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Economist reflects on black women in contemporary America

March 12, 2013 11:00 AM

Aidan Smith
asmith41@tulane.edu

March marks the celebration of Women’s History Month, a time to consider how the past has shaped the present. At Tulane on Thursday (March 14), distinguished labor economist, author and political commentator Julianne Malveaux will reflect on current affairs and the intersection of gender and race from an economic perspective with her talk, “Slipping through the Cracks: The Status of Black Females.”

Julianne Malveaux

Labor economist Julianne Malveaux will speak on “Slipping through the Cracks: The Status of Black Females” at Tulane on Thursday. (Photo from the Anna Julia Cooper Project)


Malveaux, president emeritus of Bennett College for Women and the founder of Last Word Productions, will speak at 7 p.m. in the Rogers Memorial Chapel on the Tulane uptown campus.

The lecture is open to the public, and members of the greater New Orleans community are encouraged to participate in this conversation, says Melissa Harris-Perry, professor of political science and founding director of the Anna Julia Cooper Project on Gender, Race and Politics, which is hosting the lecture.

“We are honored to host Julianne Malveaux as our speaker this year,” Harris-Perry says. “Malveaux, like Anna Julia Cooper for whom this lecture series is named, is a trailblazing scholar whose intellectual and political commitments place women of color firmly at the center of inquiry.

"She is an extraordinary economist whose scholarly record, public contributions, and academic service are unmatched. Her voice is both prescient and uncompromising.”

Launched in early 2012, the Anna Julia Cooper Project investigates how gender and race intersect to shape women’s politics in the South.

Initiatives of the project include student research opportunities, a postdoctoral program, seminars for faculty and students, and the annual Anna Julia Cooper Lecture. 

Named in honor of one of the most noted African-American intellectuals in the nation's history, the AJC Project serves as a hub for academic and community-based research and engagement on the intersectional identities of race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation.

Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 504-865-5000 website@tulane.edu