shadow_tr
Discovery - the reward of research.

Researchers at Tulane University benefit from work conducted in multiple disciplines on three campuses. It's one of the reasons why sponsored research awards in 2010 reached the highest level in the history of Tulane University, exceeding $172 million.

Research Projects
thumbnail
Tulane biologist discovers new rare flowering plant in the Grand Canyon
A research team lead by Tulane University biologist John J. Schenk has discovered a previously unknown flowering plant in a remote corner of the Grand Canyon.
Full Story...
thumbnail
Professors traverse the Panama Canal Zone's history
Tulane University professors Carol McMichael Reese and Thomas F. Reese traveled to Panama in August to open an exhibition based on their recently published book, The Panama Canal and Its Architectural Legacy (1905-1920). The book studies the architectural and urban design achievements of the Panama Canal Zone's creators.
Full Story...
thumbnail
Archaeologist makes 'once in a lifetime' discovery
A team of archaeologists led by an adjunct faculty member in the Tulane University Department of Anthropology made a huge find when it unearthed a well-preserved Mayan frieze dating back to 600 A.D. in the Mayan city of Holmul, a site in northern Guatemala.
Full Story...
thumbnail
Vitamins may ease diabetes symptoms—Tulane study
Vitamin therapy is a promising avenue to improving symptoms of pain, tingling and numbness in hands and feet typical of diabetic neuropathy, a study by Tulane University researchers concluded.
Full Story...
thumbnail
Research team delves into a new target for treating cancer
Lu and his team are investigating the cellular protein p53, which in a normal, healthy person plays a role in the suppression of tumor growth. The genetic makeup of p53 is mutated in greater than 50 percent of all human cancers, while its activity level is often markedly reduced in the remaining half.
Full Story...
poison dart frog
Frogs’ bright colors cue scientists to diversity
Tiny poison dart frogs living wild in Panama may provide clues about relatively rapid biodiversification, says Tulane University evolutionary biologist Corinne “Cori” Richards-Zawacki. Her team of students has spent most of the summer at two field sites on an archipelago studying natural selection.
Full Story...
Louisiana coast
Gulf Coast sea level rise in overdrive, study says
The rate of sea level rise along the U.S. Gulf Coast has increased dramatically this past century compared to that of the preindustrial millennium (600-1600 A.D.). This sobering news for residents from the Florida panhandle to east Texas is just one part of the findings by Tulane University researchers in a study published March 30 in the journal Earth and Planetary Science Letters.
Full Story...
Maureen Lichtveld
Oil Spill Puts Women’s Health in Peril?
Dr. Maureen Lichtveld of the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine will lead a five-year study to explore the potential health impacts of the Deepwater Horizon disaster on pregnant women and women of reproductive age living in Louisiana’s coastal parishes. The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences has awarded a $6.5 million grant for the study.
Full Story...
Adeline Masquelier
Women of Islam in a West African Town
When Adeline Masquelier, a Tulane professor of anthropology, set out to document changes in Muslim culture in Africa, she did not anticipate the bond she’d forge with the women of Niger. Since 1988 she’s made several treks to Dogondoutchi, Niger, and has written about those experiences in her award-winning book Women and Islamic Revival in a West African Town.
Full Story...
Oliver Fund Scholar Probes Ancient Sea-Level Rise
Oliver Fund Scholar Probes Ancient Sea-Level Rise
Did the melting of ancient ice sheets after the last Ice Age cause sudden sea-level rises? What can be learned from this distant history that could send cautionary messages to modern populations living at the ocean’s edge? Tulane researcher Torbjörn Törnqvist is drilling into coastal soils in search of answers.
Full Story...
Katrina mold
More Mold Allergies After Katrina?
Researchers at the Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine have determined that there is no excess risk of adverse respiratory health problems for residents living in post-Katrina New Orleans.
Full Story...
Preston Marx
Roots of AIDS Virus May Be Ancient
The HIV-like virus that infects monkeys is thousands of years older than previously thought, according to a new study led by researchers from Tulane University. Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), which is the ancestor to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), is between 32,000 and 75,000 years old and may even be more than a million years old, according to genetic analysis of SIV strains found in monkeys on Bioko, an island off the coast of Africa.
Full Story...
Howard Mielke
Katrina Flood — A Silver Lining?
Tulane University researcher Howard Mielke and his colleagues have observed an unforeseen positive result of flooding in New Orleans following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita — post-flood decreases in lead contamination in some neighborhoods and corresponding decreases in blood lead levels in young children.
Full Story...
Robert Garry and James Robinson
Hope for Hemorrhagic Fevers
The National Institute of Allergies and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded a five-year contract totaling more than $15 million to Tulane University for its ongoing efforts to treat and prevent Lassa fever, an often deadly viral disease that threatens hundreds of thousands of people annually in West Africa and is classified as a potential bioterrorism threat.
Full Story...
Brad Rosenheim
Currents Tell Climate-change Story
Brad Rosenheim, assistant professor of earth and environmental sciences at Tulane, is pursuing two studies funded by the National Science Foundation using advanced carbon-dating techniques. One study uses radiocarbon records stored in corals and sponges from several sites in the tropical North Atlantic to look backward at how ocean currents have changed over time.
Full Story...
Zhiqiang Mao
New Materials for Better Defense
Zhiqiang Mao, a physics professor in the Tulane School of Science and Engineering, has received a $450,000 grant from the U. S. Department of Defense meant to enhance research and engineering capabilities in disciplines critical to national security.
Full Story...
Muneoka Leads Limb Regeneration Research
Muneoka Leads Limb Regeneration Research
Could the salamander's natural ability to grow back severed appendages lead to a scientific breakthrough for humans who have lost limbs? With the help of a $6.25 million U.S. Department of Defense grant, Tulane University professor Ken Muneoka, who holds the John L. and Mary Wright Ebaugh Chair in Science and Engineering, will lead a team of researchers from the University of California–Irvine and the University of Kentucky to identify the genes that trigger regeneration in the axolotl, a Mexican salamander.
Full Story...
Researchers Probe Genetic Links to Obesity
Researchers Probe Genetic Links to Obesity
Obesity is a serious health risk, increasing the chances of millions for developing diabetes, cardiovascular disease or cancer. Tulane University researchers are engaged in a study focusing on why some people become obese and others do not. Full Story...
Katrina Heart Attacks thumbnail
Post-Katrina Stress, Heart Problems Linked
Chronic stress following Hurricane Katrina contributed to a three-fold increase in heart attacks in New Orleans more than two years after levee breaches flooded most of the city, according to researchers at Tulane University School of Medicine. Full Story...
Tidal Marsh Reveals Microscopic Insights
Tidal Marsh Reveals Microscopic Insights
For Mark Fox, a graduate student in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Tulane, the impact of severe storms on wetland diversity must be studied at the microscopic level. Full Story...
Study of Risk Factors for Kidney Disease Continues
The Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study holds hope for prevention and treatment of chronic kidney disease, which afflicts 26.3 million patients in this country. Full Story...
Katrina Severely Damaged Coastal Forests
Losses inflicted by Hurricane Katrina on Gulf Coast forest trees are enough to cancel out a year's worth of new tree biomass (trunks, branches and foliage) growth in other parts of the country. Full Story...
Engineering Professor Wins Prestigious Early Career Award
Hank Ashbaugh is working hard to unravel the mystery of unstructured proteins in the human genome, and he's on a roll. Full Story...

Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 504-865-5000 website@tulane.edu