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Networking


Many people use the classified ads as their sole job search technique. Unfortunately, statistics show that only 10-20% of jobs are ever published— that means that 80-90% of jobs remain hidden in the job market. For this reason, networking remains the number one job search strategy.

Networking Defined:
A network is an interconnected group of supporters who serve as resources for your job search and ultimately for your career. Some great network contacts might include people you meet at business and social meetings. These individuals can provide you with career information and advice. Students often hesitate to network because they feel awkward asking for help, but it should be an integral part of any job search. Though you might feel nervous when approaching a potential contact, networking is a skill that develops with practice, so don’t give up. Most people love to talk about themselves and about their jobs, and are willing to give realistic — and free — advice.


Eight Keys to Networking

  1. Be Prepared

    First, define what information you need and what you are trying to accomplish by networking. Remember, your purpose in networking is to get to know people who can provide information regarding careers and leads. Some of the many benefits of networking include increased visibility within your field, propelling your professional development, finding suitable mentors, increasing your chances of promotion and perhaps finding your next job. Second, know yourself—your education, experience and skills. Practice a concise, one-minute presentation of yourself so that people will know the kinds of areas in which you are interested. Your networking meeting should include the following elements: introduction, self-overview, Q&A, obtaining referrals and closing.

  2. Be Targeted

    Identify your network. For some, “I don’t have a network. I don’t know anyone,” may be your first reaction. You can start by listing everyone you know who are potential prospects: family members, friends, faculty, neighbors, classmates, alumni, bosses, co-workers and community associates. Attend meetings of organizations in your field of interest and get involved. You never know where you are going to meet someone who could lead you to your next job.

  3. Be Professional

    Ask your networking prospects for advice—not for a job. Your networking meetings should be a source of career information, advice and contacts. Start off the encounter with a firm handshake, eye contact and a warm smile. Focus on asking for one thing at a time. Your contacts expect you to represent yourself with your best foot forward.

  4. Be Patient

    Heena Noorani, research analyst with New York-based Thomson Financial, recommends avoiding the feeling of discouragement if networking does not provide immediate results or instant answers. She advises, “Be prepared for a slow down after you get started. Stay politely persistent with your leads and build momentum. Networking is like gardening: You do not plant the seed, then quickly harvest. Networking requires cultivation that takes time and effort for the process to payoff.”

  5. Be Focused on Quality—Not Quantity

    In a large group setting, circulate and meet people, but don’t try to talk to everyone. It’s better to have a few meaningful conversations than 50 hasty introductions. Don’t cling to people you already know; you’re unlikely to build new contacts that way. If you are at a reception, be sure to wear a nametag and collect or exchange business cards so you can later contact the people you meet.

  6. Be Referral-Centered

    The person you are networking with may not have a job opening, but he or she may know someone who is hiring. The key is to exchange information and then expand your network by obtaining additional referrals each time you meet someone new. Be sure to mention the person who referred you.

  7. Be Proactive

    Stay organized and track your networking meetings. Keep a list of your contacts and update it frequently with the names of any leads given to you. Send a thank-you note or e-mail if appropriate. Ask if you can follow-up the conversation with a phone call, or even better, with a more in-depth meeting in the near future.

  8. Be Dedicated to Networking

    Most importantly, networking should be ongoing. You will want to stay in touch with contacts over the long haul—not just when you need something. Make networking part of your long-term career plan.



Questions to Ask During Networking

  • What do you like most (least) about your work?
  • Can you describe a typical workday or week?
  • What type of education and experience do you need to remain successful in this field?
  • What are the future career opportunities in this field?
  • What are the challenges in balancing work and personal life?
  • Why do people enter/leave this field or company?
  • Which companies have the best track record for promoting minorities?
  • What advice would you give to someone trying to break into this field?
  • With whom would you recommend I speak? When I call, may I use your name?

Do's and Don'ts of Networking

  • Do keep one hand free from your briefcase or purse so you can shake hands when necessary.
  • Do bring copies of your résumé.


  • Don’t tell them your life story; you are dealing with busy people, so get right to the point.
  • Don’t be shy or afraid to ask for what you need.
  • Don’t pass up opportunities to network.

Examples of Successful Networking

Outreach example

When speaking to a prospective network contact, make sure to be polite, professional and as eloquent as possible. But don't panic! This is much simpler than you might think.

It is important to use proper grammar and diction when writing a letter to a prospective contact. A poorly written letter sends the wrong first message.

Remember to send a thank you note! Networking is a process which only works if developed over time. Send a thank you note to make sure that future correspondence with your new contact will be warmly welcomed.


Tulane University Career Center, New Orleans, LA 70118 504-865-5107 csc@tulane.edu