Tulane recognized as ‘industry pioneer’ in sustainable building

October 24, 2012 10:00 AM

Alicia Duplessis Jasmin
aduples@tulane.edu

Tulane University has been named a 2012 Operational Excellence Champion by the Louisiana chapter of the U.S. Green Building Council in recognition of the university’s “leadership in transforming the built environment” and its role as a sustainability leader in Louisiana.
 

Weatherhead Hall

Weatherhead Hall is one of three LEED-certified buildings on the Tulane uptown campus. (Photo by Paula Burch-Celentano)


The award follows the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification, also presented by the council, of Weatherhead Hall and the Hertz Center 
on the uptown campus.  Both buildings earned the USGBC’s LEED Gold rating.  
 

Renovations to Dinwiddie Hall 
in 2010 set the standard for building “green” by becoming the university’s first project to receive LEED certification.
 

“Our engagement with LEED has had a substantial impact on the way we approach design and construction,” says Liz Davey, director of the Office of Environmental Affairs. Tulane wants to make buildings more energy efficient and more comfortable for faculty, staff and students.
 



Here are some reasons why Weatherhead Hall and the Hertz Center are LEED-worthy:
 

Energy efficiency  

• Energy costs of Weatherhead Hall are projected to be 27.5 percent less than an average building; for the Hertz Center, 36 percent less.
• Occupancy sensors save energy by shutting off lights in hallways, stairwells and rooms not in use.

• Carbon dioxide sensors adjust the building’s ventilation based on the number of occupants.



Efficient water use


• Dual flush toilets help conserve water by giving the user a choice between a small flush (.8 gallons) and a large flush (1.6 gallons).

Sustainable materials


• Much of the building materials including steel, concrete and metal panels are made of recycled content.
• Court floors at the Hertz Center, a practice facility for basketball and volleyball, are made of wood certified to have been sustainably grown and harvested.

Davey says the staff of Capital Projects and Real Estate, the Office of the University Architect, Facility Services and the School of Architecture are all part of the “Tulane Green Machine,” leading the university’s sustainability efforts.

 

Citation information:

Page accessed: Monday, October 20, 2014
Page URL: http://tulane.edu/news/newwave/102412_leed.cfm

Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 504-865-5000 website@tulane.edu