Lab work
Kids have a passion for all things science
Darkness at night is key to breast cancer therapy
Baby Audubon
Business school mourns legendary accounting teacher
facebook
twitter
youtube

Career services office is expanding

August 13, 2013 9:00 AM

Mary Sparacello
msparace@tulane.edu

To better prepare students for the challenging job market, the Tulane Career Center is set to grow significantly. 

Career Wave

Career preparation enhancements are growing out of the inaugural Career Wave event held in January on the Tulane uptown campus. (Photo by Guillermo Cabrera-Rojo)


The expansion is possible because of generous gifts from two sets of Tulane parents, Jeffrey and Susan Zimmer and Cory and Lisa Rapkin, who funded a two-year pilot program.

Three new career educators-advisers will be hired in the fall, allowing undergraduates to enroll in a first-of-its-kind career preparation course launching in the spring.

“This is going to be a transformational opportunity for us,” says James MacLaren, dean of Newcomb-Tulane College.

Career educators will teach every aspect of the job search process during the one-credit career preparation course, and help students build a network of connections drawing on the university's alumni base as well as current and former parents.

When they aren’t teaching, advisers will also meet with their students to give personalized career guidance, says Amjad Ayoubi, senior associate dean of Newcomb-Tulane College and executive director of career services. More Tulane students will be getting enhanced career preparation earlier in their college careers, Ayoubi says.

The university and parents are partnering in a common goal: to ensure students have successful futures. The current career preparation enhancements grew out of the successful inaugural Career Wave, an intensive two-day career-planning event sponsored by the Rapkins and held on the Tulane University uptown campus in January.

The two-year pilot program itself will serve many Tulane undergraduates, but MacLaren is thinking long-term. He has started building an endowment to support more robust career preparation in perpetuity. Several donors, including former Tulane parents Lori and Jim Montana, made the first gifts to the endowment earlier this year.

“Colleges have a responsibility to not only provide an outstanding education,” says MacLaren, “but also to provide the resources and support to ensure that students can be successful in the next stage of their lives.”

Mary Sparacello is a writer in the Office of Development.


Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 504-865-5000 website@tulane.edu