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Ted Buchanan

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 Tulane Empowers

Match game on campus looks for potential donors
Students are swabbing the cheeks of volunteers, whose tissue data will be entered into the National Bone Marrow Registry.
 
Ceremony celebrates teacher, architect and author
Professor John Klingman is invested as the Richard Koch Chair of Architecture.
 
Photo: Scientific framework
Steel girders are in place for a new $7.4 million science building on the uptown campus, the Donna and Paul Flower Hall for Research and Innovation.
 
Let us count the ways you empower
Every day, members of the Tulane community endeavor to make the world a better place. Are you working to make a difference in your community? We want to hear from you.
 
Finding a path to social justice
Aaron Schneider, the Glazer Professor in Social Entrepreneurship, wants to use his endowed professorship to view social innovation through a social justice lens. View the video.
 
MBA Grads Help Rebirth of Small Businesses
Financial firm is one of three companies with Tulane ties that are winners in the Idea Village Entrepreneurship Challenge.

Physicist has key to greener polymer manufacturing

Reed's technology will help the industry become greener and more efficient. 

Wayne Reed
Wayne Reed’s patented technology allows real-time monitoring of polymer reactions, which are necessary to produce materials used in planes, cars, electronics and more. (Photo by Paula Burch-Celentano)

 

April 16, 2012

Michael Ramos
mcramos@tulane.edu

Tulane University physicist Wayne Reed says he wants to revolutionize the polymer manufacturing sector, an important component of the global economy. Through his patented technology, Reed and colleagues see a $100 billion opportunity in the $1.2 trillion polymer industry, and the key to helping this industry become greener and more efficient.

Reed’s method allows real-time monitoring of polymer reactions, which are necessary to produce materials used in planes, cars, paint, adhesives, coatings, fertilizers, electronics, medicine and more. Currently, polymers are created using recipes with the results often left to chance, he says. More...

 

 

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