD 7910.
The Administrative Residency II is the fall MHA field experience designed to further expose the future health care manager to the operations environment.  The course is a continuation of the administrative practicum in a health care organization.  Following the summer residency course, this courses consists of 14 weeks of part-time work during the fall semester.  The student will complete longer-term projects begun during the summer, or begin to assume new responsibilities.

ghsd iconGHSD 7950 RESEARCH APPROACHES AND DESIGN FOR GLOBAL HEALTH (3)

Instructor: P. Anglewicz

Offered: Fall

Prerequisite: Doctoral student in good standing and permission of instructor.
Many of the class sessions are about epistemological issues in research.  How do we know what we think we know? How can we answer research questions with data that best reflect "objective truths?"  Starting with these epistemological questions, and transitioning to research design, this course presents research as a systematic method for examining questions derived from related theory and practice, and links questions and theoretical standpoints to different sources of data and analytical approaches.  Students will be exposed to major research designs for interdisciplinary research, ranging from experimental designs to quasi-experimental studies using cross-sectional surveys and secondary data analysis of large-scale data sets, to non-experimental approaches such as ethnographic methods, group discussions, and case-study designs.  The range of research designs discussed provides a basic understanding of approaches that are relevant and widely used in interdisciplinary global health and health services research.  Attention will be paid to issues of sampling strategies for quantitative and qualitative inquiry; appropriate methods and techniques of analysis for different research designs, levels and unit of analysis, measurement issues, and how they are handled, and logic, validity, and reliability of designs.  This course is also designed to provide guidance on various steps of the research process, including research ethics, and organizing and writing a research paper.

ghsd iconGHSD 7960 APPLIED INTERDISCIPLINARY THEORY FOR GLOBAL HEALTH RESEARCH

Instructor: K. Andrinopoulos

Offered: Spring

Through readings and discussion of theory, students explore the nature of health, human behavior and social and behavioral change.  This exploration is intended to assist students in the process of developing their doctoral dissertation proposal, with emphasis on the theoretical basis and conceptual model for their chosen area of investigation.  The course will take a critical and multidisciplinary perspective to the task of integrating and applying interdisciplinary theoretical frameworks to address research questions. The course will emphasize how theories, worldviews and assumptions are used to develop and support research projects that will guide: 1) empirical research approaches (quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods approaches) and 2) the design and assessment of public health programs, policies, and other interventions. This course critically reviews several major theoretical frameworks applied to global health such as the determinants of health outcomes, the structure and performance of health related organizations, and the causes of health–seeking behaviors. GHSD 8020 is a required course for doctoral students in this department.  Good academic standing and permission of the instructors are prerequisites for this doctoral level course.

ghsd iconGHSD 7990 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-12)

Permission of coordinator is required.

ghsd iconGHSD 8050 DOCTORAL SEMINAR (1)

Offered: Fall & Spring

Students in this course will select individual papers published from peer-reviewed journals on topics of interest to them, and lead a summary, critique, and group discussion of the research methodology and general science underlying the article; develop critical thinking skills related to issues of research design, methodology, implementation, presentation, and discussion of results; develop critical and presentation skills through guided mentoring and close and structured interaction with their peers and the faculty.

ghsd iconGHSD 8250 ADVANCED RESEARCH METHODS IN GLOBAL HEALTH (3)

Instructor: P. Hutchinson

Offered: Spring

Prerequisites: BIOS 6040, BIOS 6040, EPID 6030 or permission of the instructor.
This course is intended for doctoral students preparing for their comprehensive exams and working towards their dissertations. The focus is on providing quantitative skills for conducting program, impact or other forms of evaluation using econometric methods, particularly for use with observational data and non-experimental or quasi-experimental using the Stata 12.0 (or 13.0) statistical software package. Key topics that will be covered are: Linear regression models with their assumptions and limitations; Limited dependent variable models (logit, probit tobit, multinomial logit/probit); Structural Models; Instrumental variables and two-stage least squares to correct for endogeneity; Sample selection models; Multilevel models and models with complex sample designs; Matching methods: Propensity score matching, exact matching, nearest neighbor matching; Applications of program evaluations; Time series analysis with pooled and longitudinal data; Regression discontinuity designs.

ghsd iconGHSD 8350

Instructor: C. Stoecker

Offered: Fall

This course is intended for doctoral students interested in policy analysis. It will focus on when to apply the various econometric methods to panel data. Discussion will focus on how each technique is applied in practice. Techniques will include differences-in-differences, synthetic controls, regression discontinuity, and quantile regression.

ghsd iconGHSD 9970 DISSERTATION (0)


ghsd iconGHSD 9990 DISSERTATION RESEARCH (2)

 

spacer

1440 Canal Street | Suite 1900 | Box TB-46 | New Orleans, LA 70112 | 504-988-5428 | ghsd@tulane.edu