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Video jockey adds 3D wizardry to events

June 24, 2014 11:00 AM

Sally Asher
sally@tulane.edu

Staff in the city

Quentin Ward paints with pixels instead of spray paint cans. With his passion for video mapping, he loosely terms himself an “electronic graffiti artist.” Ward, a user systems analyst for Tulane University for the past five years, uses various technologies to video map at live events and music festivals around the city.

Quentin Ward

Quentin Ward, a user systems analyst on staff at Tulane University, uses various technologies as a video jockey at live events and music festivals around the city. (Photo by Sally Asher)


Video mapping, according to Ward, is a projection technology that turns objects, often irregularly shaped, into display surfaces for video projection. While the brilliant images, decorative style and 3D wizardry are similar to graffiti art, its evanescent qualities rival the experiences of the live performances it accompanies.

Ward first became interested in video mapping while working as a graphic designer. 

“One day one of my friends asked if I could design animation for a projection that would play behind him during his show. After word got out that I was able to not only design the flyer but also come up with visual looks for the show, I became the go-to VJ (visual jockey) among my friends who just happen to be promoters, musicians and artists.”

His creative opportunities soon multiplied.

The ability to take a sketch or idea from a production manager, musician or corporate client and make it come to life on a massive scale is something that Ward enjoys. He specializes in interaction design, live branding and live audio-visual production. 

Ward is actively conceptualizing new ideas and developing new technologies for events, from 3D mapping to video content for interactive installations. He also appreciates the collaborative efforts with the small group of VJs working in the industry. 

Although a flash of pixels across a screen is not permanent, Ward’s influence on this modern art and technology may be.

Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 504-865-5000 website@tulane.edu