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Ted Buchanan

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 Tulane Empowers

Nonstop excitement under way at Helluva Hullabaloo Auction
“Downton Abbey” tour, World Series tickets and a Super Bowl raffle are among items at the 12th annual auction benefiting Tulane student-athletes and Empowers programs.
 
New Orleans Posse chapter opens with Tulane’s help
A $200,000 grant from the Edward G. Schlieder Educational Foundation boosts program that provides a social network for New Orleans teens bound for college.
 
Photo: Scientific framework
Steel girders are in place for a new $7.4 million science building on the uptown campus, the Donna and Paul Flower Hall for Research and Innovation.
 
Students design and build urban farm
At Tulane City Center, students envision and implement the construction of the Grow Dat Youth Farm.
 
Scholars carry Dean Jean’s values around the world
The first Jean Danielson Memorial Scholars have fellowships allowing them to travel, serve others and expand their studies.
 
Barataria Bay Beckons Coastal Scientists
Researchers such as Alex Kolker are in for the long haul studying the effects of the oil spill in Barataria Bay.

Physicist has key to greener polymer manufacturing

Reed's technology will help the industry become greener and more efficient. 

Wayne Reed
Wayne Reed’s patented technology allows real-time monitoring of polymer reactions, which are necessary to produce materials used in planes, cars, electronics and more. (Photo by Paula Burch-Celentano)

 

April 16, 2012

Michael Ramos
mcramos@tulane.edu

Tulane University physicist Wayne Reed says he wants to revolutionize the polymer manufacturing sector, an important component of the global economy. Through his patented technology, Reed and colleagues see a $100 billion opportunity in the $1.2 trillion polymer industry, and the key to helping this industry become greener and more efficient.

Reed’s method allows real-time monitoring of polymer reactions, which are necessary to produce materials used in planes, cars, paint, adhesives, coatings, fertilizers, electronics, medicine and more. Currently, polymers are created using recipes with the results often left to chance, he says. More...

 

 

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