shadow_tr
Ted Buchanan

.

 Tulane Empowers

New Orleans Posse chapter opens with Tulane’s help
A $200,000 grant from the Edward G. Schlieder Educational Foundation boosts program that provides a social network for New Orleans teens bound for college.
 
Hertz Center wows coaches, student-athletes
Green Wave fans help dedicate $13 million practice facility for basketball and volleyball teams.
 
Our design, their homes
Social Entrepreneurship Professor Byron Mouton talks about how the URBANbuild program has made a difference for students and neighborhoods. View the video.
 
Welcoming Weatherhead Hall
Newest residence hall for “our best and brightest students” is a welcome addition and a symbol of resurgence for the university and city.
 
Creating a Community Hub for Social Innovators
Tulane can play a leading role in developing ideas for community engagement, says social innovation guru Rick Aubry.
 
Making the Next Generation Heart Smart
Dr. Gerald Berenson believes heart-disease prevention should begin in childhood. View the video.

Physicist has key to greener polymer manufacturing

Reed's technology will help the industry become greener and more efficient. 

Wayne Reed
Wayne Reed’s patented technology allows real-time monitoring of polymer reactions, which are necessary to produce materials used in planes, cars, electronics and more. (Photo by Paula Burch-Celentano)

 

April 16, 2012

Michael Ramos
mcramos@tulane.edu

Tulane University physicist Wayne Reed says he wants to revolutionize the polymer manufacturing sector, an important component of the global economy. Through his patented technology, Reed and colleagues see a $100 billion opportunity in the $1.2 trillion polymer industry, and the key to helping this industry become greener and more efficient.

Reed’s method allows real-time monitoring of polymer reactions, which are necessary to produce materials used in planes, cars, paint, adhesives, coatings, fertilizers, electronics, medicine and more. Currently, polymers are created using recipes with the results often left to chance, he says. More...

 

 

Office of Development,  P.O. Box 61075, New Orleans, LA 70161-9986 | 504-865-5794  |  888-265-7576 | giving@tulane.edu