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Ted Buchanan

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 Tulane Empowers

Cooking up teachable moments
Alumnus Adam Aronovitz, cofounder of The Cookbook Project, travels the world looking for ways to turn encounters with local food into ways to educate youth about nutrition.
 
Photos: High honor for philanthropists
In honor of total giving to Tulane University of at least $1 million, 31 individuals and organizations are inducted into the Paul Tulane Society.
 
Students work together to rebuild wetlands
Tulane University and Nunez Community College students collaborate to improve water quality.
 
Program Plants Youth on Urban Tract
Blue Cross Blue Shield and Whole Foods sponsor Grow Dat Youth Farm, a project of Tulane City Center.
 
Pro Bono Work Earns Top Award
Tulane Law School has been named Law School of the Year by the Pro Bono Project of Southeastern Louisiana.
 
Getting It Done in Disease-ravaged Haiti
Public health researchers rise above politics to help the Caribbean nation that has endured earthquakes and cholera.

Endowed chair pioneers new path for engineering at Tulane

Douglas Chrisey invested as Cornelia and Arthur L. Jung Chair in Materials Engineering 

Endowed chair pioneers new path for engineering at Tulane
From left, Leslie Williamson, A. Louis Jung III, Dr. Douglas Chrisey, Dean Nick Altiero and Carroll Jung Williamson gather at the Jung investiture ceremony on Jan. 30. (Photo by Tracie Morris Schaefer)

February 8, 2013  

Matt Roberts
mrobert1@tulane.edu

The School of Science and Engineering welcomed Douglas Chrisey as the new Cornelia and Arthur L. Jung Chair in Materials Engineering during an investiture ceremony inside Freeman Auditorium on Jan. 30. Chrisey, who also serves as adjunct professor of biomedical engineering, joined the Tulane faculty in the fall after teaching at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, NY.

“Dr. Chrisey’s work disrupts the status quo and pushes innovation,” says Nick Altiero, dean of the School of Science and Engineering. “An interdisciplinary approach to science and engineering draws on the strengths of each field to give our students an edge in thinking about solutions to the problems presented to them.”

Created in 1994 through generous gifts from Harriett T. and Arthur L. Jung Jr. (E ’38) and matching funds from the Louisiana Board of Regents, the chair was originally established to advance expertise in mechanical engineering. The chair is named in honor of Arthur L. Jung Jr.’s parents. 

The School of Science and Engineering was created in the wake of Hurricane Katrina as part of Tulane’s Renewal Plan. Included in the vision for the school was a new major in engineering physics that would focus on the burgeoning field of nanotechnology, and the Jungs were courageous enough to be part of this bold new direction by revising their original gift agreement.

Altiero says the new chair helps support the vision for Science and Engineering to unite scientific ideas with engineering’s hands-on approach to solving problems.

The investiture was attended by the couple’s children, Arthur Louis Jung III, a 1968 graduate of the College of Arts and Sciences and a past member of the School of Liberal Arts Advisory Board, and Carroll Tolar Jung Williamson, a 1974 graduate of Newcomb College. 

“My father would have been happy with this choice,” says Arthur Louis Jung III. “He served Tulane for many years in a number of capacities, and always made supporting and advancing Tulane a priority. Both he and my mother were very proud of being inducted into the Paul Tulane Society in 1996.”

A Legacy of Giving
A.L. Jung Sr. built the Jung Hotel in New Orleans in 1925, which would become the largest convention facility in the city for many decades. The Tulane Room, a rooftop ballroom with a retractable roof, was a favored location for dances, meetings and Mardi Gras balls, and the 18-story, 900-room hotel is remembered fondly as an iconic Canal Street landmark. 

His son graduated from Tulane with a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering before going on to become director of Pan-American Life and chairman of the board of Jung Enterprises, a real estate investment firm. 

In addition to sitting on numerous boards in private sector enterprises, Arthur Jung Jr. dedicated his time to a variety of civic endeavors, including high-level service with the Boy Scouts of America and two decades on the Board of Tulane from 1961-1981. He died on April 16, 2005. His wife, Harriett Tolar Jung, studied art at Newcomb College in the 1930s and currently sits on the Newcomb Art Gallery Advisory Board. The Jungs were sponsors of “Deborah Kass: The Warhol Project,” an exhibition at the gallery in 2000, and a drawing studio in the Woldenberg Art Center was dedicated in their honor in 1996.

The chair was previously held by Robert Watts.

Matt Roberts is a writer in the Office of Development.

 

 

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