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TIDES COURSE DESCRIPTIONS SPRING 2015

Course Catalog

TIDES courses marked with an asterisk (*) are Service Learning courses. Students in these courses must also register for the corresponding Service Learning component. 


*TIDB 1110  More Than Just Business; Business Leadership
M-F: 11:00am-12:15pm; 12:00-1:15pm; 12:30-1:45pm; 5:00-6:15pm, 6:00-7:15pm; and 6:30-7:45pm
Michael Hogg , Rob Hailey, Ashley Nelson, Kelly Grant, Amjad Ayoubi, Christopher Maitre, Rhonda Coignet, Erica Woodley, Brandon MacNeill,  Judy Vitrano,  Richter Fridman, Karen Van Buren, Quoc Hoang, Jered Bocage, Joshua Reyher, Sanda Groome, Hans Liljeberg, Chris Otten, Deborah Love, Jennifer Daniel, and Abigail Gaunt.

Our economic system and out society need leaders, bur how are those leaders born?  Our youngest leaders matured in the glow of computer screens; our oldest in the shadow of the Depression and World War II.  This class will examine how era and values shaped leaders from these two disparate groups affectionately labeled geeks and geezers.  During the journey, we hope to discover something more profound:  the process through which leaders of any era emerge.  
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TIDE 1010-05 Leadership, Politics, Power and Change
T 5:00-6:15pm
James MacLaren.
  Are leaders born or bred? How do leaders and their leadership styles impact change? How does one develop the courage and wisdom to lead and promote change effectively? This TIDE provides an opportunity to examine the nature of leadership, its impact on the change process, and the underlying dynamics of power, politics, and conflict.

Over the course of the academic semester, this TIDE focuses on developing an interdisciplinary understanding of the theories and practices of organizational and community leadership. As a TIDE member, you will actively study the theories that emerge from a variety of fields and reflect on their practical, political, and ethical assumptions as well as on their implications in a variety of settings. Through readings, classroom discussions, interviews with local leaders, and a group initiative, you will gain a greater appreciation for the issues that affect leaders and the components of successful leadership.
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TIDE 1030-01 The Music and Culture of New Orleans
W 4:30-5:45pm
Jessica Podewell.
"The Music and Culture of New Orleans" introduces the newcomer to New Orleans to the diversity of culture in the city and region. This course explores the music, literature, art, dance, architecture, and food that are unique to Southern Louisiana so that during your student years here you can fully enjoy them.

This TIDES course includes lectures by experts in the various aspects of the culture of New Orleans as well as helping each individual explore the city. Students are directed to the most important music venues in the city, as well as to the best Creole and Cajun restaurants. In addition to the class meetings, each student is expected to join in at least two field trips to witness the culture first hand.
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TIDE 1117-01 New Orleans: The Art of Masking Mayhem
W 4:00-5:15pm
Brittany Kennedy.
  When Mardi Gras is over and the Hand Grenades have been drunk, what is it exactly that makes New Orleans a unique place to live and work? This TIDES course will examine the city of New Orleans as a performance of various histories and cultures over time and space. In other words, we will look at New Orleans texts to show how “culture” and “history” are not static, eternal forms, but moldable ones that change when cultures experience various kinds of political and social “mayhem.” In so doing, we will answers questions like, “Why is French Quarter architecture actually Spanish?”; “Why in the late nineteenth century, did New Orleans boast that largest Italian-American population in the U.S.?; and “Why do people ‘Second Line?’” In short, the idea of what is “French” (or any other cultural community) has changed according to historical circumstance and cultural perspective, and the means by which such cultures change says a lot about who we are as a city and a nation.
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TIDE 1800-01 The Sweet Life
M 6:00-7:15pm
Michelle Kohler.
The central subjects of this course are pralines, beignets, bread pudding, bananas foster, gâteau de sirop, red velvet cake, molasses, sno-balls, and rum. Through a study of these regional sweets the course will unpack the complicated and sticky ways in which the agriculture and politics of sugar underwrites the economic and epicurean fabric of southern Louisiana. As the name of the brand Dixie Crystals suggests, in the south sugar is bound up with a particular regional fascination with sweetness, which belies its troubled heritage.
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FALL 2014 TIDES


*TIDB 1010 More Than Just Business
M-F: 11:00am-12:15pm; 12:00-1:15pm; 5:00-6:15pm and 6:00-7:15pm
Michael Hogg , Rob Hailey, Ashley Nelson, Amjad Ayoubi, Christopher Maitre, Rhonda Coignet, Erica Woodley, Brandon MacNeill, Judy Vitrano,  Richter Fridman, Karen Van Buren, Quoc Hoang, and Joshua Reyher.The "More Than Just Business" TIDES class will help you explore business structures from dot coms to international finance, and, in the process, will help you figure out why people enjoy and experience success in business. We will introduce you to leaders from a variety of business occupations and professions. Is there a relationship between an individual's personality and success in a particular branch of the business world? The objective of this TIDE is to enable students to think critically and become more informed both about the business decision making process as well as the factors that lead to success in the contemporary business world. The economic, ethical, political, cultural, and regulatory factors that influence outcomes in business often differ radically in the various international market places. Furthermore, local and global forces are often at odds with one another. Often, the individual business leader is caught in the middle of these conflicting forces.

Because business success requires navigation through these complex waters, this TIDE will explore the key facets of business decision-making that lead to successful outcomes by considering specific examples from the global and local economies. This TIDE offers students with an interest in a degree in business, economics, political economy, or philosophy, a unique opportunity to learn about the processes involved in successful business decision-making.
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*TIDB 1020-01-05 Law & Order
M 5:00-6:15pm (02); T 12:30-1:45pm (01) & 5:00-6:15pm (04), R 12:30-1:45pm (03) & 6:30-7:45pm (05)             
                                                                               
Sanda Groome, Hans Liljeberg, Chris Otten, and Deborah Love.In Henry VI, Shakespeare wrote, "The first thing we do, let's kill all the lawyers." However, "all the lawyers" have avoided being killed since that line was written. Why? From the largest corporate mergers to simple adoptions, and from public policy to the enactment of criminal laws, the need for lawyers is increasing because the law is a central part of our daily lives and the bedrock of a free society. Although occasionally the press might indicate otherwise, lawyers are members of a profession and they get respect, but is being a lawyer really like the popular portrayals on television shows such as Law and Order or in a John Grisham novel? This TIDE class will help you explore how one becomes a lawyer and what is it is like to be a lawyer. For example, what do lawyers do? Why do some lawyers go to court and others do not? Where do they work? What kind of skills do you need to have to be a successful lawyer? Do you want to take some interesting trips, such as sitting in on a trial, meeting a judge, or seeing a jail? If you want to find out answers to these questions and more, take the Law and Order TIDE class.
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TIDE 1000-01 New Orleans Cities of the Dead: Cemetery Architecture & Its Cultural Legacy
R 10:00-11:15am
Heather Knight.  Students will be introduced to the history and cultural folkways of New Orleans through the study of historic figures, cemetery architecture, monument construction and funerary symbolism reflected in stone and iron.  Why are above-ground tombs more prevalent in New Orleans?  What are the different tomb types and their architectural styles?  Why do families in Louisiana visit cemeteries on All Saints Day?  What symbolism does funerary art in stone and iron reveal?  This TIDE will provide five informative field sessions to local cemeteries and five class lectures. 
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TIDE 1002-01 The Edge of Medicine
M 5:00-6:15pm
Cedric Walker.  In TIDE-1002, we learn about new surgical procedures and devices that have translated Biomedical Engineering research into therapeutic improvements.  Robotic surgery, image guided surgery with intra-operative computed tomography, and minimally invasive repair of congenital heart defects are among the topics covered.  A surgeon will visit the class each week, and all students will observe different high-tech surgical procedures.  This course is especially recommended for students considering a major in Biomedical Engineering.

Students in TIDE-1002 must have a class schedule with at least one weekday morning per week that has no scheduled class before noon.  We’ll spend that morning in the operating room at a local hospital, leaving Tulane on the shuttle around 8:15AM and returning by 11:45AM.
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TIDE 1003-01 Happiness & Human Flourishing
W 2:00-3:15pm
Hans W. Gruenig.  Would you like to learn ways to increase enjoyment, engagement, and meaning during your college years and beyond? Would you like to learn how you can use personal character strengths to achieve academic success? In this course students will have the opportunity to learn about and experientially
explore life-enhancing practices and perspectives developed over millennia of human inquiry and validated within the exciting new field of positive psychology.

Topics will include positive emotions, character strengths (and their application in academia), meaning and engagement, exercise and meditation, nurturing social relationships, and more. This course will also expose students to local wellness resources at Tulane and New Orleans and will offer opportunities to explore the key areas of enjoyment, engagement, self-care, and meaningful contribution to others by attending a yoga class at a local studio, savoring New Orleans cuisine, exploring New Orleans architecture and history on a walking tour, and meaningfully contributing to the flourishing of New Orleans residents by engaging in service learning.
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TIDE 1005-01 The Greatest Free Show on Earth: Mardi Gras in New Orleans
W 2:30-3:45pm
Brian Brox.  Some observers have called New Orleans’ Carnival celebrations “The Greatest Free Show on Earth.”  But why does the community stage such a lengthy (and expensive!) spectacle?  This course attempts to answer the question of why by looking at Mardi Gras through historical, racial, cultural, artistic, and economic perspectives.  Through readings, class discussion, short films, and a couple of unique field trips, students will discover why Mardi Gras is so important to New Orleans.
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TIDE 1006-01 American Jews on Screen
R 3:30-4:45pm
Michael Cohen.  This course will analyze American Jewish culture through film and television.  The primary goal of this course will be to understand how Jewish women and men created a culture through film and television.  How does the portrayal of Jews on screen reflect their levels of comfort and integration in America?  How have American Jews portrayed themselves on screen, and in what ways is this an expression of their Jewish identity?  How has the portrayal of Jewish characters changed over time?  This TIDES course will use popular culture to delve deeper into issues of Jewish identity, acceptance, and cultural production.
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TIDE 1008-01 New Orleans: A Spirituality Survey
F 12:00-1:15pm
Rabbi Yonah Schiller.  This fun inviting course will bring us to meet the most colorful personalities that help to create our unique New Orleans landscape. We¹ll read texts and also interact with the people and religious leaders who bring these various spiritual beliefs to life—New Orleans style.  This journey will prove to be a unique glimpse into a side of New Orleans that is often only felt but never known. Through this course we will gain a better insight in to the various spiritual and mystical traditions and have the opportunity to discuss their applicability to our modern times.
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*TIDE 1010-01-06 Leadership, Politics, Power and Change
T 5:00-6:15pm (01-03); M 5:00-6:15pm (04-06)

James MacLaren, Ana Lopez, and Melanie Lee.  Are leaders born or bred? How do leaders and their leadership styles impact change? How does one develop the courage and wisdom to lead and promote change effectively? This TIDE provides an opportunity to examine the nature of leadership, its impact on the change process, and the underlying dynamics of power, politics, and conflict.

Over the course of the academic year, this TIDE focuses on developing an interdisciplinary understanding of the theories and practices of organizational and community leadership. As a TIDE member, you will actively study the theories that emerge from a variety of fields and reflect on their practical, political, and ethical assumptions as well as on their implications in a variety of settings.

Through readings, classroom discussions, interviews with local leaders, and a group initiative, you will gain a greater appreciation for the issues that affect leaders and the components of successful leadership. (Service Learning sections: TIDE-1890-11(01), TIDE-1890-12(02), TIDE-1890-14(04), TIDE-1890-15(05), & TIDE-1890-16(06))
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TIDE 1011-01 A Taste of Russia
R 5:15-6:30pm
Lidia Zhigunova.  The seminar will explore a wide range of elements of Russian culture, history and life, including food, music and visual arts. In an informal and relaxed atmosphere, the students will get a “taste” of a little bit of everything that Russia is famous for: from icon paintings and onion domes to borsch, Bellini and caviar; from the times of Ivan the Terrible to Putin’s Russia; from the famous nineteenth-century Russian-Ukrainian writer Nikolai Gogol to the wildly popular American-Ukrainian band Gogol Bordello. The seminar will closely examine the literary manifestations of food culture and the semiotics of eating in the nineteenth-century masterpieces of Russian literature. A variety of readings (mostly short stories and excerpts), a film screening, musical videos, a field trip to a gallery, and guest lectures will be part of the class. No knowledge of Russian is needed or required.
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TIDE 1012-01 Working for Change: New Orleans Leadership, Innovation & Public Policy
M 5:00-6:15pm
Matthew Segraves & Jonah Evans. This one-credit course focuses on the structure, functions and processes of developing and advancing public policy. It will delve deeper into how to become a leader in creating innovative policy that positively influences the community and how to successfully partner with the community and advocacy groups to implement solutions. We will learn from top local leaders who work to transform New Orleans and the entire nation though innovative policies and practices. We will explore how these leaders made it to where they are today, how they developed priorities based on the community’s needs, what important policy changes they have implemented and what changes they would like to make in the future.  The course includes a field trip to an Orleans Parish School Board (OPSB) meeting.
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TIDE 1020-01 Cities and the Urban Environment
W 5:30-6:45pm
Marilyn Feldmeier. Using the watershed book “The Death and Life of Great American Cities” by Jane Jacobs, we will explore and discuss its relevance to the city of New Orleans. We will also look directly at what is currently happening in the city of New Orleans via field studies, guest presentations and movies. Selected neighborhoods of New Orleans will be explored as vehicles for looking at the social, political, and economic life of cities.
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TIDE 1022-01 Computational Thinking for Work & Play (New for Fall 2014)
M 5:00pm-6:15pm
Carola Wenk & Jaelle Scheuerman.  Computing is constantly changing the way we work, play, create, research and connect.
Computational thinking skills are required in almost every field imaginable. Through a variety of guest lectures, hands on activities and field trips, this course will explore applications of computing across several disciplines. Students will also learn basic programming concepts through a creative computation project. This course is designed especially for students with no computing background.
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TIDE 1024-01 Invisible Cities
M 3:00-4:15pm
Andrew Stallings & John Craun.  “To submit fully to experience is an act of meticulous description.” ~Marcel Proust

In his touchstone fabulist novel, Invisible Cities, Italo Calvino imagines Marco Polo reporting to the mighty Kublai Khan. The Khan wants to know about the people under his rule, their customs, the things they’ve built, the things they dream. No ordinary account will do: the Khan wants a description that excites his imagination, that does not freeze the cities of the empire in time and space, but rather sets them spinning, multiplying, reverberating with strange life.

How do we describe the cities we live in? They're always there –available to our senses, under our feet, within reach of our hands –yet a complete and accurate representation is impossible: there’s too much to a city. We turn to invention, we begin to tell stories. In this course we will wander and wonder in the city at our own doorstep –New Orleans –and the cities of words it activates in our imaginations. We will investigate as well the ways in which those word-cities alter the city we see.
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TIDE 1030-01-06 The Music and Culture of New Orleans
W 4:30-5:45pm
Jessica Podewell, John Joyce & Joi Raines, Beverly Trask, Doug Walsh, and James Markway. "The Music and Culture of New Orleans" introduces the newcomer to New Orleans to the diversity of culture in the city and region. The 11-week course explores the music, literature, art, dance, architecture, and food that are unique to Southern Louisiana so that during your student years here you can fully enjoy them.
This TIDES course includes five general lectures by experts in the various aspects of the culture of New Orleans. Interspersed and alternating are six small sections where these experts converse directly with the freshmen, helping each individual explore the city. Students are directed to the most important music venues in the city, as well as to the best Creole and Cajun restaurants. In addition to the class meetings, each student is expected to join in at least two field trips to witness the culture first hand.
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TIDE 1034-01 New Orleans: The Lay of the Land
M 3:00-4:15pm
Corinne Van Dalen.  What does New Orleans have in common with New York, Rotterdam, Shanghai, and Jakarta? They are all coastal cities built on a delta. This course will explore the New Orleans landscape and development before and after levees, threats posed by sea level rise, storms, and coastal erosion, and efforts to address those threats. Students will hear from an archeologist about early settlements in New Orleans, tour a post-Katrina levee project designed to protect the City’s most vulnerable area, speak with a coastal restoration specialist about flood control, and visit a wetland restoration project designed and implements by community groups.
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TIDE 1035-01Introduction to Yoga
T 4:00-5:15pm
Michaela Cannon. Yoga is a practice that offers many tools for living skillfully. This class will arm freshman with tools to help ground, calm, and focus them. The best part is that these lessons come from sweating, moving, going upside down, chanting, breathing, talking, listening, and having fun. The Sanskrit work Kula means a community, and we will create a Kula in our class, as well as connect with the New Orleans yoga community. This course is for anyone who loves yoga, or is just interested in learning more about it.
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TIDE 1037-01 The Power of the Human Voice
R 9:30-10:45am
Sara Valentine.  Let’s make some noise! Come explore your vocal power, expressiveness and vitality. Why do poems and songs stir our emotions? What is the connection between listening and speaking? How do we confidently use our voices to effect change? Through a variety of fun and physically engaging exercises, students will discover the power of their unique voice. If you sing in the shower, you’re likely to enjoy this class and our examination of what it means to use our voices. No prior music or theatre experience is necessary.
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TIDE 1040-01 Religion, Media, Politics & Food: A Conversation on Contemporary Life (Formally: Our Religious Experiences)
R 4:30-5:45pm
Brian Horowitz. From the influence of the religious right to the impact of gay marriage on the social fabric, religion is moving front and center in our culture. In fact, religion is playing an increasingly vital role in the electoral politics, in culture wars, and in the media. In this class we will discuss the relationship of religion and politics, looking at the media, popular and high culture. This will be a student-centered class, so come ready to share your thoughts.
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TIDE 1042-01 Hidden In Plain View: Finding & Touring New Orleans’s Hidden Places & History
R 4:00-5:15pm
Terrence W. Fitzmorris. New Orleans lives in the past, but so much of its history lies hidden in plain view. This course will attempt to find an older New Orleans by walking its streets, visiting historic sites now obscured by modern highways, office buildings, manicured parks and parkways. The course will give each student an opportunity to become his or her own historian by researching the city’s old records kept safe in university, governmental, and private archives.

This course emphasizes reading, writing, discussion, and observation. These skills are the foundation for success at Tulane University. The principal “learning outcome” is the realization that academic investigation is fun.
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TIDE 1055-01 New Orleans & John Kennedy Toole’s “A Confederacy of Dunces”
W 3:30-4:45pm
Katharina Keppel. In this course we will explore John Kennedy Toole’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel A Confederacy of Dunces through the lens of its unique setting: New Orleans in the 1960s.The novel, which has been called “one of the funniest books ever written,” paints apicaresque portrait of the city and its characters. How are New Orleans and its historydepicted in the novel? What is a yat? And what does A Confederacy of Dunces tell usabout New Orleans today? We will address these and other questions through classdiscussions, readings, and a tour of key places in the book, including the PrytaniaTheater, the Ignatius O’Reilly statue on Canal Street, and –of course – a Lucky Dogsstand.
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TIDE 1060-01 New Orleans: Global at Local
W 2:00-3:15pm
Casey Love & Myke Yest.  Altman TIDES introduces students to the rich cultural fabric of New Orleans by examining past and present contributions made by peoples of different ethnicity and race. French, Spanish, German, Italian, Cajun, Creole, African, Latino, Jewish and Vietnamese cultures have all helped to shape New Orleans into the vibrant city that it is today. Specifically, each culture’s impact on New Orleans’ history, culture, politics, economy and business will be discussed.

These themes are at the core of the Altman Program’s mission to develop truly exceptional global citizens. Along the way, students will be exposed to some of the finest food, music, and attractions that make New Orleans one of the greatest cities in the world.
***FOR ALTMAN SCHOLARS ONLY!!!***
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TIDE 1065-01 Out Loud: Public Speaking In & About New Orleans (New for Fall 2014)
M 5:00pm-6:15pm
Gwendolyn Thompkins. There's no getting around public speaking -- whether in the classroom, or at a job interview, or at a podium accepting a major award. Now is the perfect time to learn how best to present your ideas out loud. Grammar and diction are important. But at the heart of all public speaking is storytelling. This class will focus on factual, entertaining and informative speech about New Orleans. Students will learn about and discuss the city's history, politics, environment and culture.
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TIDE 1070-01 Museums & Their Communities in the Crescent City
T 2:00-3:15pm

Holly Flora.  Get to know New Orleans through an exploration of its museums, from art museums to contemporary galleries to house museums and beyond.  Students will also gain hands-on museum experience by participating in a Service Learning via an educational outreach program at the New Orleans Museum of Art.  Ideal for students considering majors in art history or history.
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*TIDE 1090-01 Who Dat, Fan Up and Geaux: Sports & New Orleans
R 4:00-5:15pm
Desirée Anderson. Have you ever thought that you’d be excited to do “homework” if it focused solely on sports?  This course examines hot topics in sports such as expansion teams, drug testing, and stadium financing from an intellectual perspective using the city of New Orleans and its sports teams as a natural backdrop for these topics and others, while also offering students an opportunity to directly contribute to the sports community here in New Orleans.  (Service Learning section: TIDE-1899-11)
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TIDE 1111-01 Legends In Engineering and Science
T 12:30-1:45pm
James MacLaren.  This course will introduce students to several famous engineers, mathematicians, and scientists and some of the influential work they did. We will discuss not only the science but some of the personalities behind these minds. Over the course of this TIDES class, several revolutionary (in their time) discoveries and inventions will be studied.
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TIDE 1112-01 Contemporary Dance Appreciation
M 6:00-7:15pm
Michaela Cannon & Jeffrey Gunshol.  At the end of this eleven-week course students will join the small minority of people who can answer the question: What is contemporary dance?  Students will be introduced to the world of contemporary dance and the New Orleans dance community. The course will include a brief history of 20th Century dance, explorations of student’s own creative process through movement exercises, attendance of live performances, and talks by local dance artists. This course is for anyone who loves art and motion.
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TIDE 1113-01 Mindfulness: Understanding Self and Emotions
T 5:00-6:15pm
Ngawang Legshe.  Students will learn different traditional Tibetan mindfulness techniques, application of mindfulness practices in understanding destructive emotions and cultivating positive emotions.  Coping skills for depression, anxiety, stress, and insomnia will be described and practiced. Recent research on mindfulness practices in therapy, mental/physical health and spirituality will be studied.  Students will be required to participate in mindfulness practices: self-awareness, identification of destructive emotions, logical and mindful responses and compassionate living. Information will be based on recent scientific research and ancient Tibetan practices.
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TIDE 1114-01 Chinese Cinema
T 3:30-4:45pm
Kathleen Davis Are you beginning to study the Chinese language?  Want to learn more about Chinese culture?  Or do you just want to see some of the world’s great movies and talk about them with friends who share your interests?  See what mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong have to offer the film enthusiast.
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TIDE 1117-01 New Orleans: The Art of Masking Mayhem
W 4:00-5:15pm
Brittany Kennedy.  When Mardi Gras is over and the Hand Grenades have been drunk, what is it exactly that makes New Orleans a unique place to live and work? This TIDES course will examine the city of New Orleans as a performance of various histories and cultures over time and space. In other words, we will look at New Orleans texts to show how “culture” and “history” are not static, eternal forms, but moldable ones that change when cultures experience various kinds of political and social “mayhem.” In so doing, we will answers questions like, “Why is French Quarter architecture actually Spanish?”; “Why in the late nineteenth century, did New Orleans boast that largest Italian-American population in the U.S.?; and “Why do people ‘Second Line?’” In short, the idea of what is “French” (or any other cultural community) has changed according to historical circumstance and cultural perspective, and the means by which such cultures change says a lot about who we are as a city and a nation.
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TIDE 1180-01 The Management & Prevention Of Epidemic Disease
W 1:30-2:45pm
Joseph Contiguglia.  “WHEN GLOBAL IS LOCAL: THE NATURE, IMPACT, MANAGEMENT & PREVENTION OF EPIDEMIC DISEASE” examines disease as a social event in an evolving global community. Population growth, societal aging, urbanization, rapid transportation, economic interdependence and emerging infectious disease have expanded community vulnerability far beyond what could have been imagined only a few generations ago. Through discussion of specific infectious and non-infectious diseases, students will be exposed to real world examples how public health gets into action.  Group case studies and the table top exercise will provide students hands-on opportunities to serve as “disease detectives.”
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TIDE 1205-01 Jambalaya, Crawfish Pie, Filé Gumbo: Reading & Learning From Family, Local, and National Cookbooks
(New for Fall 2014)
M 12:30-1:45pm
Susan Tucker.  New Orleans’ cuisine is unique.  This course provides an opportunity to know this distinctive quality through the reading of cookbooks and culinary history, in conversations with local food writers, and via an exploration of self in relation to dinner favorites. We will create an intersection of your own food habits with New Orleans, and explore what you learn about food can inform your other scholarly endeavors.
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TIDE 1210-01 Art Meets Physics
T 5:00-6:15pm
Jerry Shakov.  Art and science: how much do they have in common? Maybe more than most people think. In both the arts and the sciences there’s the need for inspiration and hard work, the willingness to experiment, and the conviction that you are creating work that says something meaningful about the world or nature.
In this course we will discuss the mutual influence of arts and sciences, particularly physics, that goes well beyond the use of science as a raw material by artists, using examples from different art forms and historic periods.
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TIDE 1215-01 The Physics of Baseball
T 5:00-6:15pm
Timothy Schuler.  From the swooping bend of the pitched curveball to the nearly instantaneous collision between the ball and bat, baseball provides many examples of phenomena which can be colorfully described through basic examples in classical physics. Mathematics also plays a key role in baseball, through describing player abilities via statistics or the probability found in “playing the odds” by both players and coaches. This course will discuss the physics and mathematics behind the “Great American Pastime”, providing insight into the application of basic scientific concepts to everyday events through the frame of baseball.
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TIDE 1220-01 New Orleans & Hurricanes: Past, Present and Future
W 3:00-4:15pm
Stephen Nelson This course will explore the events leading up to Hurricane Katrina, from a geological and historical perspective and explore why New Orleans is at risk from future hurricanes and the steps being taken to protect the city from future events.   Although sociological, cultural, and political aspects of the response to the Katrina disaster and recovery will touched upon, the main emphasis will be placed on historic, scientific and engineering aspects of Katrina and the systems designed to protect the city form hurricanes.  Course material can be found at http://www.tulane.edu/~sanelson/New_Orleans_and_Hurricanes
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TIDE 1230-01 Latin American Infusion
T 11:00am-12:15pm

James Huck. The Maya, La Raza, Che Guevara, tequila, samba, divas, jungles, narcos, carnival, santos, and much more. Delve deeper into Latin American, Caribbean, and Latino popular culture using the resources and opportunities provided by Tulane and New Orleans! Drawing from literature, local cultural events, faculty, and special guests, we will sample and mix these and other modern themes to gain a greater appreciation for and understanding of the cultural stereotypes and expressions of the region within the context of historical, societal, and political frameworks. Students will have the opportunity to attend films, readings, art exhibitions, musical events, and performances by Latin Americans, and then to discuss their meanings with important Latin Americanists at Tulane and in New Orleans.
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TIDE 1240-01 Sex, Drugs, Rock and Roll & Disease
M 6:00-7:15pm

Reginald Parquet. Over the course of the next year students will develop an understanding of why young adults engage in high-risk health behaviors. During the first semester attention will focus on the social processes thought to underlie young adults' uptake of behavior patterns which expose them to unnecessary health risks. Among the wide range of high risk behaviors to be covered over the course of the year will be drinking, drugging, smoking, eating, speeding, unsafe sex, and other risky choices. Participants will develop an understanding of how one's family, friends and peers come to shape high-risk health behavior patterns. New Orleans provides an excellent vantage point from which to scientifically explore a culture in which exhibiting high risk health behavior patterns is almost normative. Students will work up epidemiological comparisons between their hometowns and New Orleans based on a wide range of available Internet databases. Students do no direct observations or participation in any high-risk behavior patterns as part of the course.
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TIDE 1250-01 Visual Arts of New Orleans
T 5:00-6:15pm

Laura Richens. This TIDES class has been put together by a team of university art professionals with the intention of introducing students to the breadth of the visual arts scene in contemporary New Orleans. The course will include field trips to and visits from artists, curators, critics, collectors, private gallery owners, and public museum professionals offering a behind-the-scenes look at the vibrant cultural life of the city. Ideally students will come away from the class with an appreciation of the richness of the visual arts in New Orleans, the ability to discuss and write about the visual arts, and some insights into the nuts-and-bolts activities of the individuals and institutions the define the visual arts in New Orleans.
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TIDE 1305-01 Different Pictures of New Orleans: From Storyville to the Blue Dog
T 4:00-5:15pm
Alexandra Reuber. What do we associate with New Orleans? The most common answers are, great restaurants, Mardi Gras, Jazz Fest, French Quarter Festival, Voodoo, Ghosts, the Blue Dog, and of course, Hurricane Katrina and the Saints. As you can see, New Orleans has many different faces, facets, and components that all lead up to the unique culture of this great southern city. Are you ready to explore and to learn about “The Different Pictures of New Orleans,” from the city’s founding in 1817 to its present day?
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TIDE 1340-01 Making a Difference with Children and Adolescents
W 5:00-6:15pm
Jerome White & Carol Whelan Do you like working with children and adolescents but are not sure how this might transfer into career opportunities? Are you interested in the arts, science or mathematics? Are you interested in making a difference in the lives of children? This TIDE class provides opportunities to explore many avenues of work with K-12 students and to meet with experts from a variety of fields including education, social work, and criminal justice.
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*TIDE 1370-01 & 02 Adventure, Discipline, Obsession:  A Running Conversation
T 5:00-6:15pm (01) & F 8:00-9:15am (02)
Samuel Landry. Like to have class outside? Want to get off campus and see the city? Like to learn in unconventional ways? And, oh yes, do you run? Then run with us in the early evening while we discuss a variety of aspects of life in motion, from the mythical (or not) "runner's high" to running as a metaphor for life. (Why did Forrest Gump run? Why did he stop running?) All classes will start off campus, in locations such as Audubon Park, City Park (end of the streetcar line), and the French Quarter (end of the streetcar line in the other direction), and end with refueling (i.e., a meal, procured from Whole Foods Grocery).  (Service Learning section: TIDE-1893-11 for section -01 and 1893-12 for section -02)
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TIDE 1390-01  Silver Screen Shakespeare
W 9:30-10:45am
Victor Holtcamp. “Like movies? Romance? Adventure? Death? Comedy? True Love? You’ve come to the right place! This course offers an introduction to Shakespeare’s plays as they have been adapted for the screen. Students will learn about Shakespeare’s life and work, as well as watching a selection of film versions of some of his most famous plays. Brush up your Shakespeare! Start quoting him now!”
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*TIDE 1395-01 Catholic New Orleans (New for Fall 2014)
W 4:00-5:15pm
James Huck. New Orleans has a rich Catholic tradition that has its own unique flavor among the larger global Catholic community. The purpose of this course is to explore this rich tradition and to delve more deeply into the socio-cultural nuances of Catholic life in this city that was founded largely by Catholic missionaries and Catholic French/Spanish colonial empires. Students should know that the course is not a theology course, and the purpose is neither to proselytize nor to evangelize. It is really a course about the history, society, and culture of New Orleans as viewed through its Catholic foundations, such as they are.

The course will also be a mandatory Service-Learning course with a community partnership collaboration with the Good Shepherd School, founded by the Jesuits and whose mission is “to help low-income, urban youth in order to realize their fullest potential as productive members of society by providing them with an extended-day, year-round, quality education, integrated with personal, moral and spiritual development, and continued guidance during the students’ further education.” (http://www.thegoodshepherdschool.org) (Service Learning section: TIDE-1891-11)
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TIDE 1400-01 Being an Advocate for Women
W 4:00-5:15pm
Catherine Hancock.  The premise of this course is that anyone can "act like a lawyer" – and that no knowledge of law is required to do so. Every day may bring an opportunity to act as an advocate for another person who needs help, and we can think of "lawyering" activities as "actions taken by advocates for others." This course will focus on the needs of women in the legal system, especially abused women, as the subject for class discussions about the ways in which lawyers and non-lawyers alike can become agents of social change while serving as advocates for others.

This TIDES course will be valuable for students who are interested in the interdisciplinary connections among the fields of psychology, sociology, gender studies, civil rights history, social work, feminist theory, law, and the art of advocacy.
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TIDE 1430-01 Writing in New Orleans
W 5:00-6:15pm
Beau Boudreaux.  A student adopts and inhabits a new city, becoming native.  Keep a journal of New Orleans.  Write it down!  Take moments, ideas to reflect the experience among peers living in the Crescent City.  Write letters, poems, and lyrics, discussed during workshops in class and on excursions in the city.  Become thoughtful...listen, read, write, converse through language. A journal may recollect moments in tranquility (Wordsworth) or may take the form of day-to-day experience (Bosworth).  During particular classes the student will be asked to write while on a streetcar, in Audubon Park, and on the levee by the Mississippi river.  Students will keep a journal, participate in a writer’s workshop, give a class presentation, and write a research paper.  Participation is a must.  There are no examinations. 
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TIDE 1490-01 Religion in a Free Society
W 2:00-3:15pm
Bruce Brower.  In the last few years, a Danish cartoon of Mohammed led to Islamic riots, Christian conservatives called for prayers and crosses in public buildings, national leaders and a major movie actor made anti-Semitic remarks, an American city council permitted Orthodox Jews to erect a religious boundary, and Islamic girls have been prevented from wearing headscarves to school in France. 

This course considers these issues and more by examining the nature of religious freedom and the role religion should play in free democratic societies.  To ensure our discussion makes contact with the real world, we will meet with local representatives from several religions.
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*TIDE 1500-01 Irish in New Orleans
T 3:30-4:45pm
Laura Kelley.  The Irish Channel, Parasol’s Restaurant and Bar, New Basin Canal, the Downtown Irish Club and St. Patrick’s Cathedral- Welcome to Irish New Orleans!   All of these Irish institutions shaped New Orleans.  Learn about and experience first-hand the tremendous impact of the Irish in New Orleans while also considering how life was different for these Irish who came south.  Did living in a predominantly Catholic port city appeal to these newly arrived immigrants?   Overcoming hunger, disease, economic hardship, and discrimination, the Irish in New Orleans are a compelling testimony to the limitless possibilities of the American dream. (Service Learning section: TIDE-1895-11)
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TIDE 1510-01 Mathematics in the Media
W 5:30-6:45pm

Michelle Lacey. The public's perception of mathematicians and mathematical concepts is shaped by the ways in which they are presented in the news and entertainment media. The portrayal of mathematics in the media raises many questions: What level of mathematical detail is deemed acceptable for the general public? What makes mathematics newsworthy? How are mathematicians portrayed in films, novels, and television programs?

In this interdisciplinary course, students will explore the techniques used by reporters, writers, and filmmakers to illuminate abstract ideas for a general audience while gaining a deeper understanding of the underlying mathematical theory. Topics will include mathematical newsworthiness, media stereotypes of mathematicians, and the entertainment value of mathematical ideas as well as the various ways in which the news and entertainment media presents mathematical ideas to general audiences through the study of newspaper and journal articles, novels, television programs, and films. This TIDE is appropriate for students interested in mathematics, communications, or literature.
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TIDE 1520-01 Medieval New Orleans
M 3:00-4:15pm

Michael Kuczynski. This TIDES Seminar will explore, largely by way of class trips around campus and the city and discussions based on selected readings, the influence and ongoing presence of medieval material culture and medieval ideas and attitudes in New Orleans (and, to some extent, in Southern culture in general). We'll be looking at—and handling—real medieval manuscripts housed in the Rare Books Room, Jones Hall, discussing medieval architectural styles revived in Tulane buildings, experiencing medieval music by New Orleans' Musica de Camera in the setting of faux medieval chapel, pilgrimaging around the city in search of actual relics (the bones of saints), and delving into medieval influences on pre-Lenten festivals such as Mardi Gras and on such distinctively New Orleanian foodstuffs as gumbo and "turduckin."
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TIDE 1530-01 Folk Traditions of New Orleans
T 5:00-6:15pm
Teresa Parker Farris.  The Louisiana Folklife Program defines folk traditions as those behaviors that are “currently practiced and passed along by word of mouth, imitation, and observation over time and space within groups, such as family, ethnic, social class, regional, and others.”  Through this course, students will gain an appreciation for New Orleans’ cultural diversity by examining the aesthetics, meaning and values inherent in folk traditions.  We will discuss the nature of folk traditions and explore the differences between folk, popular, and elite cultural expressions.  As the study of folklife draws from both the humanities and social sciences, students will gain methodologies that may be applied to other fields such as English, anthropology, American studies, art history, and musicology.
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TIDE 1570-01 Going Green in New Orleans
T 12:00-1:15pm
Linda Baynham.  Why is Brad Pitt on the news in New Orleans so much?  Because he’s “Going Green in New Orleans!”  Find out why solar is sexy, and what other resources are realistically and cost-effectively available in the U.S. and New Orleans to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve the environment.  This class will cover renewable energy resources for electricity production across the U.S. (wind, solar, hydroelectricity), with special emphasis on New Orleans resources (solar).  Construction of green homes will also be included in the class, with field trips to solar installations and green building resources in New Orleans.  The Brad Pitt “Design Competition” LEED certified home being built in the devastated 9th ward will be included in the tour, so students will have an opportunity to see an area affected by Katrina and the rebuilding efforts that are helping it to “go green.”
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TIDE 1590-01 Introduction to Research: What Your Professors Are Doing When They Are Not In Class
M 4:30-5:45pm
Gary Talarchek. This class is centered on the research enterprise. What is it? How can you get involved? Why should you get involved at this stage of your academic career?  Research varies tremendously by discipline. In fact, some disciplines may not even call it research; they will call it scholarship. We will consider the search for new knowledge in diverse disciplines. You will meet a variety of Tulane researchers in their labs and centers, learn about their research through reading and discussion, and learn what it is like to conduct research.  This class will serve as an excellent introduction for students who wish to pursue a career in research, medicine, public service or teaching.
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TIDE 1600-01 & 02 Introduction to Clinical Medicine
W 6:00-7:15pm
Neel & Jagan Gupta.  Are you interested in the field of medicine? Are you fed up with the post-Katrina healthcare model? Do you want to help save our health care system? Are you interested in having a fun and vibrant seminar under the tutelage of a dynamic group of teachers? Pro-life vs. Pro-choice? – Then this seminar is for you. Be adventurous and sign up. Come voice your opinions and be heard. 
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TIDE 1610-01 Understanding the Persistence of Social Problems in America
M 11:00am-12:15pm
Fred Buttell.Why have we spent 3 trillion dollars on poverty programs in the United States and yet we still have poverty? The purpose of this class is to help students understand that social problems like poverty and drug use tend to co-exist in the same families. Consequently, simple solutions like giving money to poor people are inadequate and have failed as social programs because they misunderstand the problem. This course will examine the reality of working with poor people in the United States.
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TIDE 1665-01 Gender & Sexuality in New Orleans History
M 5:15-6:30pm
Megan Karbley.  Why is New Orleans so well known for “letting the good times roll?” How did New Orleans become “the oldest center for gay and lesbian life in the south?” In this TIDES seminar we will use documentaries, scholarly research, oral histories, visual art, literature, and a walking tour to gain insight into New Orleans’ unique history of gender and sexuality. We will examine the ways in which gender and sexuality in the city have been fundamentally reorganized since the colonial period and consider the factors that account for those changes. All of our inquiries will attend to the ways in which race, class, religion, the economy, the state, geography, and even Hurricanes have informed the distinct gender and sexual discourses that developed during particular times. In 2013, we will focus in particular on the history of LGBTIQA communities in New Orleans.
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TIDE 1680-01 The Role of the Commissioner in Professional Sports
W 5:00-6:15pm

Gabe Feldman. This course will explore the authority of commissioners in the major professional sports leagues to discipline players, owners, coaches, and others for conduct deemed injurious to the interests of the league or the sport. Students will explore the origin and evolution of the office of the commissioner, tracing the development of the position from Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis to Bud Selig, Paul Tagliabue, and David Stern. Students will focus on and discuss actions taken by commissioners in specific cases involving gambling, performance enhancing and recreational drug use, brawling during games, mistreating game officials and opposing players, and other types of misconduct both on and off the playing field. Students will be asked to think critically about the scope of the commissioner's power to act in these situations and the propriety of the actions taken by the commissioner. The course will also analyze the commissioner's regulatory authority to take action "in the best interests of the game," and will look at notable cases where this authority was challenged by players and owners.
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TIDE 1690-01 Community Engagement in Urban Design
T 3:30-4:45pm
Grover Mouton & Nick Jenisch.  Do you ever wonder what forces shape the built world around you?  Urban Design is a dynamic field of study that engages a number of intellectual subjects, including city & building design, politics, policy, social engagement, and community building.  We will examine local and regional projects such as the Dew Drop Jazz Hall in Mandeville, LA and the Forks of the Road Slave Market Site in Natchez, MS, engaging with the community and local government officials to see what it takes to preserve historic buildings and develop new ones to tell stories from the past.  We will also look at exploding development in China and compare the vastly different scales of development through the local and international work of the Tulane Regional Urban Design Center. 
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TIDE 1700-01 Cocktails, Cayenne & Creoles: The Myths & Realities of New Orleans Food & Drink
R 3:30-4:45pm
Amy George-Hirons.  New Orleans is a tourist town, and food and drink are two of the ways the city markets itself to the world.  What effect do celebrity and media have on the creation of a local identity?  What does that tell us about how the media creates the reality of a place for outsiders?  Is the early history of sophisticated drinking responsible for the nightly daiquiri-fueled bacchanal on Bourbon Street?  How did the city of New Orleans become synonymous with Cajun food?  How did gumbo earn a place on every table in the city, from the humblest lunch joint to the most elegant restaurant?  In this course, we explore the myths and realities of three iconic elements of the New Orleans marketing machine: cocktails, Cajun cuisine and gumbo.
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TIDE 1710-01 The Tudors: Films, Fiction, History  (Formally: Tudors in Novels & Film)
T 6:00-7:15pm
Margaret Keenan. Are you a fan of  the Tudors on Showtime and want to know more?  Did you devour Philippa Gregory’s Tudor novels in one sitting, but wonder what really happened? Are you a Black Adder or Monty Python fan?  Would you like discuss sixteenth century sex, religion, and politics over proper English tea at Windsor Court?  If you can answer yes to any of these questions, then “Tudors in Novels and Film” is for you. 

In this seminar,  you will  examine popular depictions of the Henry VIII, Anne Boleyn, Mary Tudor, and Elizabeth I, access their historical accuracy, and analyze such depictions in light of both contemporary and present-day attitudes towards Catholicism and Protestantism, notions of female sexuality, and the role of gender in politics. 
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TIDE 1720-01 The Military in American Society
W 11:00am-12:15pm
Paul Kane & Chris Harbiston.  We will explore the role of the United States military in the society it serves.  Students will trace the evolution of the military, learn the jobs of each branch in the international strategic picture, and debate the executive use of military power in current and future policy.  We will also discover the life of an individual service member; how we are trained; how we work; how we deploy overseas; and what we think about working for the President.
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*TIDE 1740-01 Citizenship & Healthy Communities
R 5:00-6:15pm
Christopher Lane What does citizenship mean to you?  Is it something more than the power to vote?  How can being a good citizen help keep our communities healthy? Every community is unique – what does that mean in New Orleans?  How have our notions of citizenship evolved as a country?  Can you become a citizen of New Orleans?  We’ll examine these questions while getting to know a local neighborhood, where we’ll be engaged in a service project working with a community group as well as doing a Habitat for Humanity build.  (Service Learning section: TIDE-1898-11)
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TIDE-1742-01 Shakespeare in New Orleans (New for Fall 2014)
R 7:00-8:15pm
Scott Oldenburg & Rick Godden.  Mardi Gras floats, blues songs, Romeo-catchers, Falstaff brewery . . . . In this course we will explore the traces of Shakespeare in New Orleans through reading and performing.

Activities include attending the performance of the Shakespeare Festival’s fall remount of one of its plays (this year, A Midsummer Night’s Dream), watching the film Zombie Hamlet (set in Louisiana), and beguiling ourselves into learning something while having a good time.
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TIDE 1760-01 Narratives of New Orleans: A Storytelling Project
T 3:00-4:15pm
Mike Griffith
.  Participants in this TIDES course will be introduced to the principles of online narrative and storytelling in the context of the exploration of New Orleans culture.  Throughout the course we will be interested in how and why the stories that we hear are preserved and retold and what aspects of narration make for compelling tales.  This course will culminate in the creation of an individual digital stories detailing each student’s ideas about his or her relation to the ongoing narrative of New Orleans.
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TIDE 1765-01 TV, MD: Are We Ever Ready for Prime Time?
M 6:00-7:15pm
Ilana S. Fortgang, MD. What is your favorite show on TV?   If it is set anywhere near a hospital and the word stat is uttered, then this course is for you.  TV, MD will examine the depiction of the physician, the cultural context for this and its relationship to reality.  Each week we will watch an episode of 1 of 6 prime time TV shows, aired from 1970 to the present, and contrast this with the way doctors are represented in literature.   As well there will be the opportunity to shadow real doctors downtown at Tulane and relate these experiences to the fictional representations.
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TIDE 1790-01 An Introduction to Akira Kurosawa Cinema
W 11:00am-12:15pm
Antony Sandoval.  The “An Introduction to Akira Kurosawa Cinema” course will be an investigation of the cinema of fame Japanese Movie Director Akira Kursoawa via research on his work and his life. It will be achieved by watching some of his movies reading about his life and looking at his impact on the world.
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*TIDE 1810-01 Non-Profit Organizations & Community Engagement in New Orleans
W 4:00-5:15pm
Dennis Kehoe.  In this course, we will come to a better understanding of the recovery from Hurricane Katrina by examining the role that non-profit organizations have played in such efforts as building houses, providing health care, and supporting education. We will also examine the interactions of non-profits and state and local governments. (Service Learning section: TIDE-1892-11)
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TIDE 1840-01 Object-Oriented Programming Through Video Games
T 5:00-6:15pm
Harry Howard.  Today’s students have grown up in a multimedia world – and to motivate them, instructors must relate students’ classroom experience to that world. Alice is a teaching tool for such students. It uses 3D graphics and a drag-and-drop interface to teach introductory object-oriented computer programming with a more engaging, less frustrating experience. It makes it easy to create an animation for telling a story, playing an interactive game, or a video to share on the web.
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TIDE 1850-01 The History of Dreams & Dreaming: From the Ancients to Modern Science
M 12:00-1:15pm
Thomas Hebert.  Throughout history humans have searched for the meaning of dreams.  In this course students get to learn about the history of dream interpretation from the time of the ancients to what current research tells us about dreams.  Discussion topics include sleep temples, psychological interpretations of dreams, biological basis of dreaming, daydreaming, and sex differences in dreams.  Students maintain a dream log in which they note the incidence of themes that have been historically associated with dreaming.
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TIDE 1870-01 World Dance
W 2:00-3:15pm
John Allen.  This course will expose the student to various folk dance forms throughout the world both in theory and in practice, though mostly in practice. It will be designed to heighten the students’ awareness and appreciation of the many different cultures of the world, through the experience of those cultures’ dances.
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TIDE 1880-01 Martial Arts for the Performing Arts
T 1:00-2:15pm
Kyriakos Papadopoulos & Antony Sandoval.  Successful fight scenes have always played a role in many theater, film, and dance performances.  Through this course Tulane students will be exposed to martial-art techniques that can be used for staging combat.  They will practice drills, read selected passages and watch film clips that will aid them to stage a small fight performance along with their classmates by the end of the semester.
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TIDE 1910-01 Soviet Comedy Movies of the 1960s and 1970s
T 5:00-6:15pm
Alexandra Raskina.  Can humor be revolutionary? Can satire bring down a dictatorship? This course looks at the role of satiric films in bringing about the collapse of the Soviet Union. We’ll watch movies, talk big, and have fun. Maybe some food, too.
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TIDE 1950-01 ¡Salsa!
R 3:00-4:15pm
Javier Olondo.  Salsa! is an in depth look at the evolution of Cuban music as it travels between Cuba, Cali, Colombia, Puerto Rico, the United States and Japan. Through readings, discussions, class presentations and short writing assignments, students will have the opportunity to explore the historical development and change that have led to the creation of salsa music.  Students will also focus on some key examples of salsa lyrics in an attempt to look at the thematic breadth of the genre.  Finally, a preeminent dance music, students will have the opportunity to take four dance workshops designed to engage their bodies as well as their minds.
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TIDE 1955-01 Life & Death Decisions  (New for Fall 2014)
R 6:15-7:30pm
Yehuda Halper.  How we make tough medical decisions about life and death reflects how we value life and what we consider to be a life worth living. This seminar will explore the meaning of life by asking difficult questions about death and dying. Each week we will discuss a specific medical issue, including abortion, disaster relief (e.g., in Katrina), and euthanasia, focusing on the ethical meaning and implications of human decisions. Invited speakers, including doctors, chaplains, and philosophers, will provide a broad range of perspectives on the issues.
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TIDE 1970-01 Simple, Effective, Clear and Inspired: Songwriting for an Audience
T 5:00-6:15pm
Mark Carson.  Are you a songwriter, or someone who is interested in songwriting?  In this course students will read articles on songwriting by the songwriters themselves, listen to and analyze successful songs, use techniques that the pros use, and collaborate with each other.  By the end of the course students will have written an original song and had it critiqued by the other students.  Musical ability will be welcome, but will not be required.        
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Robert C. Cudd Hall 201 • Tulane University • New Orleans, LA 70118 • (504) 865-5678 • tides@tulane.edu