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Ted Buchanan

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 Tulane Empowers

Food as medicine
Things are cooking at the Goldring Center for Culinary Medicine where students are learning how to use food as medicine and teaching community members nutrition skills. View the video.
 
Her idea: Helping others reach the ‘American Dream’
Tulane Urban Innovation Fellow Julia McNabb wants to help artists, musicians, small business owners and others plan for the future.
 
Social work students see advocacy in action
Led by faculty, students observe the Occupy Wall Street organizational structure in Washington, D.C.
 
Health Clinic Gets Funding for HIV Care
Dr. MarkAlain Dery says placing HIV care within an “ordinary health clinic” is part of a trend to destigmatize HIV.
 
Program Plants Youth on Urban Tract
Blue Cross Blue Shield and Whole Foods sponsor Grow Dat Youth Farm, a project of Tulane City Center.
 
Center Links Campus and Community
New initiative will enable students to engage in innovative learning both within and outside the classroom.

New lab combats deadly diseases

The Diboll Lab is expected to impact the size and quality of research grants the school will attract. 

diboll lab ribbon cutting
Members of the Diboll Foundation, Herschell Abott (left) and David Edwards (center), are joined by Dean Pierre Buekens (right) of the School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine to dedicate the Diboll Lab on May 15.

 

June 21, 2012

Wavemakers Staff
mdonofr@tulane.edu

A child dies of malaria about every 30 seconds, according to Ahmed Aly, assistant professor at the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. The new, state-of-the-art Collins C. Diboll Laboratory for Emerging Infectious Diseases was dedicated May 15 at the J. Bennett Johnston building on Tulane Avenue to work toward gradual elimination of malaria and change that statistic forever.   

“At Tulane, we are working on the development of vaccines to stop infection and transmission of human malaria parasites. In our research we are also using the mouse model for initial discovery research. Once we make these initial findings, we can test the concept for human malaria parasites and possibly develop a vaccine that will prevent the disease completely,” said Nirbhay Kumar, professor and chair of the Department of Tropical Medicine.  

The new lab, which is expected to impact the size and quality of research grants the school will attract, is part of a legacy at Tulane stretching back more than a century. According to Tulane provost Michael Bernstein, the Medical College of Louisiana, Tulane’s predecessor, was founded in 1834 specifically to examine vector- borne diseases.   

“The studies of malaria, West Nile, dengue and other vector-borne viruses that will take place in the Diboll laboratory reflect our institutional roots,” he said. “It is due to the success of the scientists who came together so long ago that New Orleans is no longer called a necropolis.”

Among those trailblazing doctors of yesteryear was Collins Diboll’s great-grandfather, Dr. Joseph S. Copes. Two hundred years ago, he devoted his medical career to the eradication of yellow fever, smallpox and cholera, all of which plagued New Orleans in that era.   

Diboll Foundation trustee David Edwards (A&S ’71, L ’72) noted that Collins Diboll (A ’26) made certain suggestions in his will to provide for public health and tropical medicine at his alma mater and keep his great-grandfather’s legacy alive. 

“Collins’s tremendous pride was his great-grandfather,” said Edwards, a member of the Board of Tulane. “The opening of this new lab two centuries later is very propitious. It has also been 25 years since Collins died, and he’d be very proud of what the foundation and Tulane have done in that short time.”   

The Diboll Foundation has supported the Joseph S. Copes Chair in Epidemiology, the Collins C. Diboll Auditorium and Gallery, the annual fund and continuing education at the school.     

“Tulane has always been involved in public health, tropical medicine and the eradication of diseases,” says Dean Pierre Buekens. “This history gives weight to what we’re doing, and today is another leap forward in our efforts to eliminate some of the world’s most contagious and deadliest diseases.”     


 

 

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