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Ted Buchanan

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 Tulane Empowers

High school students to learn the business of music
A partnership between Tulane University and The Trombone Shorty Foundation will expand to teach NOLA high schoolers music business savvy.
 
Nonstop excitement under way at Helluva Hullabaloo Auction
“Downton Abbey” tour, World Series tickets and a Super Bowl raffle are among items at the 12th annual auction benefiting Tulane student-athletes and Empowers programs.
 
Journalist David Bornstein speaks about social innovation
A panel of local visionaries joins the NewDay speaker to answer questions after talking about their social innovation projects.
 
Scholarship recipients say ‘thank you’
More than 100 students turn out for the annual scholarship luncheon, to participate in a letter-writing event to donors.
 
Fruit trees bring more opportunity for Grow Dat
As part of Final Four week, Tulane student-athletes join middle school students in planting satsuma trees at Grow Dat Youth Farm.
 
Auction Fund-raiser Features Sports Action
The Tulane Grads and Dads Auction, online through June 15, supports scholarships for student-athletes.

Physicist has key to greener polymer manufacturing

Reed's technology will help the industry become greener and more efficient. 

Wayne Reed
Wayne Reed’s patented technology allows real-time monitoring of polymer reactions, which are necessary to produce materials used in planes, cars, electronics and more. (Photo by Paula Burch-Celentano)

 

April 16, 2012

Michael Ramos
mcramos@tulane.edu

Tulane University physicist Wayne Reed says he wants to revolutionize the polymer manufacturing sector, an important component of the global economy. Through his patented technology, Reed and colleagues see a $100 billion opportunity in the $1.2 trillion polymer industry, and the key to helping this industry become greener and more efficient.

Reed’s method allows real-time monitoring of polymer reactions, which are necessary to produce materials used in planes, cars, paint, adhesives, coatings, fertilizers, electronics, medicine and more. Currently, polymers are created using recipes with the results often left to chance, he says. More...

 

 

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