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Faculty

Cherif Boudaba

Cherif BoudabaProfessor of Practice, Ph.D., University of Bordeaux, France, 2001. Bursting activity and its synchronization in the hypothalamic magnocellular neurons. Study focuses on neuronal circuits ending on these neurons that may control their electrical pattern and therefore their hormonal release. Intracellular patch-clamp recordings in brain slice preparation and immunocytochemical techniques are used. Dr. Boudaba teaches CELL 1030, Heredity and Society, CELL 1035, Heredity and Society Laboratory, CELL 2115, General Biology Laboratory, and CELL 4110/6110, Cells and Tissues.

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YiPing Chen

YiPing ChenChair in Cell and Molecular Biology and Professor, Yahoo! Founder Chair in Science and Engineering, Recipient, Provost’s Award for Excellence in Research and Scholarship, 2005, Ph.D., University of Iowa, 1993. Molecular mechanisms and genetic control of vertebrate organogenesis. We are particularly interested in the roles of growth factors and transcription factors in craniofacial and cardiac development and congenital defects. We use a combination of in vivo genetic modifications and in vitro experimental approaches to address fundamental questions in the development of tooth, palate and heart. Dr. Chen teaches CELL 4160/6160, Developmental Biology, CELL 4780/6780, Developmental Genetics.

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James Cronin

James CroninProfessor of Practice, Ph.D., Tulane University, 1990.  Levy Professor for Integrated Discover and Community Engagement. Research interests include the neurophysiology of epilepsy, and developing viral-vector based techniques for gene transfer to the nervous system. Dr. Cronin teaches CELL 3210/6210, Cellular Physiology, CELL 6360, Topics in Neurophysiology, and CELL 6660, Topics in Neuroscience Research.

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Robert Dotson

Robert DotsonProfessor of Practice, Ph.D., Tulane University, 1998. Interests include neuroendocrinology and signal transduction in response to cytokines. Dr. Dotson teaches CELL 2050, Genetics, CELL 3750/6750, Cell Biology, CELL 3755/6755, Cell Biology Laboratory, and CELL 4250, Principles in Immunology.

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Benjamin Hall

BenHallAssistant Professor, Ph.D., Simon Fraser University, 2002. Research interests: Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control synapse development and function in the neocortex. The goal is to understand how perturbations in synapse maturation and circuit formation relate to behavioral changes associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. Studies are carried out both in vitro and in vivo through a combination of techniques in mouse genetics, electrophysiology, molecular biology, and cellular imaging.

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Nancy Hopkins

Nancy HopkinsProfessor of Practice, Ph.D., Tulane University, 1992. Research centers around the understanding of the interaction of the xenobiotics, both naturally occurring and synthetic, with the cytochrome P450 enzymes and the nuclear steroid hormone receptor superfamily. My lab uses hormone sensitive cancer cells to study the mechanism of the effects of these chemicals on P450 isoform induction and hormone receptor response. We also use a bacterial P450 induction system as a model for the induction of P450 in mammaliam cells. Purified human P450 isoforms are used to test xenobiotics as inhibitors of certain isoforms that have been implicated in carcinogenesis. Dr. Hopkins teaches CELL 1035, Heredity and Society Lab, CELL 3035, Molecular Biology Lab, CELL 4010, Cellular Biochemistry, and CELL 4225, Microbiology Lab.

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Frank Jones

Frank JonesProfessor, Gerald and Flora Jo Mansfield Piltz Professorship in Cancer Research. Research fields: Molecular biology of breast cancer progression and therapeutic resistance. Signal transduction mediated by the EGFR-family. Regulation of gene expression in schizophrenia. Molecular alterations associated with brain injury. Micro RNA function in development and disease. Mouse models of neural and breast development.

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Phone: (504) 862-8081


David A. Mullin

David A. MullinAssociate Professor. Research in the Mullin lab is divided between two main projects. The first project focuses on a new chemical class of antimicrobial agents that we discovered called the DDPs. One of these, 4-DDP1956, is effective in vitro against all gram positive bacterial pathogens tested including methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains (MRSA), vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE), and Bacillus anthracis to name a few. We are in the process of identifying the cellular target of 4-DDP1956, and we preparing to begin testing the therapeutic potential of 4-DDP1956 in mice. Finally, we are preparing to synthesize chemical derivatives of 4-DDP1956 that have higher antimicrobial activity and lower toxicity.

Our second major project is to use bacterial fermentation end products to produce liquid fuels for automobiles. We now have several dozen novel bacterial strains that produce liquid fuel that has the same energy content as conventional unleaded gasoline, works in unmodified automobiles, but does not contribute toward increasing the carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere. Dr. Mullin teaches CELL 3030/6030, Molecular Biology, and CELL 4220/6220, Microbiology.

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Ken Muneoka

Ken MuneokaJohn L. & Mary Wright Ebaugh Chair in Science and Engineering and Professor, Ph.D., University of California Irvine, 1983. Limb development; developmental growth control; cell-cell interactions; pattern formation. The role of cellular position and positional information in the control of cell proliferation is being investigated in the developing mouse limb. We employ embryonic surgical procedures to investigate spatial and temporal differences in the regulation of cell growth by introducing cells that have been characterized in vitro. By using a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches, our long term goal is to understand how cellular interactions regulate the reproducible patterns of proliferation during limb development. Dr. Muneoka teaches CELL 4130/6130, Embryology, CELL 6080, Advanced Developmental and Cell Biology II, and CELL 6840, Current Topics in Developmental Biology.

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Katharine Parrish

Ken MuneokaProfessor of Practice, Ph.D., Pharmacology University of Louisiana @ Monroe 1978; National Institutes of Health Post Doctoral Fellow, 1978 Tulane University School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, MD Louisiana State University School of Medicine in New Orleans 1984 Residency in Otolaryngology Tulane University School of Medicine, Retired from the practice of medicine in 2000. Dr. Parrish teaches CELL 3050/6050, Foundations of Pharmacology, CELL 3650/6650, Fundamentals of Pathophysiology, and CELL 6490, Gross Anatomy. Dr. Parrish’s interest include the diagnosis and treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. She is also interested in learning strategies.


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Laura Schrader

Laura SchraderAssociate Professor, Ph.D., Tulane University, 1997. Molecular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity and learning and memory. Techniques include: Patch clamp electrophysiology in brain slices, behavioral paradigms, molecular biology and biochemistry. Our ultimate goal is to better understand how modulation of ion channels regulates neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity in the context of learning and memory. Dr. Schrader teaches CELL 3320, Systems Neuroscience.

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Jeffrey G. Tasker

Jeffrey G. TaskerRecipient, Provost's Award for Excellence in Research and Scholarship, 2005 Catherine and Hunter Pierson Chair in Neuroscience, Ph.D., University of Bordeaux, France, 1986. Intracellular and patch-clamp electrophysiology using in vitro brain slices. Study of membrane electrical properties, synaptic circuits and hormone regulation of hypothalamic neuroendocrine cells. Combined electrophysiological and neuroanatomical studies with intracellular markers, histochemical and immunocytochemical techniques. Dr. Tasker teaches CELL 3310/6310, Cellular Neuroscience, CELL 6360, Topics in Neurophysiology, and CELL 6550, Synaptic Organization of the Brain.

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Leonard B. Thien

Leonard B. ThienProfessor, Ph.D., University of California, 1968. Evolution and molecular systematics are studied using a combination of PCR, nucleotide sequencing and morphometric analysis. Other areas of interest include ant-plant interactions, reproductive biology of primitive angiosperms and ecology of the Mississippi delta ecosystem. Dr. Thien teaches CELL 1010, General Biology, CELL 3030/6030, Molecular Biology, and CELL 4440/6440, Advanced Molecular Biology.

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Nandini Vasudevan

Nandini VasudevanAssistant Professor, Ph.D., Indian Institute of Science, 1999. Research Fields: Hormonal control of genes and behavior; hormone-mediated signaling in neurons and glia. Techniques include: cell cultures, behavioral paradigms, molecular biology and biochemistry. Our aim is to understand how different modes of hormone signaling integrate to regulate genes that ultimately govern behaviors. In rodents, we study how estrogen signaling controls reproductive and social behaviors and how thyroid hormone signaling regulates mood as model systems to understand hormonal action.

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Phone: (504) 862-3158


Meena Vijayaraghavan

Meena Vijayaraghavan Professor of Practice, Ph.D., University of Madras (India), 1994. Dr. Vijayaraghavan teaches CELL 1010, General Biology, and CELL 2050, Genetics. Research interests are in the areas of environmental carcinogenesis, cancer studies, and pediatric nephrology. She has teaching and research experience in India, Japan, and the US. She is interested in incorporating service learning in her biology courses.

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Shusheng Wang

Shusheng Wang Assistant Professor, Ph. D., Tulane University, 2004. He also holds a secondary appointment in the department of Ophthalmology at Tulane. Research interest: to dissect the epigenetic mechanisms of retinal vascular development and disease using genetic mouse model and in vitro system, with a focus on microRNAs and chromatin factors. The long term goal of his research is to develop novel and effective therapeutics for degenerative eye diseases. Dr. Wang will teach CELL 6080, Advanced Developmental and Cell Biology II. Website:

http://tulane.edu/sse/cell/faculty/wang.cfm

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