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DONATE NOW to push your class higher on the list (and to support Tulane). See your class Donor Honor Roll >>

Class Gifts

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Goal: $400,000

To Date: $156,981



Class Donors


Goal: 300

To Date: 175

 

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CLASS OF 1972's 40th YEAR REUNION

 

Brown  |  Hammar  |  Hurley


JoBeth Brown

joebethbrown "It's important to give back, keep Tulane strong and make it a great place for future generations to attend."-- JoBeth Brown, NC '72

 

Only in New Orleans

I lived four years on campus so I experienced all that campus life had to offer. Broadway looks much better than when I was there, but that's where we hung out, near Oak Street and throughout the Riverbend area (along with frequent trips to the French Quarter). A few landmarks stand out in my mind. Camellia Grill, of course, Eddie Price's (now The Boot), Nick's Bar on Tulane, and William's Plum St. Snoball Stand. Uptown was a wonderful place to live, and Tulane's campus across from Audubon Park seemed like a perfect location.

 

Only at Tulane

Undergraduates from the class of 1972 were in college from the fall of 1968 to the spring of 1972, from the end of the '60s to the early '70s, and those two periods in time could not have been more different. It was just a complete change from freshman to senior year. During freshman year, I lived in J.L. and we wore dresses to class, had to sign out of the dorm after 8 p.m. and we dressed up for football games at Tulane Stadium. By junior year, the campus had become completely liberated. The anti-war movement took over the UC, the Mushroom opened on Broadway and people wore jeans everywhere. When I left, there were almost no rules. Our class could not have been in college during a time that had more change.

 

Only Us

Tulane's size is really great. It's big enough to have everything you need but small enough to know all of your professors and many of the students. Hurricane Katrina awakened everyone to what we need to do for Tulane and New Orleans. It's really important to give back to where you went to college because that's what helped make you who you are now. If you haven't been back to New Orleans in the last 10 years, you should go. It's a really great place to be."

 

 

Kevin Hammar

kevin  "Our reunion is an opportunity to revisit where you came from. It's an opportunity to see people who mattered to you 40 years ago, to meet classmates you didn't know then who might matter to you in the future, and to take pride in what Tulane tried to accomplish 40 years ago and in what it has accomplished since then, particularly since Hurricane Katrina." --Kevin Hammar, A&S'72

 

Only in New Orleans

Coming from the West, New Orleans was a really big city, congested, and with such extremes between old money and poverty. Because of where Tulane is, in such a beautiful part of New Orleans, it attracted an international student body from all over the world. It wasn't unusual to have different languages spoken as you walked around campus.

As I got off the campus, I came to love New Orleans more and more. I saw the city as a bit of a gem and a really unusual place, one of three to four cities in the U.S. that has its own unique identify. If you're in New Orleans, you know you're in New Orleans. The city really has this distinct flavor and I came to love the music, the food, and to become conscious of the history of the place that was all around us..

 

Only at Tulane

I grew up in Colorado Springs, so I was looking for a liberal arts school with a Navy ROTC program, a relatively small student body, a good library and a variety of undergraduate programs, all located in a city. I also wanted warm winters and a private school setting. Tulane fit the bill. I had some fabulous teachers, particularly in the English department where I studied, and some great graduate assistants in math and history and French. Tulane was a below-the-radar kind of place at that time, at least to someone outside the South. But Tulane has always stood and continues to stand for the importance of being educated and the importance of critical thinking. My professors were tremendously educated people who could convey in their lectures this profundity of learning.

My Tulane experience as an English major instilled in me a set of values that allowed me to pick my own course in life.  It wasn't important to me to make a whole lot of money, and at Tulane you learn there's great value in a life well-lived, and that there's meaning all around you. That was particularly important in the service because even in the later 70's there was a considerable amount of public disowning of the military. I had to look internally to find  satisfaction in handling that sort of thing, and I think what I learned at Tulane allowed me to do that.

 

Only Us

Tulane was important to me and I want to do whatever I can do to help it out. Tulane has become an even better place, particularly since Katrina with its emphasis on public service. Tulane also has made significant efforts to be a more inclusive place and a more diverse place. If you come to campus and walk around and see all of the new buildings and the change, it's just amazing.

 

 

Patricia A. Hurley

 

 Hurley, Patricia 1"Plan to attend our reunion for another chance to see old friends and renew your acquaintance with many others."-- Patricia A. Hurley, NC'72

 

Only in New Orleans

On a spring-like January day in 2011 I walked across the Tulane campus. Several trees were festooned with Mardi Gras beads that glittered in the sun – only in New Orleans. Every person I encountered on campus that morning was smiling and said hello with genuine warmth. That warmth and spirit are characteristic of people all over the city. And although New Orleans is famous for its food, music and celebrations, it is the people who give the city the character that so many of us love.

 

Only at Tulane

Our experiences as undergraduates played a major role in making us the people we are today. We were fortunate to attend a university with small classes and professors who took a serious interest in their students. Without Dr. Jean Danielson in particular I would not have made the choice I did for graduate school and that made a major difference in my life. We all met best friends there and remain in close touch with many of them.

 

Only Us

The post-Katrina Tulane and the post-Katrina New Orleans are both the same and different places than they were from 1968 to 1972. Much of the important work of Newcomb College is now done by the Newcomb College Institute, which offers programs to enhance women's leadership capacity. At the same time, it maintains traditions such as Big Sisters as mentors for first-year students. We can move the university forward and maintain our connection to our past by contributing to the 1972 class gift.

Alumni & Reunions Weekend, 504-865-5794, 888-265-7576 reunions@tulane.edu