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Ted Buchanan

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Physicist has key to greener polymer manufacturing

Reed's technology will help the industry become greener and more efficient. 

Wayne Reed
Wayne Reed’s patented technology allows real-time monitoring of polymer reactions, which are necessary to produce materials used in planes, cars, electronics and more. (Photo by Paula Burch-Celentano)

 

April 16, 2012

Michael Ramos
mcramos@tulane.edu

Tulane University physicist Wayne Reed says he wants to revolutionize the polymer manufacturing sector, an important component of the global economy. Through his patented technology, Reed and colleagues see a $100 billion opportunity in the $1.2 trillion polymer industry, and the key to helping this industry become greener and more efficient.

Reed’s method allows real-time monitoring of polymer reactions, which are necessary to produce materials used in planes, cars, paint, adhesives, coatings, fertilizers, electronics, medicine and more. Currently, polymers are created using recipes with the results often left to chance, he says. More...

 

 

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