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  • Tulane architecture students are bringing New Orleanians home. WATCH
  • Tulane medical students are helping New Orleanians learn about good health. WATCH
  • Tulane volunteers work with public school students and inspire them to dream big. WATCH
  • Students at Tulane developed software that tracks damage from the recent oil spill. WATCH
  • A Tulane-operated neighborhood medical clinic offers help to a woman who would have to choose between buying medicine or groceries. WATCH
  • Law students are helping Mardi Gras Indians protect their cultural traditions. WATCH
  • Student-athletes inspire young public school children by sharing the collegiate experience. WATCH
  • How one Tulane junior raised funds to volunteer at a Tanzanian hospital. WATCH
  • Tulane students use Legos® to teach science and teamwork at elementary schools. WATCH
  • Through tutoring, Tulane students are helping cultivate New Orleans' musical traditions. WATCH
  • Alumni of Newcomb College return year after year to volunteer in New Orleans. WATCH
  • A Tulane doctor has been tracking the cardiovascular health of a town's residents for the past 39 years. WATCH
 
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Dr. Gerald Berenson started the Bogalusa Heart study in 1973 and tracked the cardiovascular health of the town's residents for the next 39 years. His groundbreaking research confirmed that coronary artery disease begins in childhood. So Dr. Berenson designed a prevention program that teaches lessons in life: A healthy diet can make for a good heart and the right choices will yield a lifetime of health. At 88 years old, he should know. Please watch.


 

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Most Tulane alumni will agree that you can leave New Orleans but it never leaves you.  A group of women who attended Newcomb College in the '60s are living proof. They have returned every year since Katrina to volunteer in New Orleans. They embody Tulane’s motto: “Not for one’s self, but for one’s own.” Please watch.


 

 
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Katrina washed away many of the resources used to cultivate the young musicians of New Orleans, whom we rely on to carry on the musical tradition of our city. Thanks to the "Roots of Music" program, students can join a marching band, as long as they keep their grades up. Tulane students are tutoring at this after school program, helping empower musicians through academics. Please watch.


 

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It is one thing to play with Legos®—the beloved plastic interlocking bricks that have captured the attention of children and adults for decades. It is an altogether different matter to use them to build and program a robotic vehicle. The 25 Tulane students who volunteered at eight elementary schools this semester can attest that Legos® are not toys. They are building blocks for learning science and teamwork. Please watch.


 

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Tulane junior Bob Lathrop spent last summer in Tanzania as a volunteer biomedical engineer, repairing medical equipment in a busy hospital. Bob personally raised $6,500 to fund the trip by promising supporting companies he would wear their corporate logos on his lab coat, just like elite NASCAR drivers display their sponsors. Watch this video and I think you will agree Bob Lathrop is a champion, too.


 

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Not only do Tulane student-athletes juggle the demands of a top academic institution with training and competing, many find time for the  young people of New Orleans. Recently, students from Pierre A. Capdau Elementary were on campus to shadow a student-athlete, accompanying them to class and learning about the collegiate experience. Organized by the Devlin Student-Athletes for Education (S-AFE) Center for Leadership, it is rewarding for both the students and the student-athletes. Please watch.


 

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Mardi Gras Indians are a New Orleans cultural treasure recently highlighted in the HBO series Treme. "To mask Indian" is a commitment – it takes thousands of hours to sew a new suit. The creations are annual works of art - sculptures of resplendent feathers and beaded workmanship. Tulane Law students are helping Mardi Gras Indians gain the same copyright protection as other artists, to ensure the future of new suits for carnivals to come.



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A few days after Hurricane Katrina left and the floods came, Tulane physicians opened a clinic on a street corner with a card table as their office.  Obviously since then facilities have greatly improved but the concept lingers -- neighborhood clinics where people can easily access proper, respectful medical care whether they have insurance or not.  Does it make a difference?  Watch how a Tulane community clinic keeps one patient from having to choose between medicine and food.




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Terrible doesn’t even scratch the surface when it comes to describing New Orleans’ public schools before Hurricane Katrina.  They were among the worst performing in the country.  Right after the storm, Tulane students pitched in to clean up and rebuild schools so they could reopen as New Orleanians returned home.  Then they turned their attention to helping students make the most of their school days.  Watch how one student is helping a young girl to dream big.


 

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After Hurricane Katrina, many of us coped with the stress of the disaster by overeating.  It is easy to overindulge in one of the world's best culinary cities.  Plus, Louisiana is one of the fattest states in the nation! Tulane medical students decided to do something about it.  They started “Don’t Weight to Lose” to help New Orleanians gain good health by losing a few pounds. Take a look.


 

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Tulane University created community service projects in response to Hurricane Katrina. We integrated community engagement into the core curriculum because we recognized the far-reaching impact our students could have.  Today, partnerships with our neighbors, here and around the globe, are a cornerstone of Tulane.  Watch this story about how Tulane architecture students are bringing New Orleanians home.


 

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Recently a memo was making the rounds at Tulane that spoke of the university’s response to the “oil spoil.”  It was a typo (the writer meant “oil spill”) but think about it.  Some believe the disaster spoiled parts of the Gulf, at least for now.  Experts tend to disagree on its long-term effects, but knowing where the oil is will help determine future consequences. One Tulane student has rallied local communities with low and high tech means to track its path. Watch how he does it.


 


“No one will ever remember you for what you did for yourself, only for what you did for others.”


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