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View current course offerings at the Office of the Registrar


Environmental Health Sciences Courses:

GEHS 6030 SURVEY OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH (3)   
This course is designed as a survey course which introduces students to basic environmental health factors that impact human health and the environment. These factors include health hazards associated with contaminated water, food and air, vectors of disease, exposure to toxic chemicals, environmental justice, regulations, and safety in the work place .Impact of globalization, climate change, deforestation, and general environmental degradation affecting our health and the environment are also discussed. See Course Learning Objectives

GEHS 6110 GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE ISSUES IN PUBLIC HEALTH POLICY & GOVERNMENT (3)
The objective of the course is to provide students with a thorough understanding of global climate change phenomenon, the public health issues associated with it, and the role of policy and governance in tackling this problem. In line with this objective, the course examines the scientific, political and socio economic factors influencing public health policy development, adaptation and compliance in response to the global climate change problem. The course also analyzes the current policy and governance interventions, and sheds light on framing future policy and governance mechanisms as the science of global climate change and its effects continues to evolve. See Course Learning Objectives

GEHS 6420 FOOD SAFETY & PUBLIC HEALTH (3)
This course is designed for students who are interested in local, national and international food safety. Food resources, production, biological, chemical and radiological contaminants are discussed. The focus will be on adverse health effects resulting from exposure to contaminated food. Sanitary regulations /codes addressing food safety including inspection of food establishments, investigation of food borne illnesses especially following disasters and genetically modified foods will also be discussed. See Course Learning Objectives

GEHS 6430 DISASTER AND EMERGENCY COMMUNICATION (3)
GEHS 6430 is a fast-paced, interactive course that focuses on the essential knowledge and tools needed to navigate the harsh realities of communicating to the public, media, and stakeholders during an intense public emergency, including terrorism. The course content will meet the crisis communication training needs of distinct groups (e.g., public health professionals, medical and health professionals, emergency response officials, community and civic leaders, the private business sector and volunteer organizations) at the community, regional and national levels. See Course Learning Objectives

GEHS 6500 TOXIC & HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT (3)
Toxic and Hazardous Waste management explores the public health implications of the storage, handling, disposal, permitting, and generation of hazardous waste. The legacy of waste generation is also discussed, including contaminated land management and assessment (Environmental Site Assessments Phase I and II, Louisiana Risk Evaluation/Corrective Action Plan). See Course Learning Objectives

GEHS 6510 WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT (3)
Water Quality Management explores the link between water quality and public health. Topics cover the foundations of surface water quality, groundwater quality, and stormwater quality. The principals of potable water and wastewater treatment permitting and treatment are discussed as well as the scientific causes, consequences, and solutions of pollution in lakes, rivers, wetlands, and groundwater; analysis of the physical, chemical, and biological indicators of water quality. See Course Learning Objectives

GEHS 6550 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH MANAGEMENT (3)
This course examines the fundamentals of environmental public health and the relevance of sustainable management of natural resources to public health. It explores the science of natural and built environmental stressors and their impacts on human health, and examines a number of model environmental health and natural resources management best practices from policy and management perspectives. Students learn to develop and apply appropriate natural resources management plans, environmental health plans, and environmental management systems to a number of problem scenarios including disaster scenarios. Topics include key environmental media – air, water, and food. Others are forest, wetlands, soil and agricultural land management; interventions for environmental toxins and vectors of diseases; and studies in global climate change impacts on environmental public health. Students are given case-study based assignments to aid their skill development in applied environmental health management. Open to graduate and undergraduate students. No pre-requisite course is necessary. See Course Learning Objectives                                                                                                            

GEHS 6600 PRINCIPLES OF TOXICOLOGY (3)
This course focuses on the fundamentals of toxicology and the mechanisms by which environmental and occupational chemical agents affect human health. The principles and mechanisms will be approached in three areas: 1) General principles: route of exposure; dose response; absorption, distribution, storage, metabolism and excretion; 2) Effects on target organs: liver, kidney, blood, respiratory system and nervous system; and 3) Application of the principles of toxicology using: solvents, pesticides and metals. At the end of this course, the student will be able to apply the principles of toxicology for compounds found in the environment and workplace. See Course Learning Objectives

GEHS 6610 TOXICOLOGY OF ENVIRONMENTAL AGENTS (3)
The classes of toxicants and their actions are studied in detail in Toxicology of Environmental Agents. Mechanisms and targets of the general classes of toxicants are emphasized. Students are expected to demonstrate ability to use and interpret the current toxicological literature in this course. See Course Learning Objectives

GEHS 6620 PHYSICAL AGENTS & ERGONOMIC HAZARDS IN THE WORKPLACE (3)
Occupational exposure to temperature extremes, abnormal pressure, noise, mechanical vibration, non-ionizing radiation, and cumulative trauma/ergonomics are discussed in lecture sessions. The fundamental physics, health effects, and occurrence of these agents, along with methods for evaluating the extent of exposure and approaches to controlling them are discussed in lectures and appropriate measurement instrumentation is demonstrated. A laboratory session on noise measurement is included. Applicable exposure standards, regulations, and guidelines are covered in detail. See Course Learning Objectives

GEHS 6720 PRINCIPLES OF INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE (3)
This course is designed to provide an introduction to the field of Industrial Hygiene. The objective of the course is to present an overview and historical perspective of Industrial Hygiene, anatomy and physiology of the skin and lungs, occupational diseases inhalation toxicology, chemical agents, biohazards, ergonomics, noise, thermal stress, indoor air quality, ventilation systems, laboratory safety, radiation safety, personal protective equipment, Hazard Communication and other OSHA standards and community exposures and emergency planning. See Course Learning Objectives

GEHS 6900 PUBLIC HEALTH THREAT IN SURINAME (3)
The course will examine key public health issues affecting the health of Suriname’s ecosystem and its population. Through a series of lectures and fieldtrips, students will learn about the role of the ecosystem as a vital component of community health. A special area of focus will be the medicinal characteristics of plants. The course examines the risks posed by environmental contamination, specifically those risks related to mercury released from some small-scale gold mining operations. Students will employ community-based participatory research strategies to assess, manage, and communicate those risks. The course will also examine the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in Suriname. See Course Learning Objectives

GEHS 6910 ENVIRONMENTAL ASPECTS OF DISASTER RESPONSE (3)
This course examines the fundamentals of the environmental health and consequence management infrastructure through the lens of a disaster situation. Environmental health challenges that arise during emergencies are explored and operational models unique to disasters are developed. See Course Learning Objectives

GEHS 6920 ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING, SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS IN A DISASTER (3)
This course is designed to provide students with necessary knowledge and tools for sampling and monitoring of the environment following a disaster such as floods, hurricanes, earth quakes, explosions etc. During this course, students will also be exposed to field sampling and become familiar with laboratory instruments used for chemical, biological and physical sample analysis. See Course Learning Objectives

GEHS 6930 POPULATIONS ISSUES IN DISASTER MANAGEMENT: SHELTER, ACUTE CARE, IMMUNIZATION, FORENSICS (3)
Introduces basic fundamentals of disaster management at Federal, state and community level, of natural or man‐made disasters based on US National Response Frameworks of the US Dept of Homeland Security and other relevant guidance. Primary focus is on public health and medical services plus related functions of sheltering and human services. See Course Learning Objectives

GEHS 6940 ENVIRONMENTAL ASPECTS OF DISASTER RECOVERY (3)
This course addresses the process of disaster recovery as the most costly and complex phase of the disaster cycle. The content focuses on critical outcome standards guiding actions during the recovery phase of a disaster to achieve community preparedness. See Course Learning Objectives

GEHS 6950 PSYCHOSOCIAL ASPECTS OF DISASTERS (3)
The course covers the theoretical development, history, and empirical studies of the psychosocial dynamics and sequelae of disasters. Characteristics and types of disasters, reactions and risk factors, as well as trends in disaster mental health are examined. Emphasis is placed on inclusion of psychosocial considerations in the planning, response, and recovery phases of a disaster. Vulnerable populations are of particular interest in highly interactive case-based learning. Through interdisciplinary team labs, students apply lecture concepts and real time assignments in situations such as natural disaster, environmental health crises, pandemic illness, humanitarian crises, or threats to national security. Baseline resilience planning is required of all students planning to work in crisis or emergency response fields. Prerequisites: Social work students must have foundation courses completed. Public health, medicine, or other students should check with their advisor or department chair for the applicability of the course to their academic program. See Course Learning Objectives

GEHS 6960 PUBLIC HEALTH LAW (3)
Population-based preventative health intervention is a major focus of public health. Public health law speaks to the legal aspects of delivering this intervention to the society. This course introduces students to the functions and outcomes of public health law from local to global, and provides a hands-on legal tool for public health protection and practice. It covers a variety of topics such as the public health powers of the federal, state and local governments; civil liberties in matters such as quarantine, isolation and mandated medical testing; access to healthcare; liability of healthcare workers; incentives to vaccine makers, emergency use authorization of drugs in declared public health disaster/emergency situations, international law on the duties and rights of countries to control the spread of infectious diseases, the role of the World Health Organization and other global entities in protecting public health, and public health issues arising from migrants and refugee problems. See Course Learning Objectives

GEHS 7000 DEPARTMENTAL SEMINAR (0, 1)
Students will both listen to and present seminars in this course. They will receive instruction on literature searches, outlining, preparing and presenting a seminar. Members of the department and invited speakers will meet weekly to discuss current research in environmental health sciences. Attendance at seminars is required of all students enrolled in all GEHS degree programs each semester. This seminar course must be taken for 1 credit in the final semester for students who are pursuing MPH or MSPH degrees. Based on the culminating experience work, a student will develop a seminar and present it to earn this 1 credit. See Course Learning Objectives

GEHS 7100 COMMUNITY RESILIENCE PH DISRSE(3) 
The course examines the definitions, dimensions, and determinants of community resilience (CR) in terms of a community’s ability to absorb, recover from, and adapt to natural, technological, and man-made disasters. Definitions from the research literature as well as from major professional agency or governmental reports are analyzed for common themes to promote broader understanding of the term “community resilience” that may be applied appropriately across disaster types and geographic locations. Community resilience is analyzed across four major dimensions of environmental, social, political, and economic factors and then specific determinants and indicators within each dimension identified. Students are expected to integrate and discuss the intersecting nature of the dimensions in articulating and writing about their knowledge of community resilience for any one particular location. Theories of coping, recovery, and post-disaster transition as well as evidence-based models of assessing or measuring community resilience are critiqued for their usefulness in emergency planning and response. The primary focus is that of being able to locate and analyze community resilience indicators in collaboration with EM personnel, community citizens, and other leaders in emergency planning, preparedness, response and recovery efforts. Methods to promote community resilience are considered within an intervention context for broad community applications, whether with an acute one-time hazardous event or with ongoing hazardous conditions and threats in a given community. See Course Learning Objectives  

GEHS 7110 INDUSTRIAL VENTILATION AND CHEMICAL HAZARD CONTROL (3)
This course covers the control and management of chemical hazards in the workplace and indoor environments through engineering, administrative change, and personal protective equipment. The selection, use, and limitations of respiratory protective equipment are discussed. Engineering controls covered include product substitution, process isolation, and ventilation. The fundamentals of design and operation of local exhaust and general dilution ventilation systems are covered in detail and include basic air flow, general dilution ventilation, exhaust hood design, duct design, fans, air cleaning and recirculation, system balancing, system evaluation and special ventilation systems. A laboratory session on evaluating ventilation system performance is included. See Course Learning Objectives

GEHS 7140 INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE ASPECTS OF PLANT OPERATIONS (2)
Prerequisite(s): ENHS 6720 or permission of instructor This course emphasizes the recognition, evaluation, and control of potential hazards associated with plant operations.  Basic equipment and process descriptions for various manufacturing operations are covered.  This course is also designed to introduce students to various functions of an industrial hygienist in the workplace and will enable them to apply knowledge from the classroom to field conditions. Invited speakers from local industries, government and labor will present challenges faced by health and safety professionals.  Students will have an opportunity to observe industrial hygiene processes in oil refining and chemical manufacturing and other manufacturing operations. Visits range from local industrial hygiene operations on the corporate level to plant and field activities.  See Course Learning Objectives

GEHS 7270 PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES RESEARCH (3)
Practical Applications of Environmental Health Research is a course designed to provide students an approach to the conceptualization, design, and operational logistics for planning and implementing studies and responses to environmental health problems and field studies. The course will focus on applied public health problems and situations that may challenge an environmental health professional in determining studies that can be implemented. Problems discussed will apply to many environmental health issues including environmental assessment and health studies. Identifying primary study questions will be discussed and how to establish study goals to address those questions. Types of study designs will be reviewed including issues of strengths and limitations of different study designs, study biases, how to identify relationships between study variables and concepts of causality, and identifying and defining important variables as data for analysis. The course will also consider practical issues in implementing studies including resources, field work, and protection of human study participants. The course is applicable to environmental health students focusing on epidemiology, health education, environmental sciences, or other field application of environmental public health practice. Students are expected to develop and present a study proposal applicable to their specific area of environmental health. The methods described are the conceptual approach to problem solving in environmental health practice. Although statistical issues may be discussed, specific statistical methods will not be a topic of focus. Also, the aspects of technical instrumentation, such as laboratory analysis or the use of environmental hygiene instruments, are not a focus of this course. See Course Learning Objectives

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GEHS 7400 FIELD AND LABORATORY APPLICATIONS OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH PRACTICES (3)

This course consists of field and laboratory work dealing with the identification, assessment and isolation of environmental health problems. It is designed to provide the students an opportunity to observe and work with real-life settings of environmental health problems in the field, i.e. food establishments, schools , water, sewage, etc. Students conduct environmental health exercises and make analysis of problems situations on-site . Students collect and analyze environmental samples when possible. Written reports of each exercise are required. All reports will be discussed and methods of remedies for environmental health violation corrections will also be discussed. See Course Learning Objectives

GEHS 7430 LABRATORY METHODS IN ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES (3)
Laboratory Methods in Environmental Health Sciences is a course designed to provide students with analytical laboratory training in skills and techniques specific to Environmental Health Science (EHS) practice. Students will gain experience in the following techniques; Environmental Sampling, Biological and Environmental analyte extraction, in vitro, culturing. Analytical methods covered in the course will be Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA), Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrophotometry (GC-MS), Liquid Chromatograph (HPLC), Cell Viability (MTS Assay). Using a field case study as a tool to bridge theory to practice, each core area will be taught in independently connected learning modules. See Course Learning Objectives

GEHS 7500 AIR SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS (3)
The principles and techniques for measuring and evaluating airborne contaminants in the work and community environments are presented in lectures and practiced in laboratory sessions. Covered topics include air flow measurements, aerosol science, particulate sampling with and without size separation, optical microscopy, active and passive sampling of gases and vapors, direct reading instruments, stack sampling, atmospheric dispersion modeling, and sampling strategy and statistical data analysis. See Course Learning Objectives

GEHS 7620 HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT (3)          
Principles of quantitative human health risk assessment. This course develops the qualitative and quantitative skills necessary to evaluate the probability of health effects from exposure to environmental contaminants. Basic concepts of qualitative and quantitative risk assessment are demonstrated with practical case studies. Emphasis is place on hazard identification, dose-response evaluation, exposure assessment, and risk characterization. Integration of risk assessment with risk management and communicating risks to the public are discussed. Regulatory aspects of risk assessment in the promulgation of environmental standards are presented. See Course Learning Objectives

GEHS 7750 ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY (3)
GEHS 7750 introduces students to the concepts of public health policy with an emphasis on environmental health. The course describes the relationship among public health science, policy, and practice and demonstrates the application of this relationship through a series of real cases in environmental health. The curriculum includes an analysis of the key national environmental health laws, policies, regulations, and statutes in the context of public health. Through “hands on” experience, students examine the policy implications of contemporary environmental public health issues. See Course Learning Objectives

GEHS 7910 ENVIRONMENTAL DISASTER RESPONSE PLANNING & IMPLEMENTATION (3)
This course addresses the planning and public/ health system infrastructure critical to address environmental health issues arising from natural and human made disasters. The effective use of the resources in the face of different types of disasters is explored. See Course Learning Objectives

GEHS 7930 SPECIAL NEEDS IN DISASTER RESPONSE (3)
This course characterizes the special needs of vulnerable populations in a crises environment as well as the special needs imposed on a population at large in the evolution of disaster, and provides insight into optimally dealing with the unthinkable so as to most effectively apply available resources in maximizing community and individual survival under extraordinary circumstances. See Course Learning Objectives

GEHS 7950 PSYCHOSOCIAL INTERVENTIONS IN DISASTER OR CRISIS (3)
The course covers the development and application of both brief solution focused and crisis intervention methods within the context of biopsychosocial resolution in healthy human development and social functioning. Emphasis is placed on practical application of techniques in situations such as natural disaster, manmade disasters, public health crises, death, traumatic injury or illness, pandemics, violent crime, terrorism, suicide, chronic physical and mental conditions, and severe family dysfunction that impacts society. The clinical-community approach is demonstrated through case-based learning and simulations. Students are expected to outline public health and social work partnerships and models for delivery of psychosocial interventions. See Course Learning Objectives

GEHS 8850 METHODS IN TOXICOLOGICAL RESEARCH
The Methods in Toxicological Research course is made available for students pursuing doctoral studies in Global Environmental Health Sciences. The student, in consultation with the mentor, identifies a suitable toxicological problem. This toxicological research problem is limited in scope such that it can be accomplished within the semester. The student and mentor consult the literature, formulate a research hypothesis, and then test it in the laboratory. Experimental techniques used in modern research are discussed, demonstrated, and then carried out by the student. The student prepares a research report to successfully complete the course. See Course Learning Objectives

GEHS 8860 GENETIC AND MOLECULAR TOXICOLOGY
Genetic and molecular Toxicology is a doctoral level course that addresses the causes and effects of alterations to the hereditary material and the elucidation of fundamental mechanisms of toxicity. Spontaneous and chemically induced mutations are covered in depth in this course. The roles of cellular and genetic regulation in the induction of responses to DNA damage are explored. Merits of verious experimental systems for the detection and analysis of DNA damage and mutations are examined. Effects of mutations, polymorphisms, and epigenetic factors on human disease (cancers, aging, and other chronic diseases) and health maintenance are discussed in this course. See Course Learning Objectives

 

 
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GEHS, 1440 Canal Street, Suite 2100, New Orleans, LA 70112, 504-988-5374 gehsinfo@tulane.edu