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Ted Buchanan

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 Tulane Empowers

Book offers multilingual help for Haitian children
For their graduation requirement, social work students created The Big Shake, a book to help children in Haiti process trauma.
 
New Orleans Posse chapter opens with Tulane’s help
A $200,000 grant from the Edward G. Schlieder Educational Foundation boosts program that provides a social network for New Orleans teens bound for college.
 
Photo: Scientific framework
Steel girders are in place for a new $7.4 million science building on the uptown campus, the Donna and Paul Flower Hall for Research and Innovation.
 
Cuts in benefits, services are unfair to women
“Women need jobs, not cuts,” declares National Organization for Women president Terry O’Neill, a Tulane law alumna.
 
Little changes, big impact
Laura Murphy, social entrepreneurship professor, discusses the impact of social innovation that she has observed in rural Africa. View the video.
 
Welcoming Weatherhead Hall
Newest residence hall for “our best and brightest students” is a welcome addition and a symbol of resurgence for the university and city.

A tale of two cities

A group of 11 architecture students travel to Japan to explore architectural links between Kyoto and New Orleans 

July 19, 2013

Erika Herran 
eherran@tulane.edu   

“Only in New Orleans” is a phrase often used to express the uniqueness of the Crescent City. But one Tulane University professor believes there is a place with similar quirks—Kyoto, Japan.    

Kentaro Tsubaki, assistant professor of architecture, found the resemblance striking enough to lead a group of 11 students on a trip this summer to study the architectural links between the two cities.

“Architectural decisions have a lot to do with climate,” says Tsubaki. “Kyoto and New Orleans have very humid, almost tropical environments, so their structures follow similar trends.”   

Students on the two-weeklong trip found a machiya, an urban townhouse common in Kyoto, to be comparable to the shotgun homes of New Orleans.   

“The houses have narrow entrances and rooms that line up one behind the other. They’re definitely similar to a shotgun,” says William Nemitoff, a fourth-year architecture student. More...

 

 

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