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Cardiologist goes with the flow

May 3, 2013 11:00 AM

Fran Simon
fsimon@tulane.edu

Dr. Corey Goldman is fascinated with flow. The Tulane University vascular cardiologist was inspired by his computerized imaging studies of the body’s veins and arteries to explore creating original art.

Tidewind Laughter

“Tidewind Laughter” is a “pure synthetic picture,” says vascular cardiologist Dr. Corey Goldman, who melded houses from different locations in the Fauburg Marigny into one image to create a neighborhood.


As vascular director at the Tulane Heart and Vascular Institute, Goldman is passionate about treating varicose veins using sclerotherapy, a procedure involving the injection of a detergent to disrupt the inner walls of a vein and prevent filling with blood.

“It’s very gratifying to see them go away so rapidly, right before your eyes.”

Goldman has trained medical residents how to perform CT angiography, creating images of the body’s anatomy to identify blockages in vessels and abnormal chambers in the heart, without invasive surgery.

The images are “like the 3D images made in Hollywood that have replaced cartoons,” he says. “The colors are beautiful and the quality of the images is astonishing. I began to think, rather than just using this technology with doctors, I might make beautiful images for myself and others.”

After Hurricane Katrina, the New York native began to appreciate the unique aesthetic of New Orleans architecture.

“Many houses were being repainted in bohemian colors and the vivid saturation started jumping out at me everywhere I looked. One day, I had a vision: All of these bright houses should be visualized at one time.”

He uses the image technology to reconstruct blocks of houses from various locations, smoothing the images together to create a neighborhood, and adding other elements.

His artwork, Goldman says, is a representation of the revitalization of the Crescent City.

“I keep working with an image, until I sense a spiritual effect,” Goldman says. “Then the picture lets me know it’s finished.”

He plans to keep creating the images with the hope that he and a friend, watercolorist Robert Guthrie, will open a gallery together in the French Quarter.


Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 504-865-5000 website@tulane.edu