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Mardi Gras Indians are a New Orleans cultural treasure recently highlighted in the HBO series Treme. "To mask Indian" is a commitment – it takes thousands of hours to sew a new suit. The creations are annual works of art - sculptures of resplendent feathers and beaded workmanship. Tulane Law students are helping Mardi Gras Indians gain the same copyright protection as other artists, to ensure the future of new suits for carnivals to come.



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Tulane University created community service projects in response to Hurricane Katrina. We integrated community engagement into the core curriculum because we recognized the far-reaching impact our students could have.  Today, partnerships with our neighbors, here and around the globe, are a cornerstone of Tulane.  Watch this story about how Tulane architecture students are bringing New Orleanians home.


 

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After Hurricane Katrina, many of us coped with the stress of the disaster by overeating.  It is easy to overindulge in one of the world's best culinary cities.  Plus, Louisiana is one of the fattest states in the nation! Tulane medical students decided to do something about it.  They started “Don’t Weight to Lose” to help New Orleanians gain good health by losing a few pounds. Take a look.


 

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Terrible doesn’t even scratch the surface when it comes to describing New Orleans’ public schools before Hurricane Katrina.  They were among the worst performing in the country.  Right after the storm, Tulane students pitched in to clean up and rebuild schools so they could reopen as New Orleanians returned home.  Then they turned their attention to helping students make the most of their school days.  Watch how one student is helping a young girl to dream big.


 

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Recently a memo was making the rounds at Tulane that spoke of the university’s response to the “oil spoil.”  It was a typo (the writer meant “oil spill”) but think about it.  Some believe the disaster spoiled parts of the Gulf, at least for now.  Experts tend to disagree on its long-term effects, but knowing where the oil is will help determine future consequences. One Tulane student has rallied local communities with low and high tech means to track its path. Watch how he does it.


 

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A few days after Hurricane Katrina left and the floods came, Tulane physicians opened a clinic on a street corner with a card table as their office.  Obviously since then facilities have greatly improved but the concept lingers -- neighborhood clinics where people can easily access proper, respectful medical care whether they have insurance or not.  Does it make a difference?  Watch how a Tulane community clinic keeps one patient from having to choose between medicine and food.





“No one will ever remember you for what you did for yourself, only for what you did for others.”


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